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Shay Shmeltzer's Oracle Development Tools Tips

  • May 26, 2015

Leveraging Oracle Developer Cloud Service in SQL and PL/SQL Projects - lifecycle and team collaboration

Shay Shmeltzer
Director of Product Management - Oracle

[Note - A newer version of this demo uses new functionality in DevCS to execute SQLcl command - see these entries - Part 1, Part 2]

Usually my demos are targeted at Java developers, but I realize that a lot of developers out there are not using Java, for example in the Oracle install base there is a huge section of PLSQL developers. This however doesn't change their requirements from a development platform. They can still benefit from version management and code review functionality. They still need to track bugs/issues and requirements from their users, and they still need to collaborate in a team environment. 

So I decided to try out and see what would be the development lifecycle experience for a PL/SQL developer if they'll leverage the services provided by the Oracle Developer Cloud Service - here is a demo that shows a potential experience. 

What you'll see in the demo:

 

  • Using JDeveloper to create DB Diagrams, Tables and PL/SQL code
  • Version manage PL/SQL and SQL with Git
  • Defining a cloud project and adding users
  • Check code in, and branch PL/SQL functions
  • Tracking tasks for developers
  • Code review by team members
  • Build automation (with Ant) - and almost a deploy to the DB

 

As you can see it is quite a nice complete solution that is very quick to setup and use.

It seems that the concepts of continuous integration in the world of PL/SQL development are not yet a common thing. In the demo I use the Ant SQL command to show how you could run a SQL script you created to create the objects directly in the database - which is probably the equivalent of doing a deployment in the world of Java. However if you prefer you can use Ant for example to copy files, zip them, or do many other tasks such as run automated testing frameworks.

The Ant task I used is this:

  <path id="antclasspath">
    <fileset dir=".">
      <include name="ojdbc7.jar"/>
    </fileset>
  </path>
   <target name="deploy">
    <sql driver="oracle.jdbc.OracleDriver" userid="hr2" password="hr"
         url="jdbc:oracle:thin:@//server:1521/sid" src="./script1.sql" 

classpathref="antclasspath"/>

  </target> 

I had both the ojdbc7.jar file and the script file at the root of the project for convenience. 

While my demo uses JDeveloper - you should be able to achieve similar functionality with any tool that supports Git. In fact if you rather not use a tool you can simply use command lines to check your files directly into the cloud.

 

 

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