YANFS is the new WebNFS (and is opensource as well)

I would like to announce that what was once called WebNFS has been renamed and released as YANFS and is now opensource.


So, why the change in name? The WebNFS name has been used in the description of two sets of work. The first use of WebNFS was in the context of a set of NFS protocol interpretations.



The second use of WebNFS has been by Sun to describe a Java implementation of the XDR, RPC, and NFSv2/NFSv3 (client) protocols. It was my opinion that the WebNFS name really should remain as a reference to the protocol interpretations and not a particular implementation of those and other protocols.


Hence the new name: YANFS (Yet Another NFS).


The other question that is likely to arise is "why now?". Why after all these years would Sun opensource the Java NFS implementation. Well, with the upcoming NFSv4.1 protocol there has been additional interest in its various features and in particular the pNFS feature. I had received a couple of queries about our Java NFS implementation from non-Sun developers that wanted to take advantage of the work that had been done within Sun. So, I have been able to work through the internal process issues to release a bit of source to help kick-start a Java implementation of an NFSv4.1 client and server.


I have created a new project over at java.net for YANFS. The original set of source is just the XDR, RPC, and NFSv2/NFSv3 client classes. It also includes the XFile APIs. First thing on my list is to do a little cleanup of the original code and classes. Once that is complete, I will be sorting through some of the prototype code that is around that implements a Java NFS server so there is a client and server base to work from. Once that is complete, I should be moving on to the NFSv4.1 implementation.


Given the original queries about our WebNFS implementation, I know there is an interest in working on NFSv4.1 in Java. If that is you, join the YANFS java.net project and help out.


There were many people involved in the creation of the original WebNFS implementation but one name is completely obvious if you followed the RFC links above: Brent Callaghan. He drove the WebNFS development work for a long time within Sun. Thanks, Brent!


I would also like to take an opportunity to recognize Mike Eisler for pushing the XDR protocol documents forward within the IETF process; it is now an Internet Standard. Thanks, Mike!

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