Wednesday Mar 25, 2015

86% of Data Breaches Miss Detection, How Do You Beat The Odds?

Information security is simply not detecting the bad guys

This according to the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report. In fact, antivirus, intrusion detection systems, and log review all pick up less than 1% of data breach incidents. Very few companies do proactive monitoring and those that do are simply troubleshooting problems they already know about. The result is that 86% of data breach incidents were ultimately detected by someone other than the victimized organization; an embarrassing statistic.

Only 35% of organizations audit to determine whether privileged users are tampering with systems. As well, for nearly 70% of organizations, it would take greater than one day to detect and correct unauthorized database access or change. With average data breach compromises taking less than a day, the majority of organizations could lose millions of dollars before even noticing.

Join Oracle and learn how to put in place effective activity monitoring including:

  • Privileged user auditing for misuse and error
  • Suspicious activity alerting
  • Security and compliance reporting 

Monday Mar 16, 2015

Three Big Data Threat Vectors

The Biggest Breaches are Yet to Come

Where a few years ago we saw 1 million to 10 million records breached in a single incident, today we are in the age of mega-breaches, where 100 and 200 million records breached is not uncommon.

According to the Independent Oracle Users Group Enterprise Data Security Survey, 34% of respondents say that a data breach at their organization is "inevitable" or "somewhat likely" in 2015.

Combine this with the fact that the 2014 Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report tallied more than 63,000 security incidents—including 1,367 confirmed data breaches. That's a lot of data breaches.

As business and IT executives are learning by experience, big data brings big security headaches. Built with very little security in mind, Hadoop is now being integrated with existing IT infrastructure. This can further expose existing database data with less secure Hadoop infrastructure. Hadoop is an open-source software framework for storing and processing big data in a distributed fashion. Simply put, it was developed to address massive data storage and faster processing, not security.

With enormous amounts of less secure big data, integrated with existing database information, I fear the biggest data breaches are yet to be announced. When organizations are not focusing on security for their big data environments, they jeopardize their company, employees, and customers.

Top Three Big Data Threats

For big data environments, and Hadoop in particular, today's top threats include:
  • Unauthorized access. Built with the notion of “data democratization”—meaning all data was accessible by all users of the cluster—Hadoop is unable to stand up to the rigorous compliance standards, such as HIPPA and PCI DSS, due to the lack of access controls on data. The lack of password controls, basic file system permissions, and auditing expose the Hadoop cluster to sensitive data exposure.
  • Data provenance. In traditional Hadoop, it has been difficult to determine where a particular data set originated and what data sources it was derived from. At a minimum the potential for garbage-in-garbage-out issues arise; or worse, analytics that drive business decisions could be taken from suspect or compromised data. Users need to know the source of the data in order to trust its validity, which is critical for relevant predictive activities.
  • DIY Hadoop. A build-your-own cluster presents inherent risks, especially in shops where there are few experienced engineers that can build and maintain a Hadoop cluster. As a cluster grows from small project to advanced enterprise Hadoop, every period of growth—patching, tuning, verifying versions between Hadoop modules, OS libraries, utilities, user management etc.—becomes more difficult. Security holes, operational security and stability may be ignored until a major disaster occurs, such as a data breach.
Big data security is an important topic that I plan to write more about. I am currently working with MIT on a new paper to help provide some more answers to the challenges raised here. Stay tuned.

Monday Mar 09, 2015

Security and Governance Will Increase Big Data Innovation in 2015

"Let me begin with my vision of the FTC and its role in light of the emergence of big data. I grew up in a beach town in Southern California. To me, the FTC is like the lifeguard on a beach. Like a vigilant lifeguard, the FTC’s job is not to spoil anyone’s fun but to make sure that no one gets hurt. With big data, the FTC’s job is to get out of the way of innovation while making sure that consumer privacy is respected."

- Edith Ramirez, Chairwoman, Federal

Trade Commission Ms. Ramirez highlights the FTC's role in protecting consumers from what she refers to as "indiscriminate data collection" of personal information. Her main concern is that organizations can potentially use this information to ultimately implicate individual privacy. There are many instances highlighting the ability to take what was previously considered anonymous data, only to correlate with other publicly available information in order to increase the ability to implicate individuals.

Finding Out Truthful Data from "Anonymous" Information 

Her concerns are not unfounded; the highly referenced paper Robust De-anonymization of Large Sparse Datasets, illustrates the sensitivity of supposedly anonymous information. The authors were able to identify the publicly available and "anonymous" dataset of 500,000 Netflix subscribers by cross referencing it with the Internet Movie Database. They were able to successfully identify records of users, revealing such sensitive data as the subscribers' political and religious preferences, for example. In a more recent instance of big data security concerns, the public release of a New York taxi cab data set was completely de-anonymized, ultimately unveiling cab driver annual income, and possibly more alarming, the weekly travel habits of their passengers.

Many large firms have found their big data projects shut down by compliance officers concerned about legal or regulatory violations. Chairwoman Hernandez highlights specific cases where the FTC has cracked down on firms they feel have violated customer privacy rights, including the United States vs. Google, Facebook, and Twitter. She feels that big data opens up additional security challenges that must be addressed.

"Companies are putting data together in new ways, comingling data sets that have never been comingled before," says Jeff Pollock, Oracle vice president for product management. "That’s precisely the value of big data environments. But these changes are also leading to interesting new security and compliance concerns."

The possible security and privacy pitfalls of big data center around three fundamental areas:

  • Ubiquitous and indiscriminate collection from a wide range of devices 
  • Unexpected uses of collected data, especially without customer consent 
  • Unintended data breach risks with larger consequences

Organizations will find big data experimentation easier to initiate when the data involved is locked down. They need to be able to address regulatory and privacy concerns by demonstrating compliance. This means extending modern security practices like data masking and redaction to the full big data environment, in addition to the must-haves of access, authorization and auditing.

Securing the big data lifecycle requires:

  • Authentication and authorization of users, applications and databases 
  • Privileged user access and administration 
  • Data encryption of data at rest and in motion 
  • Data redaction and masking for non production environments 
  • Separation of roles and responsibilities 
  • Implementing least privilege 
  • Transport security 
  • API security 
  • Monitoring, auditing, alerting and compliance reporting

With Oracle, organizations can achieve all the benefits that big data has to offer while providing a comprehensive data security approach that ensures the right people, internal and external, get access to the appropriate data at right time and place, within the right channel. The Oracle Big Data solution prevents and safeguards against malicious attacks and protects organizational information assets by securing data in-motion and at-rest. It enables organizations to separate roles and responsibilities and protect sensitive data without compromising privileged user access, such as database administrators. Furthermore, it provides monitoring, auditing and compliance reporting across big data systems as well as traditional data management systems.

Learn more about Oracle Security Solutions.

This article has been re-purposed from the Oracle Big Data blog.  

Wednesday Mar 04, 2015

Securing Information in the New Digital Economy

We are in the midst of a data breach epidemic, fueled by a lucrative information black market. The perimeter security most IT organizations rely on has become largely ineffective. Nearly 70% of security resources are focused on perimeter controls, but most exploited vulnerabilities are internal. 

Effective modern security requires an inside-out approach with a focus on data and internal controls.

A New Hacker Economy

Today, a layered economy of specialized, organized hackers has created a black market estimated to be more lucrative than the illegal drug trade. (Lillian Ablon 2014) Hacking-for-hire has made the black market accessible to non-experts, expanding its reach exponentially.  As businesses grow their online footprints, criminals find new ways of attacking their vulnerabilities.

Thinking Inside-Out

Internal systems are the new perimeter – the new front line in the battle for data security. Security should be built into the customer and employee experiences.

  • Manage privileged user access and think beyond the password: another layer of authentication can vastly increase security.
  • Make it more costly and difficult for attackers by protecting the most valuable information first. 

Rebalancing Information Security

Diminish the information supply chain and cut off the cash flow to the black market. Taking a security inside-out approach could bring an end to the arms race, giving economic recovery a chance.

To learn more about Securing Information in the New Digital Economy, read the joint Oracle and Verizon Report.

Tuesday Feb 03, 2015

All Data is Not Equal, Map Security Controls to the Value of Data

As you look at data, you will quickly realize that not all data is equal.   What do I mean by that? Quite simply, some data simply does not require the same security controls as other data.   

When explaining this to customers, we use a metals analogy to simplify the provisioning of controls. Bronze to represent the least sensitive data, up through to Platinum, the highest value and most sensitive data within an organization.

Thinking in this manner provides the ability to refine many configurations into a few pre-configured, pre-approved, reference architectures. Applying this methodology is especially important when it comes to the cloud. It comes down to consistency in applying security controls, based on the data itself.

Oracle’s preventive, detective, and administrative pillars can be applied to the various data categorizations. At this point in the conversation, customers begin to understand more pragmatically how this framework can be used to align security controls with the value, or sensitivity, of the data.

Security practitioners can then work with lines of business to assign the appropriate level of controls, both systematically and consistently across the organization.  

So for example, at the bronze level, items such as application of patches, secure configuration scanning and the most basic auditing would be appropriate. Data deemed more sensitive, such as personally identifiable information, or personal health information, require additional security controls around the application data. This would include, for example, blocking default access by those designated as database administrators.

Then finally, at the highest data sensitivity level--Platinum level--should exhibit blocking database changes during production time frames, preventing SQL injection attacks and centralized enterprise-wide reporting and alerting for compliance and audit requirements.  

To learn more about Oracle Security Solutions, download the ebook "Securing Oracle Database 12c: A Technical Primer" by Oracle security experts.

Friday Oct 17, 2014

Why Infinity Insurance Chose Oracle Advanced Security and Database Vault

Infinity InsuranceI had an opportunity to sit down with Cathy Robinson, Database Administrator at Infinity Property and Casualty Corporation while at Oracle OpenWorld 2014. Infinity Insurance is a public insurance company that deals with high risk maturities, mostly auto insurance, and provide products through a network of approximately 12,500 independent agencies and brokers. Cathy told me how they use Oracle Advanced Security for encryption and Oracle Database Vault for database privilege user controls.

Cathy has an interesting background with the Department of Defense and joined Infinity with a great understanding of what is required to lock down data and secure an IT environment. As I interviewed Cathy, I learned that the main overall issues they face include:

  • Protecting sensitive personally identifiable information ( i.e. payment card, social security numbers)
  • Educating employees on the importance of securing this data
  • Securing older applications where changing software code is prohibitive

So they have been able to implement Oracle Advanced Security to address these security requirements without having to make any application changes. Additionally, there has been "no performance degradation whatsoever."To further put in place a defense in depth database security strategy, Infinity is also implementing Oracle Database Vault for separation of duties and least privilege.

When I asked why they chose Oracle, Cathy responded with the following:

  • One vendor instead of multiple point solution vendors
  • Deep integration with Oracle Databases
  • Oracle security expertise, which included a database security assessment
Click here to listen to the interview.

Wednesday Sep 10, 2014

SANS Webcast: Simplifying Data Encryption and Redaction Without Touching the Code

SANS Analyst and Instructor and well known security expert, Dave Shackleford, will be doing a review of Oracle Advanced Security on September 16, 12:00 p.m. ET/ 3:00 p.m. ET

Register now for the webcast "Simplifying Data Encryption and Redaction Without Touching the Code" 

The need for organizations to protect sensitive information has never been more paramount. The risks of data breaches and sensitive data exposures are driving organizations to look for solutions, as an increasing amount of data is being stored and processed outside the perimeter, in cloud applications and service environments. Organizations must protect this sensitive data at its heart, in the databases. In this webcast, we discuss a recent review by SANS Analyst and Instructor Dave Shackleford of Oracle Advanced Security for Oracle Database 12c and its encryption and redaction capabilities.

Register for the webcast and be among the first to receive an advance copy of a SANS whitepaper discussing the Analyst Program's review of Oracle Advanced Security.

Tuesday Sep 02, 2014

Oracle Audit Vault and Database Firewall Wins Reader's Choice Award for Best Database Security Solution

Thank you to all those who voted for the Database Trends and Applications Reader's Choice Awards, 2014 and voting Oracle Audit Vault and Database Firewall as the best database security solution on the market. 

"Unlike any other awards programs conducted by DBTA, this one is special because the nominees are submitted and the winners are chosen by the experts—whose opinions carry more weight than all others—you, the readers. With more than 22,000 votes cast across 31 categories, the contest between candidates was often neck and neck. As a result, we are showcasing both winners and finalists in each category."

Oracle wins in a number of categories including:

  1. Best Relational Database: Oracle Database
  2. Best Cloud Database: Oracle Database 12c
  3. Best Database Appliance: Oracle Exadata
  4. Best Database Administration Solution: Oracle Enterprise Manager
  5. Best Database Performance Solution: Oracle Enterprise Manager
  6. Best Database Backup Solution: Oracle Database Backup Logging Recovery Appliance
  7. Best Data Replication Solution: Oracle GoldenGate 12c
  8. Best Change Data Capture Solution: Oracle CDC
  9. Best Data Virtualization Solution: Oracle Database 12c Multitenant
  10. Best Cloud Integration Solution: Oracle Cloud Integration
  11. Best Streaming Data Solution: Oracle Streams
  12. Best Data Mining Solution: Oracle Advanced Analytics

Thursday Aug 07, 2014

Introducing Oracle Key Vault for Centralized Key Management

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Oracle Customers Secure Critical Encryption Keys with Oracle Key Vault

Centrally Manage Oracle Database Encryption Master Keys, Oracle Wallets, Java KeyStores and Other Credential Files

Encryption is widely recognized as the gold standard for protecting data privacy, but encryption is only as strong as its key management. Critical credential files such as Oracle Wallets, Java KeyStores, SSH key files and SSL certificate files are often widely distributed across servers and server clusters with error-prone synchronization and backup mechanisms.

To address the need for robust key management, Oracle today introduced Oracle Key Vault, a software appliance designed to securely manage encryption keys and credential files in the enterprise data center.

Read the press release and register for the webcast to learn how Oracle Key Vault:
  • Centralizes Keys in a modern, secure, and robust key management platform
  • Secures, shares, and manages keys and secrets for the enterprise
  • Manages key lifecycle stages including creation, rotation, and expiration

Oracle Key Vault Learn more: Oracle Key Vault enables customers to quickly deploy encryption and other security solutions.

ipad
Webcast: August 21, 2014
10:00 a.m. PT/1:00 a.m. ET
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Thursday Jul 17, 2014

What's the Difference Between Oracle Transparent Data Encryption, Data Masking and Data Redaction?

Oracle database security solutions provide three means of making data at rest unreadable. We sometimes get questions about their differences.

Oracle Advanced Security 

Transparent Data Encryption (TDE), a capability of Oracle Advanced Security, is transparent to applications and users by encrypting data within the Oracle Database on disk, without any changes to existing applications. TDE is available as a part of the Oracle Database, so if you have Oracle, you have Oracle Advanced Security and would simply require a license to activate.

When would you use TDE? 

TDE stops would-be attackers from bypassing the database and reading sensitive information from storage by enforcing data-at-rest encryption in the database layer. Applications and users authenticated to the database continue to have access to application data transparently (no application code or configuration changes are required), while attacks from OS users attempting to read sensitive data from tablespace files and attacks from thieves attempting to read information from acquired disks or backups are denied access to the clear text data.

Data Redaction, also a capability of Oracle Advanced Security, provides selective, on-the-fly redaction of sensitive data in SQL query results prior to display by applications so that unauthorized users cannot view the sensitive data. It enables consistent redaction of database columns across application modules accessing the same database information. Data Redaction minimizes changes to applications because it does not alter actual data in internal database buffers, caches, or storage, and it preserves the original data type and formatting when transformed data is returned to the application. 

When would you use data redaction? 

Existing applications often return sensitive data to call center and support staff employees, or even customers that include date of birth, social security numbers, and more.  Traditionally, organizations would have to access and change application source code in order to redact sensitive data. This can be error-prone, laborious, and performance-heavy. Data redaction mitigates this risk and helps organizations comply with compliance requirements, such as PCI DSS, by masking displayed data within applications.

Learn more about transparent data encryption and data redaction. 

Oracle Data Masking and Subsetting

Data Masking enables sensitive information such as credit card or social security numbers to be replaced with realistic values, allowing production data to be safely used for development, testing, or sharing with out-sourcing partners or off-shore teams for other nonproduction purposes..  

When would you use data masking?  

Data masking is used for nonproduction environments for quality assurance, testing, and development purposes. Many organizations inadvertently breach information when they routinely copy sensitive and regulated production data into nonproduction environments. Data in nonproduction environments, which can be lost or stolen, has increasingly become the target of cyber criminals. Data masking helps organizations reduce this risk and comply with compliance requirements.

Learn more about data masking. 

Monday Jun 30, 2014

June Ed of Security Inside Out Newsletter Is Out

Get the latest edition of Oracle Security Inside Out Newsletter and subscribe to future editions. As a bi-monthly security newsletter, we cover all things security for both Oracle Database Security and Identity Management solutions, news, and events. Here are this month's database security articles:

Five Hard Lessons Learned from the Verizon Report on APT1 Attack

Advanced persistent threats (APT) are a type of ongoing cyberattack from well-coordinated and funded cybercriminals who penetrate an organization slowly and methodically. Find out from Oracle experts what key lessons your organization can take away from the analysis of an APT attack.
Read More


Know Your Enemy: Profile Attackers and Defend Targeted Assets

In the new Countering Adversaries webcast series now available on demand, security experts explain how to identify the kinds of adversaries specific industries attract, understand the types of data they are after, and focus in on the tools that provide the most effective deterrence against these specific threats.
Read More

Tuesday Feb 11, 2014

Webcast with ISACA - Want Better Data Security?

Insecure database silos make protecting data challenging and costly. Increasingly, organizations find that database consolidation and private cloud initiatives reduce complexity, risk, and drive down the cost of protecting data and meeting regulatory compliance. 

In this webcast, you will learn how to:

  • Consolidate databases securely
  • Address database security at the infrastructure level
  • Adopt a defense in depth strategy 
Watch Now and learn the controls needed to safeguard your mission critical enterprise data.  

Friday Dec 06, 2013

Q&A: 2013 IOUG Enterprise Data Security Survey Report

With the recent release of the 2013 Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG) Enterprise Data Security Survey Report, I caught up with security experts Roxana Bradescu, Director of Database Security Product Management at Oracle and Michelle Malcher, IOUG President and Oracle Ace Director, to get their perspectives on the report, and what organizations should take away from the results. 

This year, the report broke down the respondents into database security leaders and laggards based on how proactive they were in protecting their data. What are your thoughts on this?

MM: We thought it was more meaningful to contrast the security practices of leaders and laggards, rather than just report an average, which is not really as representative of what’s happening out there. We decided that for an organization to be a leader, they had to first know where all of their sensitive and regulated data resides, they have to encrypt that data, either at rest or in motion, to protect it outside the database, and monitor for database changes such as sensitive data reads and writes. For those respondents who answered negative to all three, the report qualifies them as laggards. So, we have 22% indicated as leaders at one end of a bell curve and 20% of laggards on the other; everyone else is somewhere on the bell curve.

RB: I think looking at the survey results on a bell curve this year really makes this report more actionable for organizations. Many of the companies I talk to are somewhere on the bell curve and are trying to figure out how to be in that top 22%. A lot of attacks are opportunistic and no one wants to be in that bottom 20%, the ones the survey found more likely to face a data breach. To be ahead of the curve, organizations need a defense-in-depth strategy. They need preventive controls like encrypting data, detective controls like monitoring for database changes, as well as administrative controls like knowing where all the sensitive and regulated data resides. But leaders go well beyond that to protect their data.

Of course being a leader requires organizations to make an investment. Michelle, what would you tell IOUG members are the benefits of being a leader?

MM: It is not surprising to see the report found that leadership behavior lowers risk.  Over the past year, leaders experienced a data breach nearly 3 times less than laggards. That’s for actual data breaches. When asked whether a data breach was likely over the next 12 months, 50% of the leaders said they were unlikely to experience one, whereas 62% of laggards said that yes, it is likely, or they were uncertain. 

Roxana, how does an organization move from a laggard to leader position?

Although each organization is different, the approach to protecting databases is common. I suggest organizations start with a database security assessment to understand their risks and controls. It’s critical they consider:

  • Preventing database by-pass
  • Preventing application by-pass
  • Managing privileged user access
  • Detecting and blocking SQL injection attacks 
  • Monitoring databases for system changes

Being able to proactively monitor a secure configuration for the database environment is important as well. Change control in the environment is critical. Oracle offers a lot of materials for customers to protect the mission critical data in their databases.

How can database administrators prepare for the New Year?

MM: Leaders say they have experienced less breaches than laggards, and are less likely to experience them in the future. When we examine what they are doing differently, it’s obvious why. I encourage database administrators and security professionals to read the report and discover where they can improve. 

RB: DBAs play a major role in the security within their organization. IDC states that 66% of sensitive and regulated data resides in databases. By securing their databases, DBAs can protect 66% of the data in their organization - that’s huge. We are seeing DBAs increasingly becoming proactive with a comprehensive database security strategy that includes preventive, detective, and administrative security controls. 

For more analysis and steps you can take to become a leader:

 

Tuesday Oct 29, 2013

Get the Latest Security Inside Out Newsletter, October Edition

The latest October edition of the Security Inside Out newsletter is now available and covers the following important security news:

Oracle Security Inside Out Newsletter

Securing Oracle Database 12c: A Technical Primer

The new multitenant architecture of Oracle Database 12c calls for adopting an updated approach to database security. In response, Oracle security experts have written a new book that is expected to become a key resource for database administrators. Find out how to get a complimentary copy. 

Read More

HIPAA Omnibus Rule Is in Effect: Are You Ready?

On September 23, 2013, the HIPAA Omnibus Rule went into full effect. To help Oracle’s healthcare customers ready their organizations for the new requirements, law firm Ballard Spahr LLP and the Oracle Security team hosted a webcast titled “Addressing the Final HIPAA Omnibus Rule and Securing Protected Health Information.” Find out three key changes affecting Oracle customers. 

Read More

The Internet of Things: A New Identity Management Paradigm

By 2020, it’s predicted there will be 50 billion devices wirelessly connected to the internet, from consumer products to highly complex industrial and manufacturing equipment and processes. Find out the key challenges of protecting identity and data for the new paradigm called the Internet of Things. 

Read More

Sunday Oct 06, 2013

New Database Threats Require New Innovations in Security

If you attended Open World this year, you learned about the advances in Database 12c. As we collect more data and store our data in remote locations and the cloud, 12c restores control with advances to secure your data at the source. At the Chief Security Officer Summit at Leaders Circle, Vipin Samar discussed the changes in the security landscape that are forcing companies to re-examine how data is secured. The recent APT1 report by Mandiant highlights exactly how pervasive the threats are across every industry. 

While the report covers the exploits of a specific government, the techniques being used are similar across the board. A recent report by the Ponemon Insitute noted that 43% of the most serious attacks are SQL injection attacks. The statistic implies that organizations are not as prepared to secure databases and that our most valuable data actually resides in our databases.

 It seems almost every report on the state of IT security mentions database security. As an example, the PWC Global State of Information Security report provides a survey by region of database encryption. In North America alone, 53% of companies don't encrypt databases. Despite the threats, organizations are not fully responding. 

The slides below provide a perspective on how a comprehensive approach to database security can set the foundation for preventing some of the most advanced threats. With Database Security 12c, there are several advances that organizations will want to focus on:

  • Database Redaction - learn more here
  • Privilege Analysis - learn more here.
  • Audit Vault Firewall - learn more here.
  • More about security in 12c here.
For a limited time, you can register for a free copy of a new book on Database Security 12c. 

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