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OOW - Oracle Open World

VirtualBox 6.0 in Action: Deploy your own machines on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure

As maybe someone already saw, we've just announced Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 release on our Oracle Virtualization Blog. Today, I'm so excited to share a cool video I've built on one of the most important functionalities we've added to Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0, the Oracle Cloud Infrastructure export functionality; thanks to this feature and the great enhanced Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0 GUI, you can easily get your Development virtual machines, running on your laptop/desktop, uploaded and running on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure.   To get started on your own to add OCI Profiles on VirtualBox 6.0, you have just to create an empty config file by executing: On Linux/MacOS: # mkdir ~/.oci # echo "[DEFAULT]" > ~/.oci/config # touch -m ~/.VirtualBox/oci_config and then add your own OCI profile(s) by using Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0 GUI. To get further information/details on how to create your OCI Profile, you can follow: OCI Documentation on Keys and OCIDs OCI SDK and Tool Configuration This Video demonstrates how it's easy to get your environments running on Oracle Cloud Infrastructure, from Development to Production, from on-premise to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure: Further Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0 feature discussion will follow, let's keep in-touch! Feel free to leave your comments on this blog.

As maybe someone already saw, we've just announced Oracle VM VirtualBox 6.0 Beta 1 release on our Oracle Virtualization Blog. Today, I'm so excited to share a cool video I've built on one of the most...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle GitHub Vagrant Boxes: Oracle Linux 7 Update 6 Developer Preview now available!

Today Oracle Linux 7 Update 6 Developer Preview release has been announced on the Official Oracle Linux Blog; getting started is quick and easy! If you have not done so yet, you will need to download and install the following: Oracle VirtualBox Vagrant Vagrant provides an easy and fully automated way of setting up a developer environment. In conjunction with Oracle’s VirtualBox, Vagrant is a powerful tool for creating a sandbox environment inside a virtual machine. With this announcement, we introduce this powerful automation to users worldwide as a streamlined way for creating virtual machines with Oracle software fully configured and ready to go inside of them. This is yet another in a series of steps for making the lives of developers easier and more productive. Once done, you can clone our official Oracle GitHub Vagrant Boxes repository and, starting from there, get your Oracle Linux 7 Update 6 Developer Preview machine up & running by just following instructions available at: https://github.com/oracle/vagrant-boxes/tree/master/OracleLinux/preview Further information: Oracle VM VirtualBox - Download Vagrant - Download Vagrant - Getting Started documentation Oracle Vagrant Boxes - GitHub Repository Feel free to leave your comments on this blog entry!

Today Oracle Linux 7 Update 6 Developer Previewrelease has been announced on the Official Oracle Linux Blog; getting started is quick and easy! If you have not done so yet, you will need to download...

OOW - Oracle Open World

OOW 2018: Oracle's Systems Strategy for Cloud and On-Premises Keynote!

"In this session hear about the latest directions and developments in Oracle systems products and technologies, spanning public cloud services to on-premises deployments of engineered systems, servers, storage, systems software, and more. Attendees gain technical insights into what's being built in Oracle engineering to enable you to make the best infrastructure decisions and gain better performance, efficiency, security, and availability for your critical workloads. Additionally, hear firsthand the overall strategy for Oracle systems to help you align your future projects with the leading-edge technology from Oracle, whether you are making plans to deploy in the cloud, on-premises, or integrate in between." This is the abstract of the Product Keynote Session we're going to have at Oracle Open World 2018, Keynote that will be presented by: Wim Coekaerts, Senior Vice President, Operating Systems and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle Ali Alasti, Senior Vice President, Hardware Engineering, Oracle Edward Screven, Chief Corporate Architect, Oracle Check what is going to happen tomorrow and which are the best solutions today! Get registered to this important Keynote to learn more about how your business can get advantage of those technologies during the Oracle Open World "Oracle's Systems Strategy for Cloud and On-Premises Keynote Session" at Oracle Open World on Monday, Oct 22, 3:45PM at The Exchange @ Moscone South - The Arena. To learn more about Oracle Linux and to speak with product experts, visit the Oracle Infrastructure Technologies showcase, booth #120, located in Moscone South, on the right side, just past the Autonomous Database showcase. See you there!

"In this session hear about the latest directions and developments in Oracle systems products and technologies, spanning public cloud services to on-premises deployments of engineered systems,...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle Linux and Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel (UEK) Releases

I've decided to create this blog entry just to share Oracle Linux and UEK releases, how those are associated and which UEK releases are available on different OL versions. So, maybe, this article could be useless for many people who already know which UEK releases are available on each OL release but, at the same time, could be helpful for many others approaching Oracle Linux: OL Release Initial UEK kernel Initial RHCK kernel UEK2 supported UEK3 supported UEK4 supported UEK5 supported               OL6U0 kernel-uek-2.6.32-100.28.5 kernel-2.6.32-71 No. OL6U2 required No. OL6U5 required No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U1 kernel-uek-2.6.32-100.34.1 kernel-2.6.32-131.0.15 No. OL6U2 required No. OL6U5 required No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U2 kernel-uek-2.6.32-300.3.1 kernel-2.6.32-220 Yes No. OL6U5 required No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U3 kernel-uek-2.6.39-200.24.1 kernel-2.6.32-279 Yes, default No. OL6U5 required No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U4 kernel-uek-2.6.39-400.17.1 kernel-2.6.32-358 Yes, default No. OL6U5 required No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U5 kernel-uek-3.8.13-16.2.1 kernel-2.6.32-431 Yes Yes, default No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U6 kernel-uek-3.8.13-44.1.1 kernel-2.6.32-504 Yes Yes, default No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U7 kernel-uek-3.8.13-68.3.4 kernel-2.6.32-573 Yes Yes, default No. OL6U8 required Not Available OL6U8 kernel-uek-4.1.12-37.4.1 kernel-2.6.32-642 Yes Yes Yes, default Not Available OL6U9 kernel-uek-4.1.12-61.1.28 kernel-2.6.32-696 Yes Yes Yes, default Not Available OL6U10 kernel-uek-4.1.12-124.16.4 kernel-2.6.32-754 Yes Yes Yes, default Not Available               OL7U0 kernel-uek-3.8.13-35.3.1 kernel-3.10.0-123 Not Available Yes, default No. OL7U3 required No. OL7U5 required OL7U1 kernel-uek-3.8.13-55.1.6 kernel-3.10.0-229 Not Available Yes, default No. OL7U3 required No. OL7U5 required OL7U2 kernel-uek-3.8.13-98.7.1 kernel-3.10.0-327 Not Available Yes, default No. OL7U3 required No. OL7U5 required OL7U3 kernel-uek-4.1.12-61.1.18 kernel-3.10.0-514 Not Available Yes Yes, default No. OL7U5 required OL7U4 kernel-uek-4.1.12-94.3.9 kernel-3.10.0-693 Not Available Yes Yes, default No. OL7U5 required OL7U5 kernel-uek-4.1.12-112.16.4 kernel-3.10.0-862 Not Available Yes Yes, default Yes NB: RHCK acronym states for Red Hat Compatible Kernel. As you maybe already know, Oracle Linux also supports ARM64 architecture: OL Release Initial UEK kernel Initial RHCK kernel UEK2 supported UEK3 supported UEK4 supported UEK5 supported OL7U5 - ARM64 kernel-uek-4.14.35-1818.0.9 Not Available No No No Yes, default You can find further details on Oracle Linux 7.5 for ARM64 architecture on our Linux Blog. Related to the Kernel I also want to specify something important related to the UEK acronym and releases associated: Kernel Release UEK Acronym Latest Release OL6 Latest Release OL7 2.6.32 UEK Oracle Linux 6 Not Available 2.6.39 UEK2 Oracle Linux 6 Not Available 3.8.13 UEK3 Oracle Linux 6 Oracle Linux 7 4.1.12 UEK4 Oracle Linux 6 Oracle Linux 7 4.14.35 UEK5 Not Available Oracle Linux 7 Further information: UEK, the Open, Easy, Secure Linux Kernel for Enterprise Clouds UEK Development and Source-Code available on GitHub I'll do my best to keep those information updated and, in the meanwhile, feel free to leave your comments here!

I've decided to create this blog entry just to share Oracle Linux and UEK releases, how those are associated and which UEK releases are available on different OL versions. So, maybe, this article...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle VM 3.4: build your own Oracle VM Templates for Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine

As you know on Oracle VM you can find different ready-to-run Appliances or Templates based on Oracle Linux. Oracle VM Templates allows to configure a Virtual-Machine on the first boot and apply configurations like: Hostname Network Boot Protocol (DHCP or STATIC) Network IP Address Network Subnet Mask Network Gateway Network DNS Servers root (Administrator) Password .....and more! This blog article will show how-to create the same kind of automation (with examples) for Microsoft Windows OS. Requirements: Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine running on Oracle VM Server Oracle VM Windows PV Drivers installed on the Virtual Machine (latest 3.4.x Release) ovm-template-config.zip package available on the Virtual Machine Step-by-Step How To: Extract "ovm-template-config.zip" under the Oracle VM Windows PV Drivers Folder "C:\Program Files (x86)\Oracle Corporation\Oracle VM Windows PV Drivers" Verify that you have a Virtual-NIC configured and named "LAN"; if not, change the name to "LAN" On the same window you can also verify that the Virtual-NIC is an "Oracle VM Virtual Ethernet Adapter" that means Windows is correctly using Windows PV Drivers. Apply all the customization required on your Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine; consider that the deployment automation will execute: "Sysprep /generalize /mode:vm" -- see Microsoft "Sysprep" documentation for further details Enable the Microsoft Windows Task "ovm-template-config" by executing following "Windows Registry" file: "C:\Program Files (x86)\Oracle Corporation\Oracle VM Windows PV Drivers\ovm-template-config\enable-ovm-template-config.reg" (double-click on it to execute and confirm as in the example below) Shutdown your Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine by Oracle VM Manager Create an Oracle VM Template (or Virtual Appliance) starting from the Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine by Oracle VM Manager Now your Oracle VM Template for Microsoft Windows is ready to be used and by leveraging the same you can automate the deployment of Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine on your Oracle VM Infrastructure; here the example of a Microsoft Windows Server 2016 deployment: Create a Virtual Machine starting from your desired Oracle VM Template or Virtual Appliance Configure the Virtual Machine based on your requirements (CPU, RAM, Disk, Network); consider that one vNIC is required Start the Virtual Machine created and proceed with the deployment automation In the following diagram you can see how the deployment process works By using your preferred Oracle VM Manager interface (WS-API, CLI or BUI) send the expected messages to proceed to the configuration Here a couple of examples based on Oracle VM Manager CLI ​With STATIC IP Address sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.hostname message=win2k16-static log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.bootproto message=STATIC log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.admin.password message=Welcome2 log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.ipaddr message=128.0.0.1 log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.netmask message=255.255.255.0 log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.gateway message=128.0.0.254 log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.dns message=128.0.0.101,128.0.0.102 log=yes With DHCP Enabled sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.hostname message=win2k16-dhcp log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.network.bootproto message=DHCP log=yes sendVmMessage VM name=win2016srv key=com.oracle.windows.admin.password message=Welcome3 log=yes Consider following requirements while sending VM Messages for different values: "com.oracle.windows.network.bootproto" accepts only "DHCP" and "STATIC", both uppercase "com.oracle.windows.admin.password" accepts only passwords >= 8 characters with at least 1 uppercase and 1 number "com.oracle.windows.network.dns" accepts not more than 2 entries supplied into an unique string (no spaces) as in the example above This deployment automation has been tested on Microsoft Windows Server 2016; possible adjustments could be required on other supported Microsoft Windows Operating Systems. The Microsoft Windows Virtual Machine will execute the following steps: Boot Start "ovm-template-config" batch in the background waiting for Oracle VM Messages Intercept the Oracle VM Messages coming from Oracle VM Manager interface Execute the proper configuration on the Virtual Machine based on VM Messages received Disable "ovm-template-config" batch on boot Reboot the Virtual Machine to reflect the changes applied I also think that this solutions can be easily improved and/or extended, so feel free to add you comments on this blog entry! Oracle VM Resources: Oracle VM Software Download Oracle VM can be downloaded, used and distributed free of charge, and all updates and errata are freely available. Instructions to download the Oracle VM Release 3.4.5, Oracle VM Windows PV drivers, tools, and utilities can be found on the Oracle Technology Network. Oracle VM Support Oracle VM Support offers access to award-winning Oracle support resources and virtualization support specialists, zero-downtime updates using Ksplice, additional management tools such as Oracle Enterprise Manager, and lifetime support, all at a low cost. Additional Oracle VM Information For the latest product information, best practices white papers and webinars, please visit Oracle Virtualization HomePage. The latest education and training information for Oracle VM can be found on a recent Virtualization Blog entry here. 

As you know on Oracle VM you can find different ready-to-run Appliances or Templates based on Oracle Linux. Oracle VM Templates allows to configure a Virtual-Machine on the first boot and...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle VM 3.4: collect VM statistics by Oracle VM messaging system

Based on a customer request, I've built a very simple solution on how to collect custom information and/or statistics on VMs running on Oracle VM 3.4; the same solution can be used by any 3rd party utility with the target to collect any kind of information from Virtual Machines running on Oracle VM 3.4. The entire process is based on Oracle VM messaging system, a solution able to grant messages between the Host (Oracle VM dom0), the Oracle VM Manager and the Virtual Machine running on the same architecture; the solution I'm going to propose here is displayed in the picture below: So, by leveraging a simple batch running within the VM (possibly scheduled by OS scheduler) I can collect a specific information and get the same shared and available by Oracle VM Manager interfaces (WS-API, CLI and BUI). Requirements to get this setup correctly working: On Linux VMs, install "ovmd" RPM and verify that proper service is running. On Microsoft Windows VMs, install WinPV Drivers for Oracle VM and verify that proper service is running. In the example below, I'm going to collect the VM Memory available information for a VM running: Linux Example FreePhysicalMemory=`cat /proc/meminfo |grep "MemAvailable" |awk '{print $2}’` ovmd -p FreePhysicalMemory=$FreePhysicalMemory MS Windows Example set echo off set PATH=%PATH%;C:\Program Files (x86)\Oracle Corporation\Oracle VM Windows PV Drivers; for /f "skip=1" %%v in ('wmic os get freephysicalmemory') do (   set m=%%v   goto :done ) :done ovmcmd_64.exe sendmessage FreePhysicalMemory %m%   Then by the Oracle VM Manager (here an example from CLI) I can get the information shared: Oracle VM Manager CLI OVM> getVmReceivedMessages Vm name=win10efi Command: getVmReceivedMessages Vm name=win10efi Status: Success Time: 2018-08-06 16:28:35,252 CEST Data:   Key:FreePhysicalMemory  Value:7234412 OVM> OVM> getVmReceivedMessages Vm name=ol7-rpmbuild Command: getVmReceivedMessages Vm name=ol7-rpmbuild Status: Success Time: 2018-08-06 16:33:13,884 CEST Data:   Key:FreePhysicalMemory  Value:1435982 OVM> and here an other example from Oracle VM Manager BUI: Here we saw an example related to the memory availability but by leveraging the same method you can collect all the information required. As usual, feedback and comment are welcome!

Based on a customer request, I've built a very simple solution on how to collect custom information and/or statistics on VMs running on Oracle VM 3.4; the same solution can be used by any 3rd...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle Linux is truly Open: Spread the Message!

Last week I attended the OpenExpo event in Madrid, the annual Open Source and Free Software Conference in Europe. It has been a great experience where I had the opportunity to talk with so many people working and/or collaborating on different open-source projects. At the same time I also had the opportunity to talk on Oracle Linux with a dedicated session. And, as expected, most of the people I've talked with, was not aware of the many capabilities and options available on Oracle Linux; so this is why I used the title "Spread the Message"!!! Oracle Linux, today, is really an Enterprise&Open Linux Distribution: It's free to use It's free to distribute It's free to update All the ISO(s) and Errata(s) are public available and do not require any kind of support subscription and/or account; so, the same updates you can have with support subscriptions are also available for free to everyone! Lately so many things has been added for free: Production Ready components Oracle OpenStack 4.0 - see Documentation Library Spacewalk 2.7 - see Documentation Library Software Collection Library 3.0  - see Release Notes Test & Development components (not for Production use) Developer Preview for UEK5 Preview and Developer Packages (RPMs) EPEL Yum Repository (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux signed by Oracle) Gluster 3.12 Oracle Linux for ARM Obviously, Oracle Linux Premier Support Subscription also includes further Enterprise Features and Options: Ksplice for zero-downtime diagnostics and patching (Kernel and UserSpace) - see Ksplice User's Guide Oracle Clusterware, the foundation of Oracle RAC, able to manage Oracle and non-Oracle applications - see Oracle Clusterware overview Corosync and PaceMaker (on Oracle Linux 7) support - see Administrator's Guide Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c Cloud Control support for Oracle Linux management KVM hypervisor support Docker support Kubernetes support Oracle OpenStack support Spacewalk support Dtrace support and I'm sure, the huge list above is still not complete!!! For further information about Oracle Linux you can start from here!  

Last week I attended the OpenExpo event in Madrid, the annual Open Source and Free Software Conference in Europe. It has been a great experience where I had the opportunity to talk with so many people...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Openexpo Europe 2018 and Oracle Linux: see you in Madrid on June 6th

On Wednesday, June 6th I'll be in Madrid for the Openexpo Europe, the leading annual Open Source and Free Software Conference in Europe. It will be my honor to take part to this great event and, at the same time, talk on cool things we're doing around Linux and Virtualization; the session "Oracle Linux: foundation for the Open Cloud" will deep dive on what Oracle is doing on the open ecosystem for everything related to the infrastructure as Oracle Linux, Oracle VM, Kubernetes, Openstack, Ksplice, VirtualBox and more. Abstract of the same is: "The choices you make today will impact your future cloud success. Oracle Linux, the foundation of the public Oracle Cloud, is fully tested and proven by running more than 61 billion transactions a day. Operating systems, management solutions, containers and virtualization are the fundamental building blocks of modern IT infrastructure. Oracle combines them all into one integrated offering: Oracle Linux. Operating on your choice of hardware, in your data center or in the Oracle Cloud, Oracle Linux provides the reliability, scalability, security, and performance for demanding enterprise workloads. #linux #cloud #virtualization #kubernetes #openstack #oraclevm #ksplice #oracle #trulyopen #rebootless" This is the 5th edition and it offers a two day (June 6th and 7th) event for the professionals and technology enthusiast with a special interest in Open Source technologies and the new ways to develop the digital transformation of their business. The aim of OpenExpo is to spread, present, discover and evaluate the solutions and trends of the industry offered by Open Source & Open Software and Open World Economy (Open Data and Open Innovation). You can find further details related to the event on openexpoeurope.com website and on my own session at this link. Hope to see you in Madrid!

On Wednesday, June 6th I'll be in Madrid for the Openexpo Europe, the leading annual Open Source and Free Software Conference in Europe. It will be my honor to take part to this great event and, at...

Oracle

Oracle Code 2018: meet you in Warsaw May, 11th.

On Friday, May 11th I'll be in Warsaw for the next Oracle Code 2018 event. My session, "Practical DevOps with Linux and Virtualization", will be a practical, and live, hands-on example of how to implement Infrastructure as Code and build repeatable development building blocks for both solo developers and teams. Replace hand built one-off development runtimes and say good-bye to it works on my machine! This session shows building a DevOps toolchain suitable for deploying an automated Docker infrastructure for microservices across multiple virtualization and cloud environments. Tooling includes Docker, Vagrant, Oracle Linux, git and Node.js. Oracle Code is a free event for developers to learn about the latest developer technologies, practices, and trends. Learn from technical experts, industry leaders, and other developers in keynotes, sessions, and hands-on labs. Experience cloud development technology in the Code Lounge with workshops and other live, interactive experiences and demos. All the details related to this session in Warsaw and all the other sessions that will happen worldwide are available here. Here the Agenda of what I'm going to discuss: What is DevOps ? Why is now the time for DevOps ? What is Oracle VM VirtualBox ? What is Vagrant ? What is Oracle Linux ? How can I start with Vagrant, VirtualBox and Oracle Linux ? Demo References, Q&A The session will be in the morning: See you in Warsaw!

On Friday, May 11th I'll be in Warsaw for the next Oracle Code 2018 event. My session, "Practical DevOps with Linux and Virtualization", will be a practical, and live, hands-on example of how...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle GitHub Vagrant Boxes: Oracle Linux 7 LAMP stack, ready-to-run!

By Googling you can find different how-to's to build, install and configure a LAMP stack on different Linux distributions. Most of you should already know but LAMP is an acronym that means Linux, Apache, MySQL and PHP (or Perl, or Python); on this kind of stack there are so many solution(s) built on-top and, maybe, the most famous one is Wikipedia. Today, I'm going to share with you a ready-to-run Vagrant Box, based on Oracle Linux 7, Software Collections 3.0 and MySQL 5.7 Community Edition. The huge difference between this LAMP stack and others is that everything is configured, ready-to-run and updated to the latest releases; so, you do not have to worry about the configuration of OL7, Yum-Channels and installation of different pieces of software; this vagrant box will manage everything!!! At the end, thanks to the configuration of "Software Collection Library 3.0" you'll have: Apache Web Server 2.4.27 MySQL 5.7.21 PHP 7.1.8 Obviously, minor releases could change in the time due to the forced installation of latest packages available. Once booted, your VirtualBox virtual-machine will be automatically configured to expose the Apache/PHP service to the host operating system and a demo web-page is already there to verify that everything correctly works; so, by your host preferred browser just open "http://localhost:8080/info.php": It's our intention to continue to introduce further solutions on this GitHub repository, solutions that could help Developers to get ready-to-run environments with Oracle or non-Oracle products on-top. Actually you can find: Oracle Linux 6 - OS Oracle Linux 7 - OS Oracle Linux 7 with Oracle Database 11.2.0.2 (XE) Oracle Linux 7 with Oracle Database 12.2.0.1 (EE) Oracle Linux 7 with DockerEngine 17.12.0 Oracle Linux 7 with Kubernetes 1.9.1 Further information: Oracle VM VirtualBox - Download Vagrant - Download Vagrant - Getting Started documentation Oracle Vagrant Boxes - GitHub Repository Feel free to leave your comments on this blog entry!

By Googling you can find different how-to's to build, install and configure a LAMP stack on different Linux distributions. Most of you should already know but LAMP is an acronym that means Linux,...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle Linux 7.5 and UEK5 Preview: Vagrant Box now available!

As you maybe already know, on March 3rd we have announced the Oracle Linux 7.5 Preview on our Oracle Linux Blog and all downloads for Oracle Linux 7.5 Preview Release are now available on OTN. At the same time, an other important preview release has been announced: UEK 5 (Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel 5). So, thanks to these two announcement today you have the option to test and try future Oracle Linux 7.5 and UEK5 releases; this is why I've worked to build a ready-to-run environment based on our VirtualBox + Vagrant solution where with only two commands you can get: Oracle Linux 7.5 Preview + UEK5 updated to the latest package releases version available VirtualBox Guest Additions 5.2.8 installed As for all other development environment, you can find it on our Official Oracle Vagrant Boxes GitHub repository. To get the environment created, you can just follow the README file available on GitHub Oracle Vagrant Boxes Repository. Here an example: Execute "vagrant status" to check Vagrantfile status and install possible plugin(s) required Execute "vagrant up" that will execute following steps: Download, extract and start required image based on Oracle linux 7.4 Configure "Yum" for Oracle Linux 7.5 and UEK5 Preview Channels and execute the upgrade process. Install actual latest "VirtualBox 5.2.8 Guest Additions" Reload the Virtual Machine to get "OL 7.5 and UEK5" up&running And, after these two commands ("vagrant status" and "vagrant up") you have a ready-to-run Oracle Linux 7.5 with UEK5 Preview System: Feel free to leave your feedback here!

As you maybe already know, on March 3rd we have announced the Oracle Linux 7.5 Preview on our Oracle Linux Blog and all downloads for Oracle Linux 7.5 Preview Release are now available on OTN. At the...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle GitHub Vagrant Boxes: DockerEngine on Oracle Linux 7 now available!

Have you ever seen the message below on your Windows OS ? Hyper-V and Containers features are not enabled. Do you want to enable them for Docker to be able to work properly? Your computer will restart automatically. Note: VirtualBox will no longer work And how can I run the same automation that I also run on my production servers on different OS ? So, here the answer: a dedicated Vagrant Box, running Oracle Linux 7 with Docker on top of your Host Operating System; and it does not matter if you run MacOS, Windows or Linux, VirtualBox and Vagrant are the same products on all of them! Here the very easy steps to get this accomplished: Clone GitHub Oracle Vagrant Boxes Repository # git clone https://github.com/oracle/vagrant-boxes Change Directory to your desired Vagrant Box (DockerEnginer actually) # cd vagrant-boxes/DockerEngine Start the Vagrant Box (VirtualBox Virtual Machine) This step will download the Virtual Machine (Box) image, starts it and executes all the steps required to get "Docker" ready-to-run on top. # vagrant up Connect to the Vagrant Box running (VirtualBox Virtual Machine) # vagrant ssh Run your preferred Docker container within the Virtual Machine # sudo docker run -it oraclelinux:6-slim # sudo docker run -it oraclelinux:7-slim # sudo docker run -it ubuntu It's our intention to introduce further solutions on this GitHub repository, solutions that could help Developers to get ready-to-run environments with Oracle or non-Oracle products on-top. Actually you can find: Oracle Linux 6 - OS Oracle Linux 7 - OS Oracle Linux 7 with Oracle Database 11.2.0.2 (XE) Oracle Linux 7 with Oracle Database 12.2.0.1 (EE) Oracle Linux 7 with DockerEngine 17.12.0 Further information: Oracle VM VirtualBox - Download Vagrant - Download Vagrant - Getting Started documentation Oracle Vagrant Boxes - GitHub Repository Feel free to leave your comments on this blog entry!

Have you ever seen the message below on your Windows OS ? Hyper-V and Containers features are not enabled. Do you want to enable them for Docker to be able to work properly?Your computer will restart...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.2: unattended Guest OS install

VirtualBox 5.2 introduced a very cool enhancement: unattended Guest OS installation. Thanks to this feature you can get a Virtual Machine automatically and completely installed without human intervention; the same feature, between the others, also grants to have an identical Virtual Machine each time you decide to install the Operating System.   Here a quick example on how-to get an unattended Guest OS install: Create the Virtual Machine, achievable by CLI or GUI # VM="Win10-autoinstall" # VBoxManage createvm --name $VM --ostype "Windows10_64" --register       Setup Virtual Storage/Disks for the Virtual Machine, achievable by CLI or GUI # VBoxManage createhd --filename /VirtualBox/$VM/$VM.vdi --size 32768 # VBoxManage storagectl $VM --name "SATA Controller" --add sata --controller IntelAHCI # VBoxManage storageattach $VM --storagectl "SATA Controller" --port 0 --device 0 --type hdd --medium /VirtualBox/$VM/$VM.vdi # VBoxManage storagectl $VM --name "IDE Controller" --add ide # VBoxManage storageattach $VM --storagectl "IDE Controller" --port 0 --device 0 --type dvddrive --medium /u01/Software/en_windows_10_pro_10240_x64_dvd.iso                 Define Misc settings for the Virtual Machine (optional) # VBoxManage modifyvm $VM --ioapic on # VBoxManage modifyvm $VM --boot1 dvd --boot2 disk --boot3 none --boot4 none # VBoxManage modifyvm $VM --memory 8192 --vram 128         Virtual Machine unattended configuration # VBoxManage unattended install $VM --iso=/u01/Software/en_windows_10_pro_10240_x64_dvd.iso --user=scoter --full-user-name="Mr. Coter" --password secret --key "your-windows-key" --install-additions --time-zone=UTC ​       Start the Virtual Machine to get your guest OS installed # VBoxManage startvm $VM --type headless     Ok, now you can have your coffee/tea break while waiting to the your Virtual Machine installed and ready to use. Thanks to this feature you can get different OS automatically and installed by 10 lines of scripting and by sharing the same code to others, everyone will have the same identical Virtual Machine running on top of VirtualBox; on this blog article we saw an example related to Microsoft Windows OS but the same concept also applies to different Linux distributions and others. Further details on "Unattended Guest OS Install" are available on official Oracle VM VirtualBox documentation here!

VirtualBox 5.2 introduced a very cool enhancement: unattended Guest OS installation. Thanks to this feature you can get a Virtual Machine automatically and completely installed without human...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

Windows PV Driver 3.4.3 for Oracle VM: it's time to upgrade!

Oracle VM 3.4 is part of Microsoft SVVP (Server Virtualization Validation Program) so, it's one of the virtualization solution validated by Microsoft. For Microsoft Windows OS we also deliver dedicated drivers to grant the best experience possible while running Microsoft Windows on Oracle VM; on January 22 2018 we've announced updated Windows PV Drivers 3.4.3. This updated WinPV release, signed by Microsoft as well as previous 3.4.2 release, introduces a huge list of enhancements and also the official support for Microsoft Windows Server 2016. Before starting with the upgrade of the installed Windows PV Driver you can always verify the release already installed by "Device Manager": Network ​ Disk Controller ​ If you're upgrading from WinPV Driver Release 3.4.1, please consider to follow this guide before upgrading. Driver installation and/or upgrade is very easy; just download the updated driver and run the "Setup.exe": and, once completed, reboot your Microsoft Windows virtual machine. Once rebooted, it's always suggested to verify the correct driver release has been installed: Network ​ Disk Controller ​ Again, consider to upgrade to this release where you'll find important enhancements for Microsoft Windows running on Oracle VM. Further details related to Microsoft Windows PV Drivers: Windows PV Driver 3.4.3 Release Announcement Windows PV Driver 3.4.3 Official Documentation Windows PV Driver 3.4.3 Download Feel free to leave your feedback on this article!

Oracle VM 3.4 is part of Microsoft SVVP (Server Virtualization Validation Program) so, it's one of the virtualization solution validated by Microsoft. For Microsoft Windows OS we also deliver dedicated...

Open Cloud Infrastructure

VirtualBox guest addition RPMs for Oracle Linux UEK4 kernel!

As you can see from this article from Wim Coekaerts, VirtualBox guest-additions for Oracle Linux are now available as RPMs. This kind of feature grant the best experience possible while building development environment on top of VirtualBox: no need to install kernel-devel, compilers or any other dev package on your machine to get guest-additions installed and available: just install those rpms, available for Oracle Linux 6 and Oracle Linux 7: "kmod-vboxguest-uek4" RPM contains the VirtualBox guest-additions kernel-modules for OL UEK4 while "vboxguest-tools" contains the complete user-space stuff (binaries, libraries and so on). To get those RPMs installed, proceed with the following steps: Enabled "ol7_developer" Yum repository: Verify that your VirtualBox virtual machine is using UEK4 kernel (you can also change your default for the next reboot) By Yum, install both RPMs on the Oracle Linux 6/7 virtual machine After a reboot, or with a proper module-load, you can verify: VirtualBox Kernel modules have been loaded VirtualBox Kernel modules version Play with VirtualBox shared-folders to verify it works Obviously, those RPMs will perfectly work even if you upgrade your UEK4 kernel (kmod); same modules will be available (and always granted) also on future releases of UEK4 kernel: I think that this could be last article for the 2017.....so, let me wish you an happy new year to everyone! Simon

As you can see from this article from Wim Coekaerts, VirtualBox guest-additions for Oracle Linux are now available as RPMs. This kind of feature grant the best experience possible while building...

OOW - Oracle Open World

Oracle Open World 2017: Sessions and Hands on Labs!

It's Friday....late evening here in Redwood Shores and I'm going to close my laptop soon but.....before leaving I feel the need to leave you what I'm going to present at the Oracle Open World 2017 that soon is going to start! On Sunday, October 1st, in the morning: Five Key Steps to Automating Your Workload Migration to Cloud  - SUN6469 Sunday, Oct 01, 10:45 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. | Moscone South - Room 152 Moving existing workloads from traditional virtualization technologies to the cloud can be daunting. However, the benefits far outweigh maintaining the status quo. In this session Oracle and Cloudbase take you through the five key steps to automating your cloud migration with minimum downtime. Learn how this can be done in a scalable and reliable way, avoiding the need for countless manual steps that are notoriously error-prone. Speakers: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle Alessandro Pilotti, Cloudbase Solutions, CEO On Monday, October 2nd, in the afternoon: Migration to the Oracle Open Cloud Infrastructure - HOL7552 Monday, Oct 02, 12:45 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. | Hilton San Francisco Union Square (Ballroom Level) - Continental Ballroom 3 In this hands-on lab learn different methods of migrating services running on legacy and proprietary virtualization solutions such as VMware to Oracle VM and Oracle Linux. Speakers: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle Christophe Pauliat, Principal Sales Consultant, Oracle Practical DevOps with Linux and Virtualization - HOL7554 Monday, Oct 02, 2:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. | Hilton San Francisco Union Square (Ballroom Level) - Continental Ballroom 3 In this session learn how to build a 100 percent reproducible environment that creates an up-to-date Oracle Linux 7 environment and requires no user intervention at all other than a single command. With Vagrant, VirtualBox, and Oracle Linux, you can easily build a consistent workflow to create a disposable Linux environment whose configuration and dependencies are isolated from your development machine on every platform (Windows, MacOS, or Linux). Speakers: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle Christophe Pauliat, Principal Sales Consultant, Oracle Honglin Su, Product Management Sr. Director, Oracle On Tuesday, October 3rd, in the afternoon: Automating Your Workload Migration to Oracle Cloud Infrastructure - THT8171 Tuesday, Oct 03, 4:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m. | The Exchange @ Moscone West - Showcase Theater 1 Moving existing workloads from traditional virtualization technologies to the cloud can be daunting. However, the benefits far outweigh maintaining the status quo. In this mini theater session learn the simple steps to automating your cloud migration with minimum downtime. Learn how this can be done in a scalable and reliable way, avoiding the need for countless manual steps that are notoriously error-prone. Speaker: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle On Wednesday, October 4th: Creating a Private Cloud in Minutes with Oracle Enterprise Manager and Oracle VM - HOL4739 Wednesday, Oct 04, 8:00 a.m. - 9:00 a.m. | Hilton San Francisco Union Square (Ballroom Level) - Continental Ball Room 5 This hands-on lab walks through managing and using a private cloud with Oracle VM 3.4 and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c. Learn how self-service users can deploy new virtual machines and new Oracle Databases in minutes from Oracle Enterprise Manager’s self-service portal. Also see how cloud administrators manage the private cloud, including the chargeback feature. Speakers: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle Christophe Pauliat, Principal Sales Consultant, Oracle Simon Hayler, Sr. Principal Technical Product Manager, Oracle DevOps Best Practices for Your Cloud Deployment - CON6743 Wednesday, Oct 04, 1:00 p.m. - 1:45 p.m. | Marriott Marquis (Yerba Buena Level) - Salon 13 Learn how to build a 100 percent reproducible environment that uses up-to-date Oracle Linux and requires no user intervention at all other than a single command. With Vagrant, VirtualBox, and Oracle Linux, you can build a consistent workflow to create a disposable Linux environment whose configuration and dependencies are isolated from your development machine on every platform (Windows, MacOS, or Linux). In this session Oracle experts share their experience and best practices using the latest utilities and features to have a real DevOps environment locally. At the same time, get ready for Oracle Cloud deployment. Speaker: Simon Coter, Director of Product Management, Oracle Hope to see you in one of my sessions above! Have a great Oracle Open World!

It's Friday....late evening here in Redwood Shores and I'm going to close my laptop soon but.....before leaving I feel the need to leave you what I'm going to present at the Oracle Open World...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox: Cloning from a given point in the snapshot tree

Continuing on the refresh of old VirtualBox articles, this quick blog entry is about a longer standing ability of VirtualBox when it comes to Snapshots and Cloning, and was prompted by a question posed internally, here in Oracle: "Is there a way I can create a new VM from a point in my snapshot tree?". Here's the scenario: Let's say you have your favourite work VM which is Oracle Linux based and as you installed different packages, such as database, middleware, and the apps, you took snapshots at each point like this: But you then need to create a new VM for some other testing or to share with a colleague who will be using the same Linux and Database layers but may want to reconfigure the Middleware tier, and may want to install his own Apps. All you have to do is right click on the snapshot that you're happy with and clone: Give the VM that you are about to create a name, and if you plan to use it on the same host machine as the original VM, it's a good idea to "Reinitialize the MAC address" so there's no clash on the same network: Now choose the Clone type. If you plan to use this new VM on the same host as the original, you can use Linked Cloning else choose Full.  At this point you now have a choice about what to do about your snapshot tree. In our example, we're happy with the Linux and Database layers, but we may want to allow our colleague to change the upper tiers, with the option of reverting back to our known-good state, so we'll retain the snapshot data in the new VM from this point on: The cloning process then chugs along and may take a while if you chose a Full Clone: Finally, the newly cloned VM is ready with the subset of the Snapshot tree that we wanted to retain: Hope this quick guide could help you on maintaining snapshots and creating clones!

Continuing on the refresh of old VirtualBox articles, this quick blog entry is about a longer standing ability of VirtualBox when it comes to Snapshots and Cloning, and was prompted by a...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1: 3D Acceleration for Ubuntu guests.

VirtualBox offers 3D acceleration by intercepting OpenGL requests made by the guest vm, and passing then down to the host's OpenGL library to be executed directly by the host.  To Configure a VM to use VirtualBox 3D acceleration: Make sure you install the Guest Additions into the Linux guest (Host+D); Enable 3D acceleration in the VM settings; Then simply start-up your Ubuntu guest. But on some platforms, and in some circumstances, the wrong renderers may be used by the guest OS which results in very slow 3d performance of the guest.   To check that you're using VirtualBox 3D acceleration on Ubuntu 16/17, type the following command: /usr/lib/nux/unity_support_test -p  If you see something like this: ... i.e. the OpenGL Renderer is NOT Chromium, then you are NOT using the VirtualBox OpenGL drivers. To get best performance possible, you have to install VirtualBox guest-addition within the VM; to accomplish this target you have to execute following steps: Install  required packages for building kernel modules. sudo apt install dkms build-essential module-assistant Prepare your system to build kernel module sudo m-a prepare In VirtualBox menu bar, select Devices => Insert Guest Additions CD image; at this point you'll be asked to run the software contained in it, click Run button: Once the guest additions have been installed, press Enter to close the terminal window and "reboot" your Ubuntu guest-machine. Once you do this, and then you reboot the guest you should re-rerun:  /usr/lib/nux/unity_support_test -p   Which hopefully will result in the Chromium renderers being seen to be used: And a consequence is that your Linux guest will be faster and smoother.

VirtualBox offers 3D acceleration by intercepting OpenGL requests made by the guest vm, and passing then down to the host's OpenGL library to be executed directly by the host.  To Configure a VM to...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox: Log files and how-to manage them.

One of the key tools you can use to diagnose any issues with VirtualBox is the VirtualBox log file for a vm session. VirtualBox always creates a log file which reflects the lifecycle of the virtual machine. VirtualBox log files live in a per-user/per-vm standard directory that will be something like: On Windows, this is "%HOMEDRIVE%%HOMEPATH%\\.VirtualBox\\Machines\\<vm name>\\Logs"; typically some- thing like "C:\\Users\\Username\\.VirtualBox\\Machines\\<vm name>\\Logs\\vbox.log" On Mac OS X, this is "$HOME/VirtualBox/Machines/<vm name>/Logs" On Unix-like systems (Linux, Solaris), this is "$HOME/.VirtualBox/Machines/<vm name>/Logs" The log files are rotated such that the most recent is always called vbox.log and older ones are vbox.log.[123]. These log files contain lots of information about the capabilities of both the host and the guest vm and should be provided whenever reporting issues with VirtualBox.  Log File Format  The layout of the logfile varies based on whether you are resuming or starting initially but roughly follows this pattern: Section Content Starts around Header VirtualBox version, Host OS information and Host Hardware information Beginning of file CFGM Dump A listing of the configuration information of guest (guest virtual hardware) \*\*\* CFGM dump \*\*\* Host Information (CPUID dump) Low level CPU information of Host and what will be reflected to Guest \*\*\* CPUID dump \*\*\* Creating the VM Information about the creation of the virtual machine environment \*\*\* End of CPUID dump \*\*\* Powering on or Loading from saved state When powering on you'll see very little in the logs at this stage.  If loading from a saved state, information from the Saved State Manager about matching previous state to current environment. Changing the VM state from 'CREATED' to 'LOADING' Resuming/Running Once the saved state is loaded, or the vm is booted, the guest code is executed. Changing the VM state from 'POWERING_ON' to 'RUNNING' or from 'LOADING' to 'RESUMING' or from 'SUSPENDED' to 'RESUMING' Guest lifetime This part of the log contains entries concerning the lifetime of the Guest. Changing the VM state from 'RESUMING' to 'RUNNING' Powering off or suspending A dump of the guest state at the time the vm was powered off. \*\*\* Guest state at power off \*\*\* Statistics The statistics collected during the session are dumped out. \*\*\* Statistics \*\*\* One important thing to consider, on VirtualBox logs, is the default timestamp format: 00:00:01.817 VRDP: TCP server listening on port 3389.   This is in the format HH:MM:SS.ms and is relative to the start of the vm. If you prefer to also have "wall clock time" you can set the environment variable before starting the vm: Linux/Solaris/OS X  export VBOX_RELEASE_LOG_FLAGS=time; VBoxManage startvm <vm-name>   Microsoft Windows  set VBOX_RELEASE_LOG_FLAGS=time; VBoxManage.exe startvm <vm-name>   New Feature, part of the latest VirtualBox 5.1. Starting from VirtualBox 5.1 release a further enhancement has been introduced while managing VirtualBox logs: VBoxBugReport. Thanks to this utility you have the ability to collect all the logs into one unique output file; options available are: Collect all the logs related to the VirtualBox installation (default) Collect all the logs related to a specific Virtual Machine or to a group of Virtual Machines (VirtualBox installation included) Collect all the logs related to all Virtual Machines registered (VirtualBox installation included)  

One of the key tools you can use to diagnose any issues with VirtualBox is the VirtualBox log file for a vm session. VirtualBox always creates a log file which reflects the lifecycle of the virtual...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox: Host-only Networking to run servers securely

Continuing on the update process of updating old "Fat Bloke" articles wrote in the past, here you can find the updated one dedicated to Host-Only Networking for VirtualBox. Since the initial blog about VirtualBox and Networking (Oracle VM VirtualBox: Networking options and how-to manage them), there have been lots of people asking how to run multiple server vm's on their laptops, allowing the host to also connect to these servers too. As it happens, I recently needed just such a configuration myself so thought I'd share how I did it... On my Oracle Linux laptop, I wanted to set up a private network within my host on which I would run: A Oracle Linux server running MySQL database, Apache webserver, and other stuff; A Windows Server 2016 providing DNS, DHCP and Active Directory; I also wanted my Linux laptop to be able to reach these guest machines on the private network, too.  Note that this had to be isolated to within my host machine because I was setting up a new Active Directory Domain (example.com) and we didn't want the Windows Server dishing out DHCP addresses to everyone in the office. But we did want the Linux Server to be able to talk with the Windows Server for directory services and name services. So logically this looked like: Creating the Windows Server VM I used the VirtualBox Manager to create a vm of OS type "Windows 2016 (64-bit)" but before running it for the first time, I modified the Network configuration of the guest to use the VirtualBox Host-only Ethernet Adaptor: I planned to use this Windows server to deliver DHCP addresses for the private host-only network, so I disabled the built-in DHCP server via the Preferences...Network dialog in the VirtualBox Manager (all this can be done form the command line too BTW). Like this: And in the interests of full disclosure, here are my private adapter settings too: I then installed Windows Server 2016 giving it a static IP address of 192.168.245.110 and name ad.example.com. After initial install I added extra roles to make the server be an Active Directory Domain Controller, DNS Server and DHCP Server: Creating the Linux Server The Linux server is an Oracle Linux (7.3) server. Again, I set the newly created vm to use a Host-only network (as above), and installed Oracle Linux, giving it  a static IP address: 192.168.245.111 - vdi1.example.com, and set DNS to point to the AD server ad.example.com.  This all worked swimmingly, and both machines could see each other and use each other's services: N.B. the servers running in these vm's are full blown instances so watch out for security settings and the like which block connections between them and the host. The Host as a member of example.com  The great thing about host-only networks is that the host itself sits on this network and so can partake in the fun. The host sees this network just as another NIC: $ ifconfig vboxnet0 vboxnet0  Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 0A:00:27:00:00:00           inet addr:192.168.245.1  Bcast:192.168.245.255  Mask:255.255.255.0           inet6 addr: fe80::800:27ff:fe00:0/64 Scope:Link           UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1           RX packets:0 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0           TX packets:2425 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0           collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000           RX bytes:0 (0.0 b)  TX bytes:643528 (628.4 KiB)   Note that the IP address the host uses is configured when you set up the host-only network above. Using Multiple NICs I wanted to update the Windows and Linux guests using Software Update, but to do that I needed access to the Internet, which my host only adaptor did not provide for me. One way of doing this is to temporarily switch from Host-only to NAT networking, do the update, then switch back again. And VirtualBox lets you do this while the VM is running which is very cool. But for my Linux VM I wanted something a bit more permanent. So I created a second Bridged virtual network adaptor so that my Linux VM had an address on my host's network as well as the example.com host-only network. To do this you do have to shutdown the guest OS, and then reconfigure the VM like this: The guest simply then sees this as another interface:  $ ifconfig eth0      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 08:00:27:31:23:9F           inet addr:hidden  Bcast:hidden  Mask:255.255.255.0           inet6 addr: hidden Scope:Link           UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1           RX packets:563846 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0           TX packets:360395 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0           collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000           RX bytes:347709416 (331.6 MiB)  TX bytes:260792184 (248.7 MiB) eth1      Link encap:Ethernet  HWaddr 08:00:27:4D:34:8B           inet addr:192.168.245.111  Bcast:192.168.245.255  Mask:255.255.255.0           inet6 addr: fe80::a00:27ff:fe4d:348b/64 Scope:Link           UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST  MTU:1500  Metric:1           RX packets:468955 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0           TX packets:387661 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0           collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000           RX bytes:354834569 (338.3 MiB)  TX bytes:104217032 (99.3 MiB)   Further Stuff Firewalls Server Operating Systems typically come as "secure by default" so watch out for firewalls blocking connections. As your host-only network is private anyway you could simply turn the firewall off, e.g. on Linux: /etc/init.d/iptables stop   Possible Nameserver Issue One issue that had me scratching my head for some time was that after I added a second interface to my Linux server, my name resolution stopped working. Eventually I figured it out: Linux has a feature called NetworkManager which detects new networks and reconfigures the system to use them. One of the results of this "reconfiguration" is an overwrite of the /etc/resolv.conf file which points to the nameservers. In my case this meant that the Linux server was no longer using the AD server for DNS. Linux experts could probably tell me how to elegantly fix this, but I found 2 solutions myself: Disable the Network Manager, so it will not restart at next boot. chkconfig NetworkManager off   Use entries in /etc/hosts and ensure that /etc/nsswitch.conf has the line: hosts: files dns   Conclusion I now have a very cool setup on my laptop which enables to play around with Oracle Linux, MySQL, Apache, Active Directory, and all the other services that Linux and Windows Servers offer, all without disturbing anyone else on the network.

Continuing on the update process of updating old "Fat Bloke" articles wrote in the past, here you can find the updated one dedicated to Host-Only Networking for VirtualBox. Since the initial blog about ...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox: Networking options and how-to manage them

Starting from the great blog article that Fat Bloke wrote in the past on this important Oracle VM VirtualBox component, I'm going to refresh the same for VirtualBox 5.1. Networking in VirtualBox is extremely powerful, but can also be a bit daunting, so here's a quick overview of the different ways you can setup networking in VirtualBox, with a few pointers as to which configurations should be used and when. Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1 allows you to configure up to 8 virtual NICs (Network Interface Controllers) for each guest vm (although only 4 are exposed in the GUI) and for each of these NICs you can configure: Which virtualized NIC-type is exposed to the Guest. Options available are: PCnet-PCI II (Am79C970A) PCnet-Fast III (Am79C973) Intel PRO/1000 MT Desktop (82540EM) Intel PRO/1000 T Server (82543GC) Intel PRO/1000 MT Server (82545EM) Paravirtualized network adapter (virtio-net) How the NIC operates with respect to your Host's physical networking. The main modes are: Network Address Translation (NAT) Bridged networking Internal networking Host-only networking NAT with Port-forwarding The choice of NIC-type comes down to whether the guest has drivers for that NIC.  VirtualBox, suggests a NIC based on the guest OS-type that you specify during creation of the vm, and you rarely need to modify this. But the choice of networking mode depends on how you want to use your vm (client or server) and whether you want other machines on your network to see it. So let's look at each mode in a bit more detail... Network Address Translation (NAT) This is the default mode for new vm's and works great in most situations when the Guest is a "client" type of vm. (i.e. most network connections are outbound). Here's how it works: When the guest OS boots,  it typically uses DHCP to get an IP address. VirtualBox will field this DHCP request and tell the guest OS its assigned IP address and the gateway address for routing outbound connections. In this mode, every vm is assigned the same IP address (10.0.2.15) because each vm thinks they are on their own isolated network. And when they send their traffic via the gateway (10.0.2.2) VirtualBox rewrites the packets to make them appear as though they originated from the Host, rather than the Guest (running inside the Host). This means that the Guest will work even as the Host moves from network to network (e.g. laptop moving between locations), and from wireless to wired connections too. However, how does another computer initiate a connection into a Guest?  e.g. connecting to a web server running in the Guest. This is not (normally) possible using NAT mode as there is no route into the Guest OS. So for vm's running servers we need a different networking mode.... NAT Networking characteristics: Guests sit on own private LAN VirtualBox acts as a DHCP Server VirtualBox NAT engine translates addresses Destination servers see traffic originating from VirtualBox host No configuration needed on Host or Guest Great when guests are clients Not good for guests as servers Bridged Networking Bridged Networking is used when you want your vm to be a full network citizen, i.e. to be an equal to your host machine on the network; in this mode, a virtual NIC is "bridged" to a physical NIC on your host. The effect of this is that each VM has access to the physical network in the same way as your host. It can access any service on the network such as external DHCP services, name lookup services, and routing information just as the host does. Logically, the network looks like this: The downside of this mode is that if you run many vm's you can quickly run out of IP addresses or your network administrator gets fed up with you asking for statically assigned IP addresses. Secondly, if your host has multiple physical NICs (e.g. Wireless and Wired) you must reconfigure the bridge when your host jumps networks. So what if you want to run servers in vm's but don't want to involve your network administrator? Maybe one of the next 2 modes is for you...or maybe a combination of more options, like one NAT vNIC + 1 Host-only vNIC..... Bridged Networking characteristics: VirtualBox bridges to Host Network Good for clients or server guests Consumes IP addresses May involve configuration of guest Best for production environments  Internal Networking When you configure one or more vm's to sit on an Internal network, VirtualBox ensures that all traffic on that network stays within the host and is only visible to vm's on that virtual network. Configuration looks like this: The internal network ( in this example "intnet" ) is a totally isolated network and so is very "quiet". This is good for testing when you need a separate, clean network, and you can create sophisticated internal networks with vm's that provide their own services to the internal network. (e.g. Active Directory, DHCP, etc). Note that not even the Host is a member of the internal network, but this mode allows vm's to function even when the Host is not connected to a network (e.g. on a plane). Note that in this mode, VirtualBox provides no "convenience" services such as DHCP, so your machines must be statically configured or one of the vm's needs to provide a DHCP/Name service. Multiple internal networks are possible and you can configure vm's to have multiple NICs to sit across internal and other network modes and thereby provide routes if needed. But all this sounds tricky. What if you want an Internal Network that the host participates on with VirtualBox providing IP addresses to the Guests? Ah, then for this, you might want to consider Host-only Networking... Internal Networking characteristic: Guests can see other guests on same internal network Host cannot see internal network Network configuration needed Functions even when Host disconnected Can be used in conjunction with Bridged Good for multi-tier solutions Host-only Networking Host-only Networking is like Internal Networking in that you indicate which network the Guest sits on, in this case, "vboxnet0": All vm's sitting on this "vboxnet0" network will see each other, and additionally, the host can see these vm's too. However, other external machines cannot see Guests on this network, hence the name "Host-only". Logically, the network looks like this: This looks very similar to Internal Networking but the host is now on "vboxnet0" and can provide DHCP services. To configure how a Host-only network behaves, look in the VirtualBox Manager...Preferences...Network dialog: Host-Only Networking characteristics: VirtualBox creates a private internal network for guests and host Host sees a new software NIC VirtualBox provides a DHCP server Guests cannot see outside world Guests function even when host disconnected Great for development Port-Forwarding with NAT Networking Now you may think that we've provided enough modes here to handle every eventuality but here's just one more... What if you cart around a mobile-demo or dev environment on, say, a laptop and you have one or more vm's that you need other machines to connect into? And you are continually hopping onto different (customer?) networks. In this scenario: NAT - won't work because external machines need to connect in. Bridged - possibly an option, but does your customer want you eating IP addresses and can your software cope with changing networks? Internal - we need the vm(s) to be visible on the network, so this is no good. Host-only - same problem as above, we want external machines to connect in to the vm's. Enter Port-forwarding to save the day! Configure your vm's to use NAT networking; Add Port Forwarding rules; External machines connect to "host":"port number" and connections are forwarded by VirtualBox to the guest:port number specified. For example, if your vm runs a web server on port 80, you could set up rules like this:    ...which reads: "any connections on port 8080 on the Host will be forwarded onto this vm's port 80".  This provides a mobile demo system which won't need re-configuring every time you connect your laptop to a different LAN/Network. Summary VirtualBox has a very powerful set of options allowing you to set up almost any configuration your heart desires.  For more information, check out the VirtualBox User Manual on Virtual Networking.

Starting from the great blog article that Fat Bloke wrote in the past on this important Oracle VM VirtualBox component, I'm going to refresh the same for VirtualBox 5.1. Networking in VirtualBox is...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1.20 now available for download!

Today I'm going to announce VirtualBox updated releases on my personal blog; as maybe most of you already know our Virtualization Blog is migrating to a new platform and will be back very soon. Oracle has released VirtualBox 5.1 Maintenance Release 20. This release includes improvements and regression fixes for Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1. Between them we can mention: GUI: fixed a possible crash when switching a multi-monitor VM into full-screen or seamless mode GUI: fixed non-literal shortcuts if the keyboard is not captured GUI: several mini-toolbar fixes in full-screen / seamless mode Windows Additions: another fix for automatic logins for Windows Vista and newer ICH9: fix for Windows guests with a huge amount (>64G) of guest memory BIOS: fixed El Torito hard disk emulation geometry calculation (thanks to Dwight Engen contribution) See all the details here with a complete list of bug fixes; here you can find all the links to download the software. Oracle has also released VirtualBox 5.0 Maintenance Release 38 and you can find further details available on Changelog for 5.0. VirtualBox 5.1.20 and 5.0.38 include all the security fixes part of "April 2017 Oracle CPU" and you can see all the details here.   The Oracle VirtualBox Team

Today I'm going to announce VirtualBox updated releases on my personal blog; as maybe most of you already know our Virtualization Blog is migrating to a new platform and will be back very soon. Oracle...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: using Oracle Ksplice on Oracle VM Server (dom0)

Oracle Ksplice is now available also for Oracle VM Server dom0.   This very interesting and cool utility, available on Oracle Linux from years, is now ready and able to work also on Oracle VM Server dom0. Thanks to Oracle Ksplice we can now install dom0 Kernel security updates without any need to reboot and, so, without any kind of impact to the VMs running on top; we perfectly know that on Oracle VM we can also live-migrate VMs.....but, maybe, applying security updates without migrating tens or hundreds of VMs is much faster. On this blog-article you can see a brief overview on how-to configure and use Ksplice for Oracle VM Server dom0.   To enable Ksplice on Oracle VM Server a “key access” is needed and, the same, can be obtained on www.ksplice.com website with your own account.   Download the install script on your Oracle VM Server (in case needed, export proxy environment variables to get access to ksplice.com website)  # wget -N https://www.ksplice.com/uptrack/install-uptrack     Run the install script downloaded with proper Ksplice key on Oracle VM Server dom0. # sh install-uptrack <your_ksplice_key>   Once the “uptrack” utilities have been installed, the installation will show possible updates available for the running kernel, as you can see in the picture below:     By executing “uptrack-upgrade -y” we can install all the security updates (CVE and others) # uptrack-upgrade -y   At the end of the installation you’ll see the effective kernel running on dom0   By executing commands like “uname” and “uptrack-uname” you can check the installed kernel release and the effective kernel running # uname -r # uptrack-uname -r Once we completed the installation of kernel security updates by Ksplice, obviously, without rebooting the Oracle VM Server dom0, it’s also always suggested to keep the system updated for possible future reboots of the system # yum-update -y So, by “yum” we also keep a consistent relation between the updated running Kernel, managed by Ksplice, and the possible kernel that will be picked-up in case of reboots. It's important to know that Ksplice will apply security updates also while rebooting but if the number of updates is too high you should have to wait much more time than expected.   Further interesting option, granted by Ksplice, is the possibility to rollback each single security update whenever needed, by "uptrack-remove" # uptrack-remove olkujtvy # uptrack-remove irrigrao And as you can see in the picture above, now the effective kernel moved from .28 to .27   By the website interface available on www.ksplice.com you can always evaluate updated status of your systems by one unqiue interface   For further information on Ksplice and Oracle VM:   Oracle VM: Using Ksplice Uptrack (Doc ID 2115501.1) Oracle VM 3.4 What’s New Oracle Ksplice website  

Oracle Ksplice is now available also for Oracle VM Server dom0.   This very interesting and cool utility, available on OracleLinux from years, is now ready and able to work also on Oracle VM Server...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4.2: why it's time to upgrade!

On September 21st, during Oracle OpenWorld 2016 in San Francisco, we announced Oracle VM 3.4.2 release.  Oracle VM 3.4.2 is the best x86 server virtualization release we have ever built. This release introduced new features and enhancements like: Support for NVM Express (NVMe) devices (both for repositories and devices presented to Guest VMs) Extended SCSI functionality available for virtual machines Linux guests can now retrieve vital product data (VPD) page 0x84 information from physical disks if the device itself makes it available dom0 kernel upgraded to Oracle Unbreakable Enterprise Kernel Release 4 Update 2 The Xen hypervisor performance and scalability updates: Improved memory allocation Improved aggregate performance Improved performance for Windows, Solaris and Linux guests Improved workload performance Guest disk I/O performance improvements Oracle VM Manager performance enhancements Oracle VM Manager Rule for Live Migration Hot memory modification for HVM guests with para-virtualized I/O drivers (PVHVM) Updated drivers for different HW devices available Security updates for the embedded components of Oracle VM Server and Oracle VM Manager  Why is it time to upgrade ? Oracle VM 3.4.2 is the first Oracle VM Manager release that introduced the option to manage older Oracle VM releases; so, while in the past you were used to "immediately" upgrade all Oracle VM Servers managed by the upgraded Oracle VM Manager, today you can complete your upgrade very quietly. Oracle VM Manager 3.4.2 can easily continue to manage older releases of Oracle VM Server while upgrade is running in the background for days or weeks; so while the upgrade target remains, the same does not have to be completed immediately. Oracle VM Manager 3.4.2 supports and can manage following Oracle VM Server releases:   3.2.10 and 3.2.11 3.3.1, 3.3.2, 3.3.3 and 3.3.4 releases 3.4.1 and 3.4.2 You can find further information at:   Oracle VM 3.4.2 release notes Oracle VM 3.4.2 installation and upgrade guide Oracle VM Manager support for previous Oracle VM Releases Oracle VM Server disk resizing utility from My Oracle Support    

On September 21st, during Oracle OpenWorld 2016 in San Francisco, we announced Oracle VM 3.4.2 release.  Oracle VM 3.4.2 is the best x86 server virtualization release we have ever built. This release...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: using Oracle VM Manager with Safari on a Mac.

  In the past I saw more than one request related to how-to access Oracle VM Manager web interface using Safari. Safari, for default, is the browser that automatically applies a huge list of security items while surfing the web (and obviously this is something very cool that also allows to keep safe our desktop/laptop system). However, sometime, it could happen that we cannot get access to a specific website, like Oracle VM Manager one, using Safari; this is principally due to the self-signed certificate installed, for default, on Oracle VM Manager and it's not a must to install a real-certificate on an internal web-app like Oracle VM Manager.  So, to fix this possible issue and get access to Oracle VM Manager using Safari on a Mac, execute following steps. 1. Using Firefox (and/or an other browser and/or an other system) get the certificate of your installed Oracle VM Manager; open Oracle VM Manager URL; on the left of your URL bar you'll see a  ; click on it and expand by selecting ">" 2. Click on "More information" and then select "View Certificate" 3. On "Certificate viewer" window, select "Details" tab and "Export..." to export your certificate. 4. Open "Keychain Access" and add the certified into the "Certificate" category (CMD+<space> and look for Keychain); click on Menu "File" => "Import Items..." and select exported certificate file. Once completed under "Certificate" category you should see an entry with your certificate. 6. Choose your certificate and with a right-click, select "Get Info"; on the "Info" window select "Always Trust" for "When using this certificate" Close the Window related to the certificate and confirm the change by supplying your user password. Once did, open Oracle VM Manager URL using Safari: Hope it helps; comments and feedback appreciated!                   

  In the past I saw more than one request related to how-to access Oracle VM Manager web interface using Safari. Safari, for default, is the browser that automatically applies a huge list of security...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: Network installation of Oracle VM Server (pxe boot, tftpboot, kickstart)

Installing multiple Oracle VM Server can be much easier with a Network Install Server. The same solution can be also an important component of a Private/Public cloud solution based on Oracle VM Server. The installation of a growing environment, in term of number of servers, can be safely automated using free opensource stuff like pxe boot, tftpboot, apache and kickstart. Following steps can be a good tutorial on how-to configure a Network-Install Server for Oracle VM; with this solution each bare-metal system will boot from the network and all the details related to the installation and first initial configuration will be automatically supplied by the Network-Install Server (that, obviously, can be also a VM); this service VM will be based on 4 main components:  • dhcpd - dhcp server that will provide an IP to the server on its first boot • httpd – Apache daemon that will provide Oracle VM Server software by network • PXE boot - daemon that will provide a kernel and a boot environment to the server • kickstart configuration file - the configuration of all operations that will be executed by the installing process of Oracle VM Server • software - Oracle VM Server 3.4 software On this example we will use an Oracle Linux 7 VM. 1. Pointing to Oracle Public Yum install following rpms on the OL machine # yum -y install rsync httpd dhcp tftp-server syslinux make perl openssl 2. Download custom pre-built binaries/configuration files from here 3. Extract files contained into tftpboot.zip as described below: # cd /var/lib # tar xvfz <path>/tftpboot.tar.gz 4. Download Oracle VM desired release (this procedure will show OVM 3.4.2) and copy the software content to the specific path (/var/lib/tftpboot/ovm3) # cd /var/lib # rsync –avz <OVM3_mounted_iso_path>/ /var/lib/tftpboot/ovm3/ 5. Configure apache daemon custom section to supply Oracle VM 3 software by http/https (pxeboot) # cd /var/lib/tftpboot/ovm3 # cp pxeboot.conf /etc/httpd/conf.d/ # systemctl enable httpd # systemctl start httpd NB: evaluate which is the listening port for your apache (default used here is 80) 6. Edit existing “kickstart configuration file and apply following needed changes. # cd /var/lib/tftpboot/ovm3 # vi 342.ks Software URL url --url=http://192.168.58.1/ovm3 è url --url=http://<your_apache_ip_address>:<your_apache_port>/ovm3 Network Configuration network --device=08:00:27:AC:10:C5 --activate --onboot=yes --bootproto=dhcp --hostname=demo342 --nameserver=192.168.58.1 è network --device=<NIC_MAC_ADDRESS> --activate --onboot=yes --bootproto=<dhcp/static> --hostname=<ovm_hostname> --nameserver=<dns-server(s)> Oracle VM Server Agent password ovsagent --iscrypted <your_ovsagent_pwd> è ovsagent --iscrypted <crypted_password_for_ovs-agent > Oracle VM Server root password rootpw --iscrypted <your_root_pwd> è rootpw --iscrypted <crypted_password_for_root> NB: to generate your crypted password you can execute: # openssl passwd -1 "password here" Oracle VM Server Timezone timezone --utc America/Los_Angeles è timezone --utc <your_tz> 7. Disable iptables / firewalld (or create custom rules if needed) # systemctl stop firewalld # systemctl disable firewalld #systemctl stop iptables # systemctl disable iptables 8. Configure dhcpd (DHCP Server) – see /etc/dhcp/dhcpd.conf example below allow booting; allow bootp; option option-128 code 128 = string; option option-129 code 129 = text; next-server 192.168.58.1; filename "pxelinux.0"; default-lease-time 600; max-lease-time 7200; ddns-update-style none; authoritative; log-facility local7; subnet 192.168.58.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 { range 192.168.58.150 192.168.58.200; option routers 192.168.58.1; } # add custom entry/dedicated ip for specific server #host newserver { # hardware ethernet 08:00:27:ac:10:c5; # fixed-address 192.168.58.100; # filename "pxelinux.0"; #} 9. Configure tftpboot – see /var/lib/tftpboot/pxelinux.cfg/default default menu.c32 prompt 0 timeout 300 ONTIMEOUT local menu title ########## PXE Boot Menu ########## label 1 menu label ^1) Install Oracle VM Server 3.4.2 + Xen + Kickstart kernel mboot.c32 append ovm3/images/pxeboot/xen.gz dom0_mem=max:128G dom0_max_vcpus=20 --- ovm3/images/pxeboot/vmlinuz ks=http://192.168.58.1/ovm3/342.ks --- ovm3/images/pxeboot/initrd.img Kickstart URL ks=http://192.168.58.1/ovm3/342.ks è ks=http://<apache_ip_address>:<apache_port>/<path>/<kickstart_conf> 10. Start & enable dhcpd and tftpboot services # systemctl start dhcpd # systemctl enable dhcpd # systemctl start tftp # systemctl enable tftp 11. Start your machine and proceed to the automated installation of Oracle VM Server As usual, feedback and comments are appreciated. 

Installing multiple Oracle VM Server can be much easier with a Network Install Server. The same solution can be also an important component of aPrivate/Public cloud solution based on Oracle VM...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: export Oracle VM Pool informations into a csv report file (UPDATED)

  The target of this script is to build-up a report of all Oracle VM Servers (OVS) managed by an Oracle VM Manager on one or more Oracle VM Pools. Following script is compatible with Oracle VM 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4. The output obtained is one csv file containing all the main informations related to all the OVS; the table will be composed of: Oracle VM Pool Name Oracle VM Server Name (hostname) dom0 UUID (Unique identified of dom0) Management IP (IP Address used on Management Network) Status (Running/Stopped/Maintenance) Memory (Amount of total Memory available on the physical system) dom0 Memory (Amount of Memory dedicated to dom0) NEW! VM Memory (Amount of Memory used by VMs) NEW! Free Memory (Memory available on the system for further domU) Socket (number of Socket(s) enabled on the system) Processors (number of CPUs available on the system - core/threads) CPU Compatibility Group (Group to evaluate the possible live-migration of VMs between Host systems) Oracle VM Release (detailed release of Oracle VM Server installed) Manufacturer/Model (Manufacturer and model of the physical server) Server Architecture (x86-64 or Sparc) Hypervisor (OVM/Xen or LDOM) Bios Release (Release of the BIOS installed on the system) Bios Release Date (Release date of the BIOS installed) Here you can find an example of output generated by this script: At the same time, into the same package, you'll find an updated version of "ExportVmDetails" script (presented here on June, 29th 2016). The script has been improved with following enhancements: Status of VM added to the report vDisk space used is now available also on Oracle VM 3.2 Release vDisk space max is now available also on Oracle VM 3.2 Release Physical Disk size is now available also on Oracle VM 3.2 Release The updated package can be downloaded here. Please pay attention of file "README_FIRST.txt" that will describe, step-by-step, how to install these scripts and have them configured in a couple of minutes. As always, feedback and comments are really appreciated.

  The target of this script is to build-up a report of all Oracle VM Servers (OVS) managed by an Oracle VM Manager on one or more Oracle VM Pools. Following script is compatible with Oracle VM 3.2, 3.3...

OOW - Oracle Open World

#OOW16 Session - Oracle VM Templates Best Practices for Rapid Oracle Database Deployment

Oracle OpenWorld 2016 will start on September, 18th. Second chapter of Virtualization Sessions is related to the Application Driven Virtualization: Oracle VM Templates Best Practices for Rapid Oracle Database Deployment [CON7430] Oracle VM's application-driven architecture is designed to enable rapid application deployment. Using Oracle VM Templates, sophisticated applications such as Oracle Database or Oracle Real Application Clusters can be deployed in minutes 10x faster than with other solutions. With more than 100 preconfigured, pretested templates for Oracle applications, Oracle has done the heavy lifting for you, enabling the virtualization of complex applications with near-zero application knowledge. In this session interact directly with Oracle experts with deep development experience, learn more use cases for Oracle VM Templates, and get in-depth knowledge to easily deploy Oracle Database 12c and Oracle RAC using Oracle VM Templates on the latest Oracle VM releases.  This session will be presente by me and my colleague John Priest, Product Manager Director for Oracle VM. Some of the pic(s) that will be presented during the session:   Rapid Application Deployment with Oracle VM Templates   Application Deployment on Oracle VM - Time comparison On the link above you can also register to this session! Hope to meet you over there!   

Oracle OpenWorld 2016 will start on September, 18th. Second chapter of Virtualization Sessions is related to the Application Driven Virtualization: Oracle VM Templates Best Practices for Rapid Oracle...

OOW - Oracle Open World

#OOW16 Session - Develop in VirtualBox and Deploy to the Cloud!

Oracle OpenWorld 2016 will start on September, 18th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented, you'll have the opportunity to attend session dedicated to Oracle Virtualization. These conference sessions allow you to hear from a wide variety of industry experts on how they're using they technology in real world deployments. First entry that I would like to present is: Develop with Oracle VM VirtualBox and Deploy to the Cloud [CON7428] Oracle VM VirtualBox is the world's most popular cross-platform virtualization software. Many people use Oracle VM VirtualBox to run multiple operating systems on their desktop machines (for instance, Windows, Linux, or Solaris on a Mac OS X system). And Oracle VM VirtualBox is used by developers around the world to develop, test, and build virtual appliances. In this session Oracle experts share their experience using Oracle VM VirtualBox to develop/test virtualization infrastructure, and get ready for deployment into Oracle VM Server and public clouds. Build an image on your own laptop/desktop and manage it to be available on Oracle Private and Public Cloud solutions; Some of the pic(s) that will be presented during the session:   VirtualBox, The on-premise solution for Developers      VirtualBox, The solution between Private & Public Cloud     Oracle Public Cloud Web Interface - uploading image created with VirtualBox     On the link above you can also register to this session! Hope to meet you over there!         

Oracle OpenWorld 2016 will start on September, 18th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented, you'll have the opportunity to attend session dedicated to Oracle Virtualization. These...

OOW - Oracle Open World

#OOW16 Hands-on Lab - Private Cloud with Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c

Second Chapter of Oracle OpenWorld 2016 - Oracle virtualization content: Managing and Using a Private Cloud with Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c [HOL6767]  In this session highly experienced Oracle experts walk you through managing and using a private cloud with Oracle VM 3.4 and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c. Learn how to deploy new virtual machines and new Oracle databases in minutes from Oracle Enterprise Manager's self-service portal. See how the cloud administrator can manage the private cloud, including the chargeback feature.  Concepts like Cloud-Administrator, Cloud-User, Image, Instance, Software Library, Charge-Back, IaaS, DBaaS and much more won't be anymore something unknown; here some good screenshot of activities that each attendant will have to execute: Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c - Login Interface Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c - Oracle VM Cloud Services Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c - Charge Back trend Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c - Charge Back Statistics & Details Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 13c - Charge Back automated reporting with BI Publisher Enterprise ....and here we are with OOW'16 Hands-on Labs dedicated to Oracle VM. Next week I'll talk more about Virtualization Sessions. Hope to meet you over there!

Second Chapter of Oracle OpenWorld 2016 - Oracle virtualization content: Managing and Using a Private Cloud with Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager 13c [HOL6767]  In this session highly...

OOW - Oracle Open World

#OOW16 Hands-on Lab - Oracle VM & OpenStack

  Oracle OpenWorld 2016 is fast approaching! If you are as excited as we are about the fascinating new Oracle virtualization content featured at Oracle OpenWorld 2016, you won't want to miss Sessions and HOL dedicated to Oracle VM, Oracle Linux and OpenStack. While the hands-on labs allow you to directly interact with Oracle virtualization products and Experts, the conference sessions allow you to hear from a wide variety of industry experts on how they're using they technology in real world deployments. First entry that I would like to present is: Build OpenStack IaaS Private Cloud with Oracle OpenStack for Oracle Linux and Oracle VM [HOL6765] This hands-on lab demonstrates how to build an OpenStack solution and exercise some of its key features using Oracle VM VirtualBox. See how the latest release of Oracle OpenStack for Oracle Linux has no requirement for a server or storage. The lab also shows the integration/management of Oracle VM Server 3.4 and how-to build a flexible cloud solution based on OpenStack 2.1 and Oracle VM 3.4. Concepts like Projects, Flavors, Instances, Images, Networks, Floating IPs and much more won't be anymore something unknown; here some good screenshot of activities that each attendant will have to execute: Oracle OpenStack 2.1 - Create Network   Oracle OpenStack 2.1 - Instances running on Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 Oracle OpenStack 2.1 - Manage Floating IP Associations for Instances Oracle OpenStack 2.1 - Network Topology defined within the Lab Oracle OpenStack 2.1 - Project overview and Resource usage summary This is just only the first entry and I'll talk more about other sessions and hands-on lab. Hope to meet you over there!

  Oracle OpenWorld 2016 is fast approaching! If you are as excited as we are about the fascinating new Oracle virtualization content featured at Oracle OpenWorld 2016, you won't want to miss...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1: VBoxBugReport & NVMHCI emulator

On July, 12th Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1 has been announced. This new release introduced new capabilities to the product and, between them, I'm going to speak on a couple:   Bug Reporting Helper tool NVMHCI storage controller emulation "Bug Reporting Helper" is a command line utility able to collect all the logs and informations related to:     Host operating system where VirtualBox has been installed Guest Virtual Machine logs (specific to one VM or for all VMs) Syntax of this utility is very simple and we can obtain all the options available by executing the command with the "-h" option: This type of utility can be very helpful while asking assistance on possible issues on VirtualBox; the same utility can be used to collect logs for "Service Requests" opened by VirtualBox Enterprise Customers on My Oracle Support or, at the same time, used to upload logs to community point-of-contact like VirtualBox Forum or VirtualBox Bug Ticketing System. "NVMHCI Storage controller emulation" introduced the option to have emulated Flash-Storage on a VirtualBox VM: This new option allows to emulate different solutions based on systems with NVMe (Non-Volatile Memory express). Between them, for example, we can also find Oracle solutions like Oracle Exalytics. Comments and feedback, as usual, are appreciated.               

On July, 12th Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.1 has been announced. This new release introduced new capabilities to the product and, between them, I'm going to speak on a couple:   Bug Reporting Helper tool NVMHCI...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: export VMs details into a csv report file (ExportVmDetails)

  ==> An updated release of this script is available here <== The idea of this script came up more than one time in the past and target is to build-up a report of all VMs managed by an Oracle VM Manager on one or more Oracle VM Pools. Following script is compatible with Oracle VM 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4.   The output obtained is one csv file containing all the main informations related to all the VMs; the table will be composed of:  Virtual Machine UUID (Unique ID) Virtual Machine Name Memory (amount of RAM allocated to the VM) Max Memory (Max amount of RAM allocable to the VM without reboot) Processors (Number of vCPUs) Max Processors (Max number of vCPUs) Processor Capacity (Increase or decrease the percentage to which the virtual CPUs can receive scheduled time) Processor Priority (The higher the priority, the more physical CPU cycles are given to the virtual machine) High Availability (H/A enabled or not for the VM) Operating System (Descriptive field related to the OS installed on the VM) VM Type (PVM, HVM or HVM with PV drivers) Repository (Oracle VM Repository where vm.cfg file resides) *vDisk Space Used (Disk space used by the vm - virtual-disks) *vDisk Space Max (Disk space allocable by the vm - virtual-disks) *Physical Disk size (Disk space used by the vm - physical-disks) * = these options are only available on Oracle VM releases 3.3 and 3.4; on Oracle VM 3.2 release these three columns will be valued with "N/A". The script, the install package and README file can be downloaded here.  Installation process is pretty easy; just execute command "install.sh" and follow the interactive shell: Last message of the installation package should be something similar to: "OVMCLI Session successfully connected with key-based authentication!!!"  like in the following picture:       The script "ExportVmDetails", available for default under path "/usr/local/bin" won't need any option and will supply an output similar to the following picture:   Obviously the same approach can be taken to generate further csv reports with all the informations related to an Oracle VM Pool. As usually, feedback and comments are very welcome.  If you need further informations, please visit:   Oracle VM documentation Best practices, white papers and webinars  

  ==> An updated release of this script is available here <== The idea of this script came up more than one time in the past and target is to build-up a report of all VMs managed by an Oracle VM Manager...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.2.11 maintenance release now available!

  Preamble: it's important to remember that today our latest Oracle VM 3.4 release has to be chosen while installing new environments and/or creating new architectures; that said, it's also important to know that we just released a maintenance update for Oracle VM 3.2 to deliver improved performance, security patches and to provide bug-fixes.  Oracle VM 3.2.11 updates are available for download from My Oracle Support. Oracle VM Server packages are also available from the Oracle Unbreakable Linux Network (Oracle VM Server 3.2 Latest Channel). The patch updates include all the cumulative bug fixes that have been integrated since the base 3.2.1 release.   Oracle VM 3.2.11 Download Information · Oracle VM Server for x86 3.2.11 server ISO, search patch ID 16410428; and will also available from ULN - https://linux.oracle.com · Oracle VM Manager 3.2.11 upgrade, search patch ID 16410417 · Oracle VM Agent 3.2.11 for SPARC, search patch ID 16694949 The software is also available from the Oracle Software Delivery Cloud.  Review the download instructions at: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/vm/downloads/index.html Additional Information New customers are encouraged to use the latest Oracle VM 3.4, release that introduces further features, improved stability and performance. Oracle VM documentation is available on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN):http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/vm/documentation/index.html. For the latest information, best practices white papers and webinars, please visit http://oracle.com/virtualization.

  Preamble: it's important to remember that today our latest Oracle VM 3.4 release has to be chosen while installing new environments and/or creating new architectures; that said, it's also important...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: identify orphan vdisks on repositories (find-vorph)

Identify orphan virtual-disks on repository can be a nightmare; mostly if you have more repositories and many virtual-disks to check.   What is it an orphan virtual-disk ? ==> An orphan virtual-disk is a virtual-device that is not associated to any virtual machine <== Why do I need to identify them ?   ==> Identify orphan virtual-disk can help to reclaim disk-space available on Oracle VM Repositories <== So, like on many other examples, scripting with Oracle VM CLI can help us; here you can find a script able to identify all orphan virtual-disks; and you have two different options:   verify orphan virtual-disk on a specific repository verify orphan virtual-disk on all repositories managed by Oracle VM Manager The script is also able to supply the amount of disk-space recovered by deleting all orphan virtual-disks on a specific repository; output of the script will also present the Oracle VM CLI commands to execute to remove all orphan virtual-disks. Script is compatible, able to interact and has been tested with:   Oracle VM 3.2 Oracle VM 3.3 Oracle VM 3.4    Here you can find some execution examples:   Script executed on a specific repository (orphan virtual-disks identified and recoverable space specified) Script executed on a specific repository (no orphan virtual-disks)   Script executed on all repositories (no repository specified) To proceed to the setup pay attention to the README file attached to the download.  Feedback and comments are, as always, appreciated.   

Identify orphan virtual-disks on repository can be a nightmare; mostly if you have more repositories and many virtual-disks to check.   What is it an orphan virtual-disk ? ==> An orphan virtual-disk is a...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4 script: schedule and move VMs to a different repository

Moving VMs from one repository to an other can be something boring, mostly if your VM has many vdisks or if you have to move many vms. On Oracle VM to completely move a VM you need to create a clone-customizer and specify target destination for each virtual-disk. So, on activities like:   storage replacement (new repositories) *** huge list of vms to move to a new repository vms to move to a new repository with tens of virtual-disks scheduled VM moving a batch approach can help to address them with an automated script able to create the clone-customizer and move the entire vm (vm.cfg file and all virtual-disks) to the destination repository.  *** In case of storage replacement this script does not manage the Oracle VM poolfs migration. Moving a VM is a tricky operation and more checks are executed by the script before starting with it; these are all the checks executed by the script before starting the "move" operation:   Execute the first connection to the manager using "expect", needed in case of reboot of Oracle VM Manager or client host Check VM Name is unique: you can have different VMs with the same name but we need to identify which one we have to move Check Server-Pool name and VM membership: verify that VM we are going to move is part of the pool specified Check target repository name: verify that target repository specified exists Check OVS that guest the vm: verify which Oracle VM Server actually guest the VM and if this server has target repository presented Check OVMCLI Release and features available: this script is compatible with Oracle VM 3.3 and 3.4 Check VM and all its components are not already on target repository: verify that everything is not already in place Verify disk space available on target repository: verify that on target repository there is enough space to guest the VM Check VM Status (running / stopped) and options specified (VM shutdown and VM restart) Once all these checks are verified the script executes following steps:   Create Clone Customizer for VM moving Prepare storage mappings for Clone Customizer created Prepare network mappings for Clone Customizer created Move VM to target repository and delete Clone Customizer Verify VM moving completed successfully Start the moved vm and verify it's started (optional) Script "MoveVm.sh" v0.3 can be downloaded here. "MoveVm.sh" script  has following characteristics:   Compatible with: Oracle VM 3.3 Oracle VM 3.4 Requires "expect" installed on the Linux system executing the script able to reach port 10000 of Oracle VM Manager host   Script flowchart graphically is: To see script syntax, just execute the script without any option: The script won't move "Virtual Cd-Rom" (ISO files) and/or manage physical disks. In the following example we have one VM (ol67test) where:   vm.cfg file is on repository named local_02 3 virtual-disks are on repository named local_02 1 virtual-cdrom is on repository named local_02 1 physical-disk is owned by the guest 2 vnic(s) are configured on two different networks Following example will move the entire VM (vm configuration file and all virtual-disks) to repository named local_01. Now the "moved" VM is configured with: vm.cfg file is on repository named local_01 3 virtual-disks are on repository named local_01 1 virtual-cdrom remains on repository named local_02 1 physical-disk is owned by the guest 2 vnic(s) are configured as before Log execution of this operation can be downloaded here.  Obviously all this stuff can be scheduled and, thanks to this OVMCLI script, moving VMs won't be anymore a tedious operation. Feedback and questions are obviously appreciated.           

Moving VMs from one repository to an other can be something boring, mostly if your VM has many vdisks or if you have to move many vms. On Oracle VM to completely move a VM you need to create...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: create custom install ISO with updated UEK4 kernel

Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 ISO package is dedicated to server installation but, to try it, maybe someone needs to install on a desktop/laptop environment (direct install on bare metal). It could happen that the default UEK4 kernel part of Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 build 1351, does not contain a particular fix and/or driver needed for old or newest hardware; a common problem, for example, could be related to particular graphic card available on modern desktop/laptop systems and while the installation correctly terminates, you aren't able to get console access to the system. So, the target of this guide, is to supply a step-by-step guide to build  your custom "Oracle VM Server" ISO package with an updated UEK4 kernel release where, maybe, the fix needed is already in place. In the example below, I'll pick-up updated kernel-uek packages for Oracle VM Server 3.4.1, actually available by yum.oracle.com ; the machine used for all this steps is based on "Oracle Linux 6.7 x86_64". RPMs/Packages needed to execute all the operation: createrepo rsync mkisofs Now we can start with the step-by-step how-to:  Mount the default "Oracle VM Server 3.4.1" ISO # mount -o loop /u01/OVS-3.4.1-1351.iso /media   Clone ISO content to a r/w directory # mkdir /u01/new_iso # rsync -avz /media/ /u01/new_iso/   Remove RPMs that will be replaced with updated release      # cd /u01/new_iso/ # cd Packages/ # rm -f kernel-uek-4.1.12-32.1.3.el6uek.x86_64.rpm # rm -f kernel-uek-firmware-4.1.12-32.1.3.el6uek.noarch.rpm     Copy updated RPMs (you can download them from yum.oracle.com if needed) # cd /u01/new_iso/Packages/ # cp /root/kernel-uek-* .     Rebuild file "listing" with updated entries due to changes above and verify differences # cd /u01/new_iso/Server/ # ls ../Packages/ > listing.new # diff listing listing.new # mv listing.new listing   Prepare to update YUM repository configuration and metadata files  # cd /u01/new_iso/Server/repodata/ # mv bdaef80f41c05cc39420d77d91edea91c3d726cb003ba168ce74b3a5580f06ba-comps-ovs-core.xml comps-ovs-core.xml   Update YUM metadata files and sqlite DBs # cd /u01/new_iso/Server/ # createrepo -g repodata/comps-ovs-core.xml .     Generate new ISO build pointing to the temporary directory # cd /u01/new_iso/ # mkisofs -o ../OVS-3.4.1-b1351_custom.iso -b isolinux/isolinux.bin -c isolinux/boot.cat -no-emul-boot -boot-load-size 4 -boot-info-table -J -R -V "OVS 3.4.1 custom-build" .   Test your custom ISO and verify the system correctly installs   To have one supported system is important to update all the packages pointing to correct Yum repository.  Update your Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 system pointing to yum.oracle.com # cd /etc/yum.repos.d # wget https://blogs.oracle.com/scoter/resource/blog21/ovm34_latest_x86_64.repo # yum update -y   "yum update -y" example    Feedback and question are obviously appreciated.     

Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 ISO package is dedicated to server installation but, to try it, maybe someone needs to install on a desktop/laptop environment (direct install on bare metal). It could happen...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: ovm-info command to get details within VM

Continuing on the path of the first "ovm-disk" command, here you can find one new tool available for your Linux guest-vms; target of this utility, named "ovm-info", is to supply main information of the running guest on:   VM information, like Hostname, VM-Name, VM-Type and repository that house it. CPU and Memory information (Max and used) Disk information like domU device and the corresponding dom0 device (virtual or physical) Network information like domU device and OVM Network configuration (id, dom0 net device and vlan-tag) Other informations like H/A enabled or not, Hugepages enabled or not and actions on different operations (reboot, crash etc) So with the same approach of the other script, specific for detailed reports on vdisks, we can install and execute this command on our running Linux guest and obtain this information by executing this command on the guest itself:   "ovm-info" command/script, once executed, query the Oracle VM Manager and obtains detailed info related to the device specified. There are some requirements to have it correctly working and these are:  "expect" installed on the Linux VM VM able to reach port 10000 of Oracle VM Manager host Compatible with Oracle VM 3.3 and 3.4 The package containing all-the-stuff can be downloaded here ; into this tarball-gzipped file you'll find: README_FIRST.txt (please, read it, it won't take more than 2 minutes) FirstConn.exp (expect script that executes first connection to the Oracle VM Manager CLI port) SetupSsh.exp (expect script that setup the self-authentication between the VM and Oracle VM Manager CLI) install.sh (bash script to execute to correctly setup the self-authentication) ovm-info (script that will be customized and copied by the install.sh process) NB: Once the setup is completed a copy of the command "ovm-info" will be saved under "/usr/local/bin" and you can remove the install package and its directory. Here you can find an example of the installation output (click on the image to get the entire log). Syntax: # ./install.sh <ovmm_host> <ovmm_oracle_linux_user_password> <ovmm_admin_manager_password> Once the setup is completed, following success message will appear: "OVMCLI Session successfully connected with key-based authentication!!!" Now you can remove the package and the installation folder and verify the "ovm-info" command path: Example output on "General Information" option (-g): Example output on "CPU and Memory" option (-c): Example output on "Virtual Disk" option (-d): Example output on "Network Information" option (-n): Example output on "Other Information" like H/A, HugePages and actions, option (-o): Last option "Show all VM information" (-a) query for all information and option above sequentially. Feedback and question are obviously appreciated. 

Continuing on the path of the first "ovm-disk" command, here you can find one new tool available for your Linux guest-vms; target of this utility, named "ovm-info", is to supply main information of...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: ovm-disk command to get disk details on Linux VMs

ovm-disk v0.3 updated on February, 16th - 2017  More than one time I received requests coming from customers or partners that would like to get the Page83 id of a LUN (presented to a specific VM) by executing a command on the VM itself; in fact, commands like "lsscsi" and "scsi_id" do not work on top of a Oracle VM Virtual Machine. In the picture above, one running VM, is not aware if a disk is physical or virtual; only dom0 (Oracle VM Server) really knows it. The other component, able to get information related to disks is Oracle VM Manager; so, by opening a communication channel between the guest-VMs and Oracle VM Manager CLI interface we can identify all the details related to our guest-disks. "ovm-disk" command/script, once executed, query the Oracle VM Manager and obtains detailed info related to the device specified. So the OVMCLI (Oracle VM Command Line Interface) script posted on this blog-post, allows to get this kind of information by executing a command on the Linux VM itself. There are some requirements to have it correctly working and these are:   "expect" installed on the Linux VM VM able to reach port 10000 of Oracle VM Manager host Compatible with Oracle VM 3.3 and 3.4       The package containing all-the-stuff can be downloaded here ; into this tarball-gzipped file you'll find:   README_FIRST.txt (please, read it, it won't take more than 2 minutes) FirstConn.exp (expect script that executes first connection to the Oracle VM Manager CLI port) SetupSsh.exp (expect script that setup the self-authentication between the VM and Oracle VM Manager CLI) install.sh (bash script to execute to correctly setup the self-authentication) ovm-disk (script that will be customized and copied by the install.sh process) NB: Once the setup is completed a copy of the command "ovm-disk" will be saved under "/usr/local/bin" and you can remove the install package and its directory. Here you can find an example of the installation output (click on the image to get the entire log). Syntax: # ./install.sh <ovmm_host> <ovmm_oracle_linux_user_password> <ovmm_admin_manager_password> Once the setup is completed, following success message will appear: "OVMCLI Session successfully connected with key-based authentication!!!" Now you can remove the package and the installation folder and verify the "ovm-disk" command path: Example output with a Virtual-Disk: Example output with a Physical-Disk: Example output with a Virtual-Cd-rom:  Feedback and question are obviously appreciated.           

ovm-disk v0.3 updated on February, 16th - 2017  More than one time I received requests coming from customers or partners that would like to get the Page83 id of a LUN (presented to a specific VM) by...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: install Oracle VM Server on EFI host

Between the others, Oracle VM 3.4 introduce the option to install the Server on an EFI system. Following steps will show how-to install Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 on a VirtualBox VM EFI based (as a demo and example environment); these steps could be interesting also because new modern HW is EFI based and newest models does not accept anymore to have legacy-BIOS available. First of all we have to create one VM dedicated to the installation; here you can find all the options selected and configuration in place: General => Basic   Name: <desired VM name> Type: Linux Version: Oracle (64-bit)  System => Motherboard   Base Memory: <desired memory amount> Boot Order: <leave default> Chipset: <leave default> Pointing Device: <leave default> Extended Features: <all selected> - see EFI System => Processor    Processor(s): <choose desired number of vcpu> Execution Cap: <choose desired vcpu capacity> Extended Features: <enabled>   System => Acceleration   Paravirtualization Interface: Legacy Hardware Virtualization: <all selected> Storage => Storage Tree     Controller: SATA Devices 1 vdisk dedicated to Oracle VM Server installation (I suggest 100GB dynamic vdisk) virtual cd-rom with Oracle VM Server 3.4 ISO connected   Now you can proceed to install Oracle VM Server; installation is very easy and there is no particular option to select. Once installed you'll see that the system, at first reboot, will automatically start the Oracle VM Server dom0; the problem really happens if you are going to stop the VM. In fact, once the VM stopped, if you are going to start it you'll see that the UEFI Interactive Shell v2.0 will be presented. To correctly boot Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 we need to specify the grub-efi configuration file with: fs0:\EFI\redhat\grubx64.efi Once Oracle VM Server 3.4 has completed the boot process we can now work to have it automatically booting. To have it, execute following steps:   Create "startup.nsh" file (default executed on UEFI VirtualBox VM) with: echo "\EFI\redhat\grubx64.efi" > /boot/efi/startup.nsh Verify that file "startup.nsh" is executable: ls -l /boot/efi/startup.nsh Example: From now on, Oracle VM Server will automatically boot on this VirtualBox EFI system without any kind of interaction.                           

Between the others, Oracle VM 3.4 introduce the option to install the Server on an EFI system. Following steps will show how-to install Oracle VM Server 3.4.1 on a VirtualBox VM EFI based (as a demo...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.4: guest hot backup on different repository (v0.8a)

Updated release of the script is now available at: Hands on Backup Utilities for Oracle VM 3.4 Not more than a couple of hours ago Oracle VM 3.4 has been announced on Virtualization Blog. Here you can find the new version ( 0.8a ) of the HotCloneVm.sh script.   Once downloaded, you'll find a zipped file containing: "SetupSsh.sh" script to setup key-based authentication to Oracle VM Manager 3 CLI "HotCloneVm.sh" script to execute guests hot-backups and proceed to apply retention policies "HotCloneVM.pdf" containing a real user-guide to implement this backup strategy "README_FIRST.txt" containing some tips to configure ssh timeout(s)   Fixes introduced in 0.8a on March, 10th 2017: Fixed an issue on retention policy for VMs containing "_" in the vm-name Fixes introduced in 0.8: Fixed Oracle VM CLI release check  New features available in 0.7a: Compatible with Oracle VM 3.3 / 3.4 Script is now able to identify Oracle VM Manager release and evaluate features enabled or not New options for backup-type available: FULL, SNAP and OVA (OVA available only with 3.4 OVM Release) FULL => HotClone will create a full vdisk backup on a further repository SNAP => HotClone will create an ocfs2 reference-link snapshot of the vm on the same repository OVA  => HotClone will create a packaged OVA file on a further repository Retention is now applied on different backup-types New definition of backup vm name: $guest-OVA for OVA backup types $guest-SNAP for ocfs2-reflink backup types $guest-FULL for full-backup types Retention continues to be applied also on old backups ( $guest-CLONE ) The hot-backup obtained by this script is always a crash-consistent backup of the running vm; if the VM owns also physical-disks, the backup will contain only virtual-disks and so, a manual intervention is needed to have it correctly booting/starting. Here you can find one high-level picture of the target of this script: The idea, here, is to have low-retention backups available on one NFS repository and medium/long retention on a Tape-Library / Further solution (see NDMP); an example could be to have latest 8/15 days (from 8 to 15) on the NFS share and oldest backups on the Tape-Library / NDMP. So the retention can be managed between the two solutions (HotCloneVm script and Tape Library/NDMP) where: HotCloneVm.sh will manage the low-retention on the NFS Repository both Incremental and Full approaches are available with "SNAP" and "FULL" Tape Library / NDMP will manage the long-retention on the Tape Library / NDMP solution both Incremental and Full approaches can be managed by Tape Library / NDMP Having the low-retention on the NFS will allow, moreover, to have a fast restore point for: Single VM file restore or a list of them Just start the VM, that resides on the NFS repository, with a temporary IP address and get files needed. Entire VM restore Stop the original VM and Start a snapshot and/or Clone/Move the FULL backup from the NFS You can also evaluate to start the vm on the NFS repository to be even faster Another option, available only with 3.4 release, is to have backups in OVA format; this option will allow to have backups that can be exported/imported to further Oracle VM Pools; for example you can use OVA exported to have the same VM available on a different Oracle VM Pool (like a clone from Production to Development) or on your laptop/desktop using VirtualBox. First of all you need to setup an ssh-key exchange to obtain a self-authenticated system: [scoter@ovmm: ~/Documents/OVM_34/HotCloneVm_0.7a]# ./SetupSsh.sh ##################################################################################### You have to specify <guest id> or <guest name>: Use SetupSsh.sh <Oracle VM Manager host> <Linux oracle user password> <Oracle VM Manager Password> Example: SetupSsh.sh ovm-mgr.oracle.local oracle Welcome1 ########################################################################################## [scoter@ovmm: ~/Documents/OVM_34/HotCloneVm_0.7a]#  NB: If you have already configured ssh-key exchange vs OVMCli you don't need to execute "SetupSsh.sh" script. To identify syntax to be used, you have only to execute the command without any option: [scoter@myhost: ~/]# ./HotCloneVm.sh #####################################################################################  You have to specify <guest id> or <guest name>:  Use HotCloneVm.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host> <guest name> <Oracle VM Server Pool> <target Repository> <Backup Retention> <backup_type>  <backup_type> options are (no case-sensitive):         - FULL => HotClone will create a full vdisk backup on a further repository         - SNAP => HotClone will create an ocfs2 reference-link snapshot of the vm on the same repository         - OVA  => HotClone will create a packaged OVA file on a further repository - available from 3.4 Example:  HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.local vmdb01 myPool repotarget 8d FULL (retention will be 8 days)  HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.local vmdb01 myPool repotarget d8 SNAP (retention will be 8 days)  HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.local vmdb01 myPool repotarget 8c OVA (retention will be 8 copies)  HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.local vmdb01 myPool repotarget c8 FULL (retention will be 8 copies) ########################################################################################## As usual, your feedback will be really appreciated. 

Updated release of the script is now available at: Hands on Backup Utilities for Oracle VM 3.4 Not more than a couple of hours ago Oracle VM 3.4 has been announced on Virtualization Blog. Here you can...

Oracle

March/April 2016: OTN Virtual Technology Summit

OTN Virtual Technology Summit is coming and we are going to attend this important virtual-class meeting. Hear from Oracle ACEs, Java Champions, and Oracle product experts as they share their insight and experience (through technical demo's/presentations and hands on labs) in meeting today's IT challenges in the upcoming Oracle Technology Network Virtual Technology Summit. These interactive, online events offers four technical tracks, each with a unique focus on specific tools, technologies, and tips. Between them you can find:   Database Track Java Track Middleware Track Operating Systems and Virtualization Track   Following links will help you to schedule and register yourself on sessions:   Registration Form Virtual Technology Summit Agenda and Abstracts   Between the others, under the "Operating Systems and Virtualization Track" you'll find a session dedicated to Oracle VM Templates. On this session we are going to present one of the most requested Hands-on Labs related to Oracle VM Templates: Deploy Oracle Real Application Cluster in minutes using Oracle VM Templates Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) is a cluster database with a shared cache architecture that overcomes the limitations of traditional shared-nothing and shared-disk approaches to provide highly scalable and available database solutions for all your business applications. In this hands-on lab, learn from Oracle experts about how to deploy Oracle RAC in just minutes by leveraging the power of Oracle VM Templates.  On this session you'll see all the steps executed to build up an Oracle VM environment able to host an Oracle RAC deployment; the same steps can also be executed by the attendants following instructions on the video or, if someone prefer, following the tech guide (PDF). At the end of the session, all participants will have the opportunity to make questions or clarify any kind of doubt with the help of Oracle product experts. Hope to virtually meet you over there. Simon       

OTN Virtual Technology Summit is coming and we are going to attend this important virtual-class meeting. Hear from Oracle ACEs, Java Champions, and Oracle product experts as they share their insight...

OOW - Oracle Open World

Oracle VM Hands on Labs: HOL10469, HOL10471 and HOL10472

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 will start in on October 25th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. The idea of these Oracle VM HOL is to enable 40 to 50 customers and partners to meet in a room and install/configure/use Oracle products on laptops during 1 or 2 hours, following detailed documentation and being helped by several Oracle experts. Each student will have a laptop where, thanks to Oracle VM VirtualBox, we will be able to create Oracle VM Demo environments: This year again, my colleague Christophe Pauliat and I will run several Hands On labs about Virtualization. Deploying and Managing a Private Cloud on Oracle VM [HOL10469] In this session, highly experienced Oracle experts walk you through the planning and deployment of a database as a service (DBaaS) private cloud environment with Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c and Oracle VM as the foundation. See how to deploy new Oracle databases or schemas from a catalog in different ways in minutes. Wednesday, Oct 28, 4:15 PM - Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom II (3rd floor) Lab Document Available Here!   Deploy Oracle Real Application Clusters in Minutes using Oracle VM Templates [HOL10471] Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC) is a cluster database with a shared cache architecture that overcomes the limitations of traditional shared-nothing and shared-disk approaches to provide highly scalable and available database solutions for all your business applications. In this hands-on lab, learn from Oracle experts about how to deploy Oracle RAC in just minutes by leveraging the power of Oracle VM Templates. Monday, Oct 26, 11:00 AM - Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom II (3rd floor) Lab Document Available Here!   Deploy an Oracle E-Business Suite System in Minutes using Oracle VM Templates [HOL10472] Oracle E-Business Suite is the most comprehensive suite of integrated, global business applications that enable organizations to make better decisions, reduce costs, and increase performance. And going beyond simple server consolidation, Oracle VM is designed to enable rapid enterprise application deployment. In this hands-on lab, learn how powerful Oracle VM Templates can make rolling out Oracle E-Business Suite quick and easy. Monday, Oct 26, 02:00 PM - Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom II (3rd floor) Lab Document Available Here!   If you will attend Oracle OpenWorld 2015 and are interested by Infrastructure Cloud, OpenStack or Virtualization, add those labs to your calendar using the Schedule Builder tool.  To learn more about other sessions, read the previous blog post - Start Reserving Your Spots in Oracle OpenWorld 2015 Sessions. See you soon @ OOW15!

Oracle OpenWorld 2015 will start in on October 25th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. The idea of these Oracle VM HOL is to enable 40 to 50...

Oracle

VirtualBox 5.0 Enhancements and Features: Disk Image Encryption

On July 9th 2015 we released our new VirtualBox 5.0 major release. This release introduced many new features like: •    Virtual Machine Management     - Paravirtualization support for Windows and Linux guests     - More instruction set extensions available to the guest •     Device support     - xHCI Controller to support USB 3 devices •     Usability     - Improved Drag and drop support     - Disk image encryption     - VMs started with separate GUI – foreground – / VM – background – processes And a further list of GUI enhancements that will be better described in the next articles. The new features that I’m going to introduce today is “Disk Image Encryption”. As you know, the encryption options is something available also on your Host Operating System and for business environments could be a must-to-have; that said, usually, someone could say: “I already have my encryption at a lower level (Host OS), why do I need further encryption for my vms ??” Personally I think that today having encryption on your personal or company laptop could not be enough; the era of CDs/DVDs is going to end (maybe it’s already over) but a new era is coming: •    Local: USB-Keys, USB-disks and, even, mobile devices like our smartphones •    Remote: cloud backup solutions ( free or paid ) Once we are going to copy or move something ( in our example virtual-machines ) on an external local device or on a cloud backup solution often the destination could not be encrypted; so, while your company spent a bunch of $ to have data encryption, your virtual-machines, once copied on external-devices, could have been accessed and used by everyone. Our virtual-machine, created on top of VirtualBox, could contain confidential information, or our next software release, software code or anything else that needs the highest security level. So, this is the target of our new feature “Disk Image Encryption”; thanks to this feature you’ll have encrypted virtual-machines and even if you are going to copy/clone or move them on external-devices / web-storage / cloud-backup their built-in encryption will maintain your data secure. Note: The “Disk Image Encryption” is shipped as a VirtualBox extension pack, which must be installed separately. • Starting with VirtualBox 5.0 ( our latest release today is 5.0.4 ), it is possible to encrypt the data stored in hard disk images transparently for the guest. VirtualBox uses the AES algorithm in XTS mode and supports 128 or 256 bit data encryption keys (DEK): This operation can be executed also using command-line interface, using following syntax: VBoxManage encryptmedium "uuid|filename" --newpassword "file|-" --cipher "cipher id" --newpasswordid "id"   • The DEK is stored encrypted in the medium properties and is decrypted during VM startup by entering a password which was chosen when the image was encrypted:       This operation can be executed also using command-line interface, using following syntax: VBoxManage controlvm "uuid|vmname" addencpassword "id" "password" [--removeonsuspend "yes|no"]   • In some circumstances it might be required to decrypt previously encrypted images and this can be achieved both from GUI and command-line interface:     This operation can be executed also using command-line interface, using following syntax: VBoxManage encryptmedium "uuid|filename" --oldpassword "file|-" Final considerations Since the DEK is stored as part of the VM configuration file, it is important that it is kept safe. Losing the DEK means that the data stored in the disk images is lost irrecoverably. Having complete and up to date backups of all data related to the VM is the responsibility of the user. Here an example of the configuration file of one encrypted virtual-machine:       This is our first chapter of many, about new features introduced by VirtualBox 5.0. See you to the next feature! Let's keep in touch!   Simon COTER  

On July 9th 2015 we released our new VirtualBox 5.0 major release. This release introduced many new features like:•    Virtual Machine Management    - Paravirtualization support for Windows and Linux...

Oracle

Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0 Now Available!!!

Today, with Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0, we completed a big step forward on Desktop Virtualization Solution. Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0, that include a large number of enhancement and bug fixes, is the new real bridge between different Cloud solutions ( Private, Public and Hybrid ) and between Cloud and On-Premise. Here you can find a list of useful documents and links like:     Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0 Official Announcement Oracle Press Release that officially announce Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0   Oracle Virtualization Blog post on VirtualBox 5.0 Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0 post on Official Oracle Virtualization Blog     Virtual Appliances Download for Oracle VM Hands-on Labs Hands-on Labs with Oracle products on top of Oracle VM and VirtualBox     Hands-On Labs for Oracle VM   A list of documents and how-to of Oracle Products installed on a single laptop on top of Oracle VM VirtualBox   Pre-Built Developer VMs (for Oracle VM VirtualBox) A list of pre-built VirtualBox virtual machines with all main Oracle Products on top    Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0 User Manual User Manual with all details, changelog of Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0 Further interesting links for Oracle VM VirtualBox:  Oracle VM VirtualBox Overview page  Oracle VM VirtualBox Community HomePage  Oracle VM VirtualBox Community Forum  Simon COTER

Today, with Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0, we completed a big step forward on Desktop Virtualization Solution. Oracle VM VirtualBox 5.0, that include a large number of enhancement and bug fixes, is the new...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.3.x: guest hot-backup on different repository (v. 0.6d)

PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! Here you can find the new version ( 0.6d ) of the HotCloneVm.sh script ( one new bug-fix introduced, see above ) The requirement was to have an hot guest backup placed on an NFS-reporitory; this NFS repository ( mounted by all Oracle VM servers also on different pools ) is also mounted from a backup-server; on the other hand, an important requirement is the introduction of an automated backup retention policy. The target is to have hot backups of guests on a target NFS repository where backup-server(s) (that could be based on all media library supplied by different Hardware Vendors) store everything on media library (tape and/or further media library) and, at the same time, apply a real retention policy time-based or redundancy-based. So, here you have the script ( that interacts with Oracle VM Manager 3 CLI ) that allows you to schedule hot-snaps and to put them on a dedicated repository (NFS is suggested but you can also evaluate to put them on an OCFS2 repository and export only this "backup" repository outside ). At the following link you can find a zipped file containing:   "SetupSsh.sh" script to setup key-based authentication to Oracle VM Manager 3 CLI "HotCloneVm.sh" script to execute guests hot-backups and proceed to apply retention policies "HotCloneVM_0.6.pdf" containing a real user-guide to implement this backup strategy "README_FIRST.txt" containing some tips to configure ssh timeout(s)   # EDIT May, 11 2015 #  Introduced new release "0.6d" that fixes one problem where CloneCustomizer of "MoveVm phase" is being deleted even if it is in use. # EDIT March, 13 2015 #  Introduced new release "0.6c" that fixes two kind of problems: - cloned backups own vNics. - script is not able to apply backup retention on guest with a "-" in the name At the following link there is the new 0.6d release available Script tested also on latest 3.3.2 release.    Download Here! Corrections, comments and enhancements are welcome.    Simon Coter 

PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! Here you can find the new version ( 0.6d ) of the HotCloneVm.sh script ( one new bug-fix introduced, see above ) The requirement was to have an hot...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.3.1 script: guest hot-backup on different repository (v. 0.4)

  PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! == The target of this script is to schedule hot-backup(s) of running guests == Enhancements( from release 0.1 / 0.2): 1. script is actually able to hot-clone guests that own also physical disks (phy-disks will be excluded in the cloned guest)  2. script is able to hot-clone guests with virtual-disks on different repositories 3. after the moving on the target repository  the cloned-guest is moved under "Unassigned Virtual Machines" 4. improvement on timeout settings on expect scripts and on ssh-connection ( see README_FIRST.txt )         Requirements: - expect installed - Oracle VM >= 3.3.1 release ( it does not work on older Oracle VM releases ) - Oracle VM Manager network reachable - guest owns only virtual-disks ( physical disks cannot be hot-cloned without storage-plugin installed )  - source repository(ies) must be OCFS2 type ( not NFS )  Executing the script:   root@ovmm HotCloneVm_0.4]# pwd /u01/app/oracle/ovm-manager-3/ovm_scripts/HotCloneVm_0.4 [root@ovmm HotCloneVm_0.4]# ./HotCloneVm.sh ##################################################################################### You have to specify <guest id> or <guest name>: Use HotCloneVm.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host> <guest name> <Oracle VM Server Pool> <target Repository> Example: HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.oracle.local vmdb01 myPool repotarget ########################################################################################## [root@ovmm HotCloneVm_0.4]# This little bash script could be executed on a client ( laptop ) or directly on the Oracle VM Manager server. The script, to obtain an hot-clone on different repository, execute the following steps: 1. Identify repository that host each virtual-disk  2. create a dedicated "Clone Customizer" based on the info of the guest and on the virtual-disk placing. 3. create an hot-clone of the guest on the same ocfs2 repository ( using ocfs2-reference-link ); the script is now able to identify physical-disks and exclude them on the cloned-guest.  4. move the hot-clone to the repository ( that could be NFS and/or OCFS2 ) reported in the script 5. move the hot-cloned guest under folder "Unassigned Virtual Machine" NB: It's important to verify the integrity of each hot-cloned guest to verify that the cloned guest is able to complete the boot (mostly if the source-guest owns physical disks ).  In the example below, I'm going to obtain an hot backup of the guest named "testnx01" that resides on "repo01" and move it to a different repo named "nfsrepo02". Source Guest details:  - running - owns both virtual and physical disks - virtual disks are on two different repositories root@ovmm HotCloneVm_0.4]# pwd /u01/app/oracle/ovm-manager-3/ovm_scripts/HotCloneVm_0.4 [root@ovmm HotCloneVm_0.4]# ./HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 127.0.0.1 testlnx01 ovmiscsi.oow.local nfsrepo02 spawn ssh -l admin 127.0.0.1 -p 10000 admin@127.0.0.1's password: ## Starting Generated OVMCLI Script... ##    As you can see in the screenshot below, the script completed the creation of an hot-clone of the guest on the repository "nfsrepo02"; Its name contains the word "CLONE" and, at the same time, contains the data/hour of the execution of the snap; cloned-guest details: - stopped and moved under "Unassigned Virtual Machines" - owns only virtual disks ( the lack of physical-disks must be manually managed at first boot of the guest ) - virtual-disks are both on the target repository      Here you can find the script reported in this blog-post. Corrections, comments and enhancements are welcome.  Simon Coter 

  PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! == The target of this script is to schedule hot-backup(s) of running guests == Enhancements( from release 0.1 / 0.2): 1. script is actually able to...

OOW - Oracle Open World

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 - Oracle VM Hands on Labs: HOL9078, HOL9079, HOL9121 and HOL9122

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 will start in on September 28th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. The idea of these Oracle VM labs is to enable 40 to 50 customers and partners to meet in a room and install/configure/use Oracle products on laptops during 1 or 2 hours, following detailed documentation and being helped by several Oracle experts. The team that, this year, worked on Oracle VM and OpenStack HOL(s) consists of: The labs that we are going to propose this year are the following:   OpenStack: Getting Started with Oracle Linux and Oracle VM [HOL9078] OpenStack is a very flexible system that can be configured, deployed, and used in many ways. This hands-on lab guides users through the setup of an OpenStack deployment with Oracle Linux and Oracle VM. Attendees will learn how to deploy and configure OpenStack with Oracle VM, including launching instances and using networking and storage features. Monday, Sep 29, 1:15 PM - 2:15 PM - Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom I     Building a Complete HA Oracle VM Infrastructure from Server to App [HOL9079] Oracle provides all the components to fulfill all service requirements and support all hypothetical faults and/or needs. Components such as Oracle VM, Oracle Linux, the Ksplice feature of Oracle Linux, and Oracle Clusterware enable you to maintain your systems without service outages and, at the same time, build up a hardware/software fault-tolerant solution. In this hands-on lab, you will learn how to ensure 0 percent service outages with Ksplice for security patching; live migration for server HA, and Oracle Clusterware for uninterrupted application services.  Monday,   Sep 29, 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM -   Hotel Nikko - Mendocino I/II   Here you can download the detailed documentation.    Create Your Own Oracle VM Template to Simplify Your Own Application Deployment [HOL9121] Oracle VM Templates is a key part of the Oracle VM virtualization solution for enabling rapid deployment of enterprise applications. Oracle already provides more than 100 ready-to-use Oracle VM templates for Oracle applications. In this session, you’ll learn how to create your own Oracle VM template for your application. The template will start with Oracle Linux as the guest operating system. Don’t miss this hands-on lab, which shows how you can harness the power of Oracle VM Templates. Wednesday,   Oct 1, 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM -   Hotel Nikko - Nikko Ballroom I   Here you can download the detailed documentation.     Build a private DBaaS Cloud with Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c [HOL9122]   In this session, deeply experienced field engineers walk you through the planning and deployment of a database as a service (DBaaS) private cloud environment with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c and Oracle VM as the foundations. You will see how to deploy new Oracle databases or schemas from a catalog in different ways in minutes. Wednesday, Oct 1, 4:15 PM - 5:15 PM - Hotel Nikko - Mendocino I/II Here you can download the detailed documentation.   If you will attend Oracle OpenWorld 2014 and are interested by Infrastructure Cloud, OpenStack or Virtualization, add those labs to your calendar using the Schedule Builder tool.  See you soon @ OOW14! Simon        Doan Nguyen  - Senior Principal Product Marketing Director for Oracle VM Simon Coter - Technical Expert Core Technology Olivier Canonge  - Pre-Sales Consultant Christophe Pauliat - Systems Sales consultant Bruno Bottreau - Pre-Sales Consultant Ken Crandall - Principal Sales Consultant Ronen Kofman - Director Product Management - Oracle OpenStack  

Oracle OpenWorld 2014 will start in on September 28th. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. The idea of these Oracle VM labs is to enable 40 to...

Oracle

Oracle VM 3.3.1 script: guest hot-backup on different repository (v. 0.2)

PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! Here you can find a further real experience based on real customer case and requirements. The requirement, in this case, was to have an hot guest backup placed on a NFS-repository; this NFS repository ( mounted by all Oracle VM servers also on different pools ) is also mounted by a backup-server. The target, in this case, is to have hot backups of guests on the NFS repository where Backup server ( that could be based on all media library supplied by different Hardware Vendor ) stores everything on media library ( tape and/or further media library ). Obviously, starting from release 3.x, this is possible using the web-interface of Oracle VM Manager but, manual snaps could be a problem if you need to schedule them. So, here you have the script ( that interacts with Oracle VM Manager 3 CLI ) that allows you to schedule hot-snaps and to put them on a dedicated repository ( NFS is suggested but you can also evaluate to put them on an OCFS2 repository and export only this "backup" repository outside ). Requirements: - expect installed - Oracle VM >= 3.3.1 release ( it does not work on older Oracle VM releases ) - Oracle VM Manager network reachable - guest owns only virtual-disks ( physical disks cannot be hot-cloned without storage-plugin installed )  - source repository must be OCFS2 type ( not NFS )  Executing the script:   [scoter@area51: ~/Oracle/OVM_33/HotCloneVm_0.1]# ./HotCloneVm.sh ##################################################################################### You have to specify <guest id> or <guest name>: Use HotCloneVm.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host> <guest name>     <Oracle VM Server Pool> <target Repository> Example <guest name>: HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.oracle.local vmdb01 myPool repo02 #####################################################################################   This little bash script could be executed on a client ( laptop ) or directly on the Oracle VM Manager server. The script, to obtain an hot-clone on different repository, execute the following steps: 1. create an hot-clone of the guest on the same ocfs2 repository ( using ocfs2-reference-link ) 2. create a dedicated "Clone Customizer" based on the info of the guest 3. move the snap to the repository ( that could be NFS and/or OCFS2 ) indicated in the script In the example below, I'm going to obtain an hot backup of the guest named "olnx01" that resides on "repo01" and move it to a different repo named "repo03". Guest details:     [scoter@area51: ~/Oracle/OVM_33/HotCloneVm_0.1]# ./HotCloneVm.sh Welcome1 127.0.0.1 olnx01 ovspool33 repo03 spawn ssh -l admin 127.0.0.1 -p 10000 admin@127.0.0.1's password: ## Starting Generated OVMCLI Script... ## Here you can check jobs executed by the scripts:    As you can see in the screenshot below, the script completed the creation of an hot-clone of the guest on the repository "repo03"; Its name contains the word "CLONE" and, at the same time, contains the data/hour of the execution of the snap:    Here you can find the script reported in this blog-post. Corrections, comments and enhancements are welcome. Simon Coter

PLEASE SEE NEW VERSION RELEASED IN THIS BLOG HERE !!! Here you can find a further real experience based on real customer case and requirements. The requirement, in this case, was to have an hot...

OOW - Oracle Open World

Oracle OpenWorld 2013 hands on labs: HOL9981, HOL9982 and HOL10003

Oracle OpenWorld 2013 will  start in a few days. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. These labs are a unique opportunity to better understand several Oracle products (applications, database, middleware, OS, virtualization, ...). The idea of these labs is to enable 40 to 50 customers and partners to meet in a room and install/configure/use Oracle products on laptops during 1 or 2 hours, following detailed documentation and being helped by several Oracle experts. Once again, thanks to Doan Nguyen (Principal product marketing director for Oracle VM), Olivier Canonge, Christophe Pauliat and I will run labs about Oracle VM for X86 virtualization. This year, we were able to propose 3 labs. See details below. HOL10003: Deploy and Manage a Private Cloud with Oracle VM and Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Date: Monday September 23, 3:15pm - 4:15pm Location: Mariott Marquis Hotel, Room Nob Hill CD Detailed documentation (PDF)     HOL9981: Best Practices for Migrating to Oracle VM and Oracle Linux from VMware and Red Hat Date: Monday September 23, 1:45pm - 2:45pm Location: Mariott Marquis Hotel, Room Nob Hill CD Detailed documentation (PDF)   HOL9982: Oracle Real Application Clusters 12c: Deploying Four Nodes in Minutes with Oracle VM Templates Date: Tuesday September 24, 5:15pm - 6:15pm Location: Mariott Marquis Hotel, Room Nob Hill CD Detailed documentation (PDF)   If you attend Oracle OpenWorld and are interested by Infrastructure Cloud or Virtualization, add those labs to your calendar using the Schedule Builder tool. If you cannot be present, you can still run those labs at office or home using your own X86 machine by following the detailed documents.

Oracle OpenWorld 2013 will  start in a few days. As every year, among the 2000+ sessions presented there will be many Hands on labs. These labs are a unique opportunity to better understand several...

Oracle

Script: Know which dom(0) hold a dom(u)

More than one time we would like to know on which physical server our guest resides without open a new connection to our Oracle VM Manager. So I created a little script that interact with Oracle VM Manager 3 CLI and supply us this information automatically. Requirements: - expect installed - Oracle VM Manager network reachable Executing the script: ########################################################  While executing on Oracle VM Guest:  Use whohost.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host>  Example:            whohost.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.oracle.local ######################################################## #####################################################################################  If executed from a client and want to specify <guest id> or <guest name>:  Use whohost.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host> <guest vmid(uuid)>  Example <guest id>:            whohost.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.oracle.local id=0004fb00000600006e13bfb3507a2f29  Use whohost.sh <Oracle VM Manager password> <Oracle VM Manager host> <guest name>  Example <guest name>:            whohost.sh Welcome1 ovm-mgr.oracle.local name=vmdb01 ##################################################################################### This little bash script could be executed on a client ( laptop ) or directly on a guest; when executed on a linux guest we can evaluate to leave out the guest vmid or guest name ( the script automatically picks up the uuid of the guest ). Execution examples:       From a laptop ( simple client ): [scoter@area51: ~]# ./whohost.sh Welcome1 srvovmm.oracle.local name=srvtestdb01.oracle.local Name = srvtestdb01.oracle.local Id = 0004fb0000060000d84a68991ef40c69 Operating System = Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Server = 00:14:5e:bc:a7:e8:00:14:5e:bc:a7:e8:00:0e:0c:b1 [srvovm04.oracle.local] From an Oracle VM guest ( linux ):  [root@srvlnx01 ~]# ./whohost.sh Welcome1 srvovmm.oracle.local   Name = srvlnx01.oracle.local   Id = 0004fb0000060000a8e1af6d58064b4f   Operating System = Oracle Linux 5   Server = 00:14:5e:bc:a7:e8:00:14:5e:bc:a7:e8:00:0e:0c:b1  [srvovm02.oracle.local] Here you can find the little script. I would like to thank you my colleague Jerome Anten for the collaboration on building up this little but handy script. Corrections, comments and enhancements are welcome. Simon Coter  

More than one time we would like to know on which physical server our guest resides without open a new connection to our Oracle VM Manager. So I created a little script that interact with Oracle VM...

Oracle

Configure Oracle VM Manager Guest Serial Console

Starting from Oracle VM release 3.2.1 a new button apparead on the guest dashboard. This button, named "Launch Serial Console": allows us to open the serial-console of our guest. First time that I tried to use it I saw that I was not able to take advantage of it and I always received the following error:  "The java telnet viewer is not installed on the manager server. Please contact your administrator to install the java telnet viewer on the manager". Into the Oracle VM Manager log ( AdminServer.log ) we can see an error like this one: ####<Sep 10, 2013 4:42:44 PM CEST> <Info> <com.oracle.ovm.ras.servlet.DefaultTtyViewerJnlpServlet> <co701ovc.intranet.fw> <AdminServer> <[ACTIVE] ExecuteThread: '5' for queue: 'weblogic.kernel.Default (self-tuning)'> <<anonymous>> <> <ebeb2dca554134bb:7f4e4f09:13f9f81e2e8:-8000-00000000004d100e> <1378824164483> <BEA-000000> <File /usr/lib/jta/classes/jta26.jar not found on the system or cannot be read >  In this four steps you'll see how to correctly configure java-telnet-viewer on your Oracle VM Manager server: 1) download jta rpm ( java telnet ) from: JTA (Oracle Linux 5): http://public-yum.oracle.com/repo/EnterpriseLinux/EL5/addons/x86_64/jta-2.6-1.noarch.rpm JTA (Oracle Linux 6): http://public-yum.oracle.com/repo/OracleLinux/OL6/addons/x86_64/jta-2.6-1.noarch.rpm  [root@srvovmmgm ~]# rpm -ihv jta-2.6-1.noarch.rpm  Preparing...                ########################################### [100%]    1:jta                    ########################################### [100%] 2) Enable serial-console on your linux guest. NB: In this example will be reported changes done on an Oracle Linux 6 PVM guest machine.  Further details on how-to enable guest serial console are available on MOS official document: Oracle VM: How to Configure 'xm console' Access for Guests (Doc ID 579413.1) This document is related to Oracle VM 2.x version; regarding Oracle VM 3.x you have to modify 3 files on the guest: # /boot/grub/grub.conf # /etc/securetty # /etc/inittab  On Oracle VM 3.x manually modify "vm.cfg" file is not supported. a. Edit grub.conf and append "console=hvc0" on the kernel line that will boot. example: kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.32-358.el6.x86_64 ro root=/dev/mapper/vg_vmdb01-lv_root rd_NO_LUKS rd_LVM_LV=vg_vmdb01/lv_root rd_NO_MD SYSFONT=latarcyrheb-sun16 crashkernel=auto rd_LVM_LV=vg_vmdb01/lv_swap  KEYBOARDTYPE=pc KEYTABLE=us rd_NO_DM LANG=en_US.UTF-8 console=hvc0         b. Edit "/etc/inittab" file and add following line: co:2345:respawn:/sbin/agetty hvc0 9600 vt100-nav c. Edit "/etc/securetty" file and add an entry for hvc0 device: console ... ..... ....... hvc0 3) Reboot your guest by Oracle VM Manager. 4) Connect to Oracle VM Manager console and use the OracleVM Manager guest serial console: Official documentation Oracle VM Server Serial Console for x86 is avaiable at following link: http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E35328_01/E35330/html/vmiug-manager-install.html#idp1400448 Thanks to Avi and Honglin for their valuable support. Comments and corrections are welcome. Simon Coter     

Starting from Oracle VM release 3.2.1 a new button apparead on the guest dashboard. This button, named "Launch Serial Console": allows us to open the serial-console of our guest. First time that I tried...

Oracle

Oracle VM ocfs2 repositories: hot-extend in four easy steps!

Pay Attention: Starting from release 3.1.1 you can extend your repository by refreshing it in Oracle VM Manager.  With release 3.1.1 or above, execute these two simple steps: 1.  refresh LUN containing the repository by "Storage" tab. 2.  refresh your repository Official documentation: What's new in Oracle VM 3.1.1 Usually when our Oracle VM pool needs more disk space we create new repositories and then we proceed to create our new guests or we extend our virtual-disks. Sometimes customers ask us to extend one repository instead of create a new one. I would like to clarify that add one repository is always safer than extend an existing one; this blog post is purely demonstrative that "extend" is possible and it works; remember to take a full repository backup before to extend it. This guide can be used on release 3.0.x. ( starting from release 3.1.1 extend repository by Oracle VM Manager is faster, safer and supported ). In this example we will extend a repository of 250 GB to 300 GB. Here you'll find the four easy steps: 1. Extend the lun on the storage ( .... ) Identify the physical device to extend: [root@ovm01 ~]# df -k /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000                      262144000 235312128  26831872  90% /OVS/Repositories/0004fb0000030000480c7108c43bcaaa    [root@ovm01 scripts]# multipath -ll /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 3600143801259961a0000800001170000 dm-47 HP,HSV360 size=250G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active | `- 2:0:0:29 sdhr 134:16  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:1:29 sdhs 134:32  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:2:29 sdht 134:48  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:3:29 sdhu 134:64  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:1:29 sdhw 134:96  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:0:29 sdhv 134:80  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:2:29 sdhx 134:112 active ready running `-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled   `- 3:0:3:29 sdhy 134:128 active ready running By your storage admin tool ( also by Oracle VM plugin for your storage ) extend your physical device that hosts the repository. 2. Refresh physical size of your storage device  A little code string that can help to prepare the job is: # for i in `multipath -ll /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000| grep sd |sed -e 's:^..............::g' |awk '{print $1}'`; do echo "blockdev --rereadpt /dev/$i" ; done You will get an output similar to that show below: # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhr # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhs  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdht  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhu  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhw  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhv  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhx  # blockdev --rereadpt /dev/sdhy Verify your output and check that the device paths are what you expect; after that execute it on your Oracle VM Server.  Remember to execute this step on all your OracleVM Servers (OVS) that are part of your pool!!! 3. Refresh physical size of your multipath device After refresh of all physical paths ( sd* in this case ) you have to refresh and verify the new size of the multipath-device; to accomplish this step execute the command above: [root@ovm01 scripts]# multipathd -k"resize map 3600143801259961a0000800001170000" ok [root@ovmgv02 scripts]# multipath -ll /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 3600143801259961a0000800001170000 dm-47 HP,HSV360 size=300G features='0' hwhandler='0' wp=rw |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=active | `- 2:0:0:29 sdhr 134:16  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:1:29 sdhs 134:32  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:2:29 sdht 134:48  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 2:0:3:29 sdhu 134:64  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:1:29 sdhw 134:96  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:0:29 sdhv 134:80  active ready running |-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled | `- 3:0:2:29 sdhx 134:112 active ready running `-+- policy='round-robin 0' prio=1 status=enabled   `- 3:0:3:29 sdhy 134:128 active ready running Remember to execute this step on all your OracleVM Servers (OVS) that are part of your pool!!! 4. Verify actual repository size and extend the ocfs2 filesystem  View actual repository size: [root@ovm01 ~]# df -k /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 262144000 235312128  26831872  90% /OVS/Repositories/0004fb0000030000480c7108c43bcaaa   Extend ocfs2 filesystem: comment on "man" of tunefs.ocfs2: option -S, --volume-size Grow the size of the OCFS2 file system. If blocks-count is not specified, tunefs.ocfs2 extends the volume to the current size of the device. So: [root@ovm01 ~]# tunefs.ocfs2 -S /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 NB: just run the command "tunefs.ocfs2" once, on one node part of the ocfs2 cluster. View new repository size:  [root@ovm01 ~]# df -k /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 Filesystem           1K-blocks      Used Available Use% Mounted on /dev/mapper/3600143801259961a0000800001170000 314572800 235315200  79257600  75% /OVS/Repositories/0004fb0000030000480c7108c43bcaaa Refresh repository by OVM-Manager By Oracle VM Manager refresh your repository to acknowledge the new repository size; here an example on Oracle VM Manager 3.2.1: This article is dedicated to the person who keeps me up at night, little Joseph, my son, born January 9, 2013. Comments and corrections are welcome. Simon COTER                     

Pay Attention: Starting from release 3.1.1 you can extend your repository by refreshing it in Oracle VM Manager.  With release 3.1.1 or above, execute these two simple steps: 1.  refresh LUN containing...

Oracle

Workaround for bug 15878716 - Oracle VM Manager HTTPS connections fail with Microsoft Internet Explorer 7, 8, and 9

Please note that this bug is fixed with Oracle VM Manager 3.1.1.544 officialy released on December 10, 2012. If your Oracle VM architecture is based on 3.1.1 release ignore this workaround and proceed patching your environment; you can download the patch here.  The problem could be presented with this simple screenshot: As you can see while connecting to Oracle VM Console with two different browsers achieves different results; Internet Explorer problem is due to a Microsoft fix that update the minimum certificate length ( so the problem is only on https ) to 1024 bits. You can find all the details on this official Microsoft techsite. Here you will find a step-by-step guide on how to modify the certificate of your Oracle VM Manager (Oracle Weblogic) creating a new > 1024 bits self-signed certificate; this workaound could be useful if you have an Oracle VM Manager 3.0.x installation while for OVM 3.1.1 you can install the patch reported above. 1. Generating certificate [root@ovmm ~]# su - oracle [oracle@ovmm ~]$ cd /u01/app/oracle/ovm-manager-3/ [oracle@ovmm ovm-manager-3]$ mkdir certificates [oracle@ovmm ovm-manager-3]$ cd certificates/ [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ export JAVA_HOME=/u01/app/oracle/java [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ export PATH=$JAVA_HOME/bin:$PATH [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ keytool -genkey -alias selfsignedcert -keyalg RSA -keypass privatepassword -keystore identity.jks -storepass password -keysize 2048 -validity 3650 What is your first and last name?   [Unknown]:  ovmm What is the name of your organizational unit?   [Unknown]:  Consulting What is the name of your organization?   [Unknown]:  Oracle What is the name of your City or Locality?   [Unknown]:  Milan   What is the name of your State or Province?   [Unknown]:  Milan What is the two-letter country code for this unit?   [Unknown]:  IT Is CN=ovmm, OU=Consulting, O=Oracle, L=Milan, ST=Milan, C=IT correct?   [no]:  yes 2. Export the certificate from the identity keystore into a file [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ ls -ltr total 8 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle dba 1351 Dec 27 16:01 identity.jks [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ keytool -export -alias selfsignedcert -file root.cer -keystore identity.jks Enter keystore password:   Certificate stored in file <root.cer>   3. Import the certificate you exported into trustovm.jks [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ keytool -import -alias selfsignedcert -trustcacerts -file root.cer -keystore trustovm.jks Enter keystore password:   Re-enter new password:  Owner: CN=ovmm, OU=Consulting, O=Oracle, L=Milan, ST=Milan, C=IT Issuer: CN=ovmm, OU=Consulting, O=Oracle, L=Milan, ST=Milan, C=IT Serial number: 50dce167 Valid from: Thu Dec 27 16:01:43 PST 2012 until: Sun Dec 25 16:01:43 PST 2022 Certificate fingerprints: MD5:  04:46:F3:10:B7:4C:BF:A1:E3:BD:46:03:16:29:12:DE SHA1: 3A:57:7C:D5:6D:F7:F0:4A:CC:59:E0:6C:91:2B:7E:66:F7:18:BC:1A Signature algorithm name: SHA1withRSA Version: 3 Trust this certificate? [no]:  yes Certificate was added to keystore [oracle@ovmm certificates]$ ls -l total 24 -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle dba 1351 Dec 27 16:01 identity.jks -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle dba  575 Dec 27 16:03 root.cer -rw-r--r-- 1 oracle dba  646 Dec 27 16:07 trustovm.jks 4. Take a full cold Oracle VM Manager backup. # service ovmm stop  # stop your Oracle and/or MySql database  # tar cvfz <your_backup_path>/ovmm_backup_full.tgz /u01  5. (if needed) Temporarily enable Oracle VM Manager / Weblogic Console http access ( port 7001 ) and restart Oracle VM Manager. Open Weblogic Server console at this URL: https://<your_weblogic_ip_address>:7002/console Go to Environment => Servers => AdminServer Flag "Listen Port Enabled" for http connection on port 7001, then "Save" and "Activate Changes". after that, restart your ovm-manager service: # service ovmm stop # service ovmm start   6. Add the new certificate by weblogic console. Connect to your Oracle VM Manager Weblogic console: http://<your_ip_address>:7001/console  and login with user "weblogic" and its password.  Go to Environment => Servers => Admin Server Click on the left-size "Lock & Edit" button, Keystores tab => Change => select "Custom Identity and Custom Trust" and then "Save". Fill in the fields with the following information: Custom Identity Keystore: /u01/app/oracle/ovm-manager-3/certificates Custom Identity Keystore Type: jks Custom Identity Keystore Passphrase: password Confirm Custom Identity Keystore Passphrase: password Custom Trust Keystore: /u01/app/oracle/ovm-manager-3/certificates/trustovm.jks Custom Trust Keystore Type: jks Custom Trust Keystore Passphrase: password Confirm Custom Trust Keystore Passphrase: password Save configuration and click on activate changes ( on the left side )   On the SSL Tab, fill in the files with the following information: Private Key Alias: selfsignedcert Private Key Passphrase: privatepassword Confirm Private Key Passphrase: privatepassword Then Click "Save" and "Activate Changes" 7. Restart your Oracle VM Manager and (if needed) close http connection ( port 7001 ) Restart Oracle VM Manager and check that connection to port 7002 is available: # service ovmm stop # service ovmm start Open Weblogic Server console at this URL: https://<your_weblogic_ip_address>:7002/console Go to Environment => Servers => AdminServer Unflag "Listen Port Enabled" for http connection on port 7001, then "Save" and "Activate Changes" ( here we will close http connection ) Restart Oracle VM Manager and check that connection to port 7001 is not available while port 7002 (https) is correctly opened: # service ovmm stop # service ovmm start [root@ovmm ~]# netstat -anp |grep 7001 [root@ovmm ~]# netstat -anp |grep 7002 tcp        0      0 128.0.0.100:7002            0.0.0.0:*                   LISTEN      6258/java            tcp        0      0 127.0.0.1:7002              0.0.0.0:*                   LISTEN      6258/java            tcp        0      0 192.168.56.100:7002         0.0.0.0:*                   LISTEN      6258/java                Now you will be able (by accepting the self-signed certificate) to connect to your Oracle VM Manager on https port, both with Internet Explorer and other browsers: Please Note that this bug is fixed with latest Oracle VM Manager 3.1.1 release ( 544 ) and will be also fixed with the new 3.2.1 release of the product.  Comments and corrections are welcome.  Simon COTER                                 

Please note that this bug is fixed with Oracle VM Manager 3.1.1.544 officialy released on December 10, 2012. If your Oracle VM architecture is based on 3.1.1 release ignore this workaround and proceed...

Oracle

Migrating Virtual Iron guest to Oracle VM 3.x

  As stated on the official site, Oracle in 2009, acquired a provider of server virtualization management software named Virtual Iron; you can find all the acquisition details at this link. Into the FAQ on the official site you can also view that, for the future, Oracle plans to fully integrate Virtual Iron technology into Oracle VM products, and any enhancements will be delivered as a part of the combined solution; this is what is going on with Oracle VM 3.x. So, customers started asking us to migrate Virtual Iron guests to Oracle VM. IMPORTANT: This procedure needs a dedicated OVM-Server with no-guests running on top; be careful while execute this procedure on production environments. In these little steps you will find how-to migrate, as fast as possible, your guests between VI ( Virtual Iron ) and Oracle VM; keep in mind that OracleVM has a built-in P2V utility ( Official Documentation )  that you can use to migrate guests between VI and Oracle VM. Concepts: VI repositories.  On VI we have the same "repository" concept as in Oracle VM; the difference between these two products is that VI use a raw-lun as repository ( instead of using ocfs2 and its capabilities, like ref-links ). The VI "raw-lun" repository, with a pure operating-system perspective, may be presented as in this picture:         Infact on this "raw-lun" VI create an LVM2 volume-group. The VI "raw-lun" repository, with an hypervisor perspective, may be presented as in this picture: So, the relationships are:   LVM2-Volume-Group <-> VI Repository LVM2-Logical-Volume <-> VI guest virtual-disk The first step is to present the VI repository ( raw-lun ) to your dedicated OVM-Server. Prepare dedicated OVM-Server On the OVM-Server ( OVS ) you need to discover new lun and, after that, discover volume-group and logical-volumes containted in VI repository; due to default OVS configuration you need to edit lvm2 configuration file: /etc/lvm/lvm.conf     # By default for OVS we restrict every block device:     # filter = [ "r/.*/" ] and comment the line starting with "filter" as above. Now you have to discover the raw-lun presented and, next, activate volume-group and logical-volumes: #!/bin/bash for HOST in `ls /sys/class/scsi_host`;do echo '- - -' > /sys/class/scsi_host/$HOST/scan; done CPATH=`pwd` cd /dev for DEVICE in `ls sd[a-z] sd?[a-z]`;do echo '1' > /sys/block/$DEVICE/device/rescan; done cd $CPATH cd /dev/mapper for PARTITION in `ls *[a-z] *?[a-z]`;do partprobe /dev/mapper/$PARTITION; done cd $CPATH vgchange -a y After that you will see a new device: [root@ovs01 ~]# cd /dev/6000F4B00000000000210135bef64994 [root@ovs01 6000F4B00000000000210135bef64994]# ls -l 6000F4B0000000000061013* lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 77 Oct 29 10:50 6000F4B00000000000610135c3a0b8cb -> /dev/mapper/6000F4B00000000000210135bef64994-6000F4B00000000000610135c3a0b8cb By your OVM-Manager create a guest server with the same definition as on VI:   same core number as VI source guest same memory as VI source guest same number of disks as VI source guest ( you can create OVS virtual disk with a small size of 1GB because the "clone" will, eventually, extend the size of your new virtual disks ) Summarizing: source-virtual-disk path ( VI ): /dev/mapper/6000F4B00000000000210135bef64994-6000F4B00000000000610135c3a0b8cb   dest-virtual-disk path ( OVS ): /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300006cfeb81c12f12f00/VirtualDisks/0004fb000012000055e0fc4c5c8a35ee.img **   ** = to identify your virtual disk you have verify its name under the "vm.cfg" file of your new guest. Clone VI virtual-disk to OVS virtual-disk dd if=/dev/mapper/6000F4B00000000000210135bef64994-6000F4B00000000000610135c3a0b8cb of=/OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300006cfeb81c12f12f00/VirtualDisks/0004fb000012000055e0fc4c5c8a35ee.img   Clean unsupported parameters and changes on OVS.   1. Restore original /etc/lvm/lvm.conf     # By default for OVS we restrict every block device:     filter = [ "r/.*/" ]     and uncomment the line starting with "filter" as above. 2. Force-stop lvm2-monitor service  # service lvm2-monitor force-stop  3. Restore original /etc/lvm directories ( archive, backup and cache )  # cd /etc/lvm  # rm -fr archive backup cache; mkdir archive backup cache 4. Reboot OVS Refresh OVS repository and start your guest. By OracleVM Manager refresh your repository: By OracleVM Manager start your "migrated" guest:     Comments and corrections are welcome.  Simon COTER                                       

  As stated on the official site, Oracle in 2009, acquired a provider of server virtualization management software named Virtual Iron; you can find all the acquisition details at this link. Into the FAQ...

Oracle

Oracle Certification and virtualization Solutions.

As stated in official MOS ( My Oracle Support ) document 249212.1 support for Oracle products on non-Oracle VM platforms follow exactly the same stance as support for VMware and, so, the only x86 virtualization software solution certified for any Oracle product is "Oracle VM". Based on the fact that:   Oracle VM is totally free ( you have the option to buy Oracle-Support ) Certified is pretty different from supported ( OracleVM is certified, others could be supported ) With Oracle VM you may not require to reproduce your issue(s) on physical server Oracle VM is the only x86 software solution that allows hard-partitioning *** *** see details to these Oracle public links: http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/vm/ovm-hardpart-168217.pdf http://www.oracle.com/us/corporate/pricing/partitioning-070609.pdf people started asking to migrate from third party virtualization software (ex. RH KVM, VMWare) to Oracle VM.   Migrating RH KVM guest to Oracle VM.   OracleVM has a built-in P2V utility ( Official Documentation ) but in some cases we can't use it, due to :   network inaccessibility between hypervisors ( KVM and OVM ) network slowness between hypervisors (KVM and OVM) size of the guest virtual-disks Here you'll find a step-by-step guide to "manually" migrate a guest machine from KVM to OVM. 1. Verify source guest characteristics. Using KVM web console you can verify characteristics of the guest you need to migrate, such as:   CPU Cores details Defined Memory ( RAM ) Name of your guest Guest operating system   Disks details ( number and size ) Network details ( number of NICs and network configuration ) 2. Export your guest in OVF / OVA format.  The export from Redhat KVM ( kernel virtual machine ) will create a structured export of your guest:   [root@ovmserver1 mnt]# ll total 12 drwxrwx--- 5 36 36 4096 Oct 19 2012 b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee is the ID of the guest exported from RH-KVM [root@ovmserver1 mnt]# cd b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee/ [root@ovmserver1 b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee]# ls -ltr total 12 drwxr-x--- 4 36 36 4096 Oct 19  2012 master drwxrwx--- 2 36 36 4096 Oct 29  2012 dom_md drwxrwx--- 4 36 36 4096 Oct 31  2012 images images contains your virtual-disks exported [root@ovmserver1 b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee]# cd images/ [root@ovmserver1 images]# ls -ltra total 16 drwxrwx--- 5 36 36 4096 Oct 19  2012 .. drwxrwx--- 2 36 36 4096 Oct 31  2012 d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5 drwxrwx--- 2 36 36 4096 Oct 31  2012 4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1 drwxrwx--- 4 36 36 4096 Oct 31  2012 . [root@ovmserver1 images]# cd d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5/ [root@ovmserver1 d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5]# ls -l total 5169092 -rwxr----- 1 36 36 187904819200 Oct 31  2012 4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1 -rw-rw---- 1 36 36          341 Oct 31  2012 4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1.meta [root@ovmserver1 d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5]# file 4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1 4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1: LVM2 (Linux Logical Volume Manager) , UUID: sZL1Ttpy0vNqykaPahEo3hK3lGhwspv 4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1 is the first exported disk ( physical volume ) [root@ovmserver1 d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5]# cd ../4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1/ [root@ovmserver1 4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1]# ls -l total 5568076 -rwxr----- 1 36 36 107374182400 Oct 31  2012 9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a -rw-rw---- 1 36 36          341 Oct 31  2012 9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a.meta [root@ovmserver1 4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1]# file 9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a 9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a: x86 boot sector; partition 1: ID=0x83, active, starthead 1,  startsector 63, 401562 sectors; partition 2: ID=0x82, starthead 0, startsector 401625, 65529135 sectors;  startsector 63, 401562 sectors; partition 2: ID=0x82, starthead 0, startsector 401625, 65529135 sectors;  partition 3: ID=0x83, starthead 254, startsector 65930760, 8385930 sectors; partition 4: ID=0x5,  starthead 254, startsector 74316690, 135395820 sectors, code offset 0x48 9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a is the second exported disk, with partition 1 bootable 3. Prepare the new guest on Oracle VM. By Ovm-Manager we can prepare the guest where we will move the exported virtual-disks; under the Tab "Servers and VMs": click on  and create your guest with parameters collected before (point 1):     - add NICs on different networks: - add virtual-disks; in this case we add two disks of 1.0 GB each one; we will extend the virtual disk copying the source KVM virtual-disk ( see next steps )         - verify virtual-disks created ( under Repositories tab ) 4. Verify OVM virtual-disks names. [root@ovmserver1 VirtualMachines]# grep -r hyptest_rdbms * 0004fb0000060000a906b423f44da98e/vm.cfg:OVM_simple_name = 'hyptest_rdbms'   [root@ovmserver1 VirtualMachines]# cd 0004fb0000060000a906b423f44da98e [root@ovmserver1 0004fb0000060000a906b423f44da98e]# more vm.cfg vif = ['mac=00:21:f6:0f:3f:85,bridge=0004fb001089128', 'mac=00:21:f6:0f:3f:8e,bridge=0004fb00101971d'] OVM_simple_name = 'hyptest_rdbms' vnclisten = '127.0.0.1' disk = ['file:/OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/ VirtualDisks/0004fb000012000097c1bfea9834b17d.img,xvda,w', 'file:/OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb0000120000cde6a11c3cb1d0be.img,xvdb,w'] vncunused = '1' uuid = '0004fb00-0006-0000-a906-b423f44da98e' on_reboot = 'restart' cpu_weight = 27500 memory = 32768 cpu_cap = 0 maxvcpus = 8 OVM_high_availability = True maxmem = 32768 vnc = '1' OVM_description = '' on_poweroff = 'destroy' on_crash = 'restart' name = '0004fb0000060000a906b423f44da98e' guest_os_type = 'linux' builder = 'hvm' vcpus = 8 keymap = 'en-us' OVM_os_type = 'Oracle Linux 5' OVM_cpu_compat_group = '' OVM_domain_type = 'xen_hvm' disk2 ovm ==> /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb0000120000cde6a11c3cb1d0be.img     disk1 ovm ==> /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb000012000097c1bfea9834b17d.img         Summarizing disk1 --source ==> /mnt/b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee/images/4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1/9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a disk1 --dest ==> /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb000012000097c1bfea9834b17d.img disk2 --source ==> /mnt/b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee/images/d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5/4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1 disk2 --dest ==> /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb0000120000cde6a11c3cb1d0be.img 5. Copy KVM exported virtual-disks to OVM virtual-disks. Keeping your Oracle VM guest stopped you can copy KVM exported virtual-disks to OVM virtual-disks; what I did is only to locally mount the filesystem containing the exported virtual-disk ( by an usb device ) on my OVS; the copy automatically resize OVM virtual-disks ( previously created with a size of 1GB ) . nohup cp /mnt/b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee/images/4b241ea0-43aa-4f3b-ab7d-2fc633b491a1/9020f2e1-7b8a-4641-8f80-749768cc237a /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb000012000097c1bfea9834b17d.img &   nohup cp /mnt/b8296fca-13c4-4841-a50f-773b5139fcee/images/d4ef928d-6dc6-4743-b20d-568b424728a5/4c03b1cf-67cc-4af0-ad1e-529fd665dac1 /OVS/Repositories/0004fb00000300004f17b7368139eb41/VirtualDisks/ 0004fb0000120000cde6a11c3cb1d0be.img & 7. When copy completed refresh repository to aknowledge the new-disks size. 7. After "refresh repository" is completed, start guest machine by Oracle VM manager.   After the first start of your guest: - verify that you can see all disks and partitions - verify that your guest is network reachable ( MAC Address of your NICs changed ) Eventually you can also evaluate to convert your guest to PVM ( Paravirtualized virtual Machine ) following official Oracle documentation.   Simon COTER ps: next-time I'd like to post an article reporting how to manually migrate Virtual-Iron guests to OracleVM.  Comments and corrections are welcome.               

As stated in official MOS ( My Oracle Support ) document 249212.1support for Oracle products on non-Oracle VM platforms follow exactly the same stance as support for VMware and, so, the only...

Oracle

Integrated Cloud Applications & Platform Services