Q&A: 2013 IOUG Enterprise Data Security Survey Report

With the recent release of the 2013 Independent Oracle Users Group (IOUG) Enterprise Data Security Survey Report, I caught up with security experts Roxana Bradescu, Director of Database Security Product Management at Oracle and Michelle Malcher, IOUG President and Oracle Ace Director, to get their perspectives on the report, and what organizations should take away from the results. 

This year, the report broke down the respondents into database security leaders and laggards based on how proactive they were in protecting their data. What are your thoughts on this?

MM: We thought it was more meaningful to contrast the security practices of leaders and laggards, rather than just report an average, which is not really as representative of what’s happening out there. We decided that for an organization to be a leader, they had to first know where all of their sensitive and regulated data resides, they have to encrypt that data, either at rest or in motion, to protect it outside the database, and monitor for database changes such as sensitive data reads and writes. For those respondents who answered negative to all three, the report qualifies them as laggards. So, we have 22% indicated as leaders at one end of a bell curve and 20% of laggards on the other; everyone else is somewhere on the bell curve.

RB: I think looking at the survey results on a bell curve this year really makes this report more actionable for organizations. Many of the companies I talk to are somewhere on the bell curve and are trying to figure out how to be in that top 22%. A lot of attacks are opportunistic and no one wants to be in that bottom 20%, the ones the survey found more likely to face a data breach. To be ahead of the curve, organizations need a defense-in-depth strategy. They need preventive controls like encrypting data, detective controls like monitoring for database changes, as well as administrative controls like knowing where all the sensitive and regulated data resides. But leaders go well beyond that to protect their data.

Of course being a leader requires organizations to make an investment. Michelle, what would you tell IOUG members are the benefits of being a leader?

MM: It is not surprising to see the report found that leadership behavior lowers risk.  Over the past year, leaders experienced a data breach nearly 3 times less than laggards. That’s for actual data breaches. When asked whether a data breach was likely over the next 12 months, 50% of the leaders said they were unlikely to experience one, whereas 62% of laggards said that yes, it is likely, or they were uncertain. 

Roxana, how does an organization move from a laggard to leader position?

Although each organization is different, the approach to protecting databases is common. I suggest organizations start with a database security assessment to understand their risks and controls. It’s critical they consider:

  • Preventing database by-pass
  • Preventing application by-pass
  • Managing privileged user access
  • Detecting and blocking SQL injection attacks 
  • Monitoring databases for system changes

Being able to proactively monitor a secure configuration for the database environment is important as well. Change control in the environment is critical. Oracle offers a lot of materials for customers to protect the mission critical data in their databases.

How can database administrators prepare for the New Year?

MM: Leaders say they have experienced less breaches than laggards, and are less likely to experience them in the future. When we examine what they are doing differently, it’s obvious why. I encourage database administrators and security professionals to read the report and discover where they can improve. 

RB: DBAs play a major role in the security within their organization. IDC states that 66% of sensitive and regulated data resides in databases. By securing their databases, DBAs can protect 66% of the data in their organization - that’s huge. We are seeing DBAs increasingly becoming proactive with a comprehensive database security strategy that includes preventive, detective, and administrative security controls. 

For more analysis and steps you can take to become a leader:

 

Comments:

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

Who are we?

Follow us on

  • TwitterFacebookLinkedIn

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
12
13
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today