You're a Manager...Now What?

You shone as an individual contributor.  You completed assignments that were thought impossible.  Your reward?  You were given a team and told "Congratulations.  You're a manager."  Gulp!  Now what do you do?

You refer to this blog for resources that can help you shine as a manager, too!  Plenty of resources exist to help you in your transition to management, but I think the resources below are some really good ones for people new to a management role:

  • www.12manage.com  - when you're in a meeting and someone mentions the Theory of Reasoned Action or a PEST analysis and acts like everyone should know what it is, head to this site.  12manage defines over 2000 management theories across 12 disciplines, including areas like strategy, decision-making, leadership and communications.
  • www.managementhelp.org  - also called the Free Management Library, this site provides overview and in-depth information on over 650 topics managers deal with, including coaching, crisis management, social networking and finances.
  • www.businessballs.com  - started as a "free ethical learning and development resource," the site has over 200 topics across 10 categories, all designed to help you be a better employee ad leader.
  • iTunes University has some great channels and podcasts on improving your management skills.  What Great Bosses Knowincludes titles like " Tips for New Managers," "The Power of Questions," "The Myth of the Open Door" and "Secrets of Great Coaching."  The HBR Idea Cast channel has titles like "Can Introverts Lead?," "What's Holding You Back?" and "Learn from Failure."  Another channel that looks interesting (but I haven't had time to explore) is The Look and Sound of Leadership.
  • www.mindtools.com  - MindTools (TM) provides a variety of resources to help you become exceptionally effective at management and leadership skills.  Although parts of the site are fee-based, the content offered for free is worth checking out.
  • YouTube has a variety of interesting channels to which you can subscribe.  When you subscribe, new videos for that channel are added to your YouTube home page, and you can elect to receive an email for new postings as well.  Harvard Business Review is a great channel, and a list of educational channels can be found here - click the "Most Subscribed" tab to see the most popular education channels.
  • EBSCHost - provides articles from a large database of magazines, journals and other resources, including Fast Company, Harvard Business Review and MIT Sloan Management review.  EBSCO also provides Business Book Summaries - short overviews of current business books.  Oracle employees can access EBSCO here.  Outside of Oracle, you can likely access EBSCO through you public library.

So, how can you actually use this information?  Let's say that you are a new manager, and you have a development conversation with your manager.  Yes, I used the term "development conversation" because those are important, and you should have them if you want to improve you capabilities!  Anyway, you determine that you need to improve your decision-making skills.  Here's what I would recommend:

  • Review "decision-making" at the Free Management Library and at businessballs.com.  Use the information you find there to further define the aspects of decision-making that you need to improve.
  • Take the quiz "How Good is Your Decision-Making?"at MindTools (TM).  Use this information to further refine your goals for improvement and to brainstorm some specific examples of things you might do.
  • Browse YouTube and iTunes to see if there are any videos or podcasts that you can watch about decision-making (put the term in the search box).  As you watch, take notes on things that you might or might not do and determine what you might discuss with your manager or present to your teammates.  Some videos that might be of interest include:
    • The Future of Decision Making - presented by John Rymer, Vice President and Principal Analyst at Forrester, addressing business' need to make smarter, faster decisions to reduce risk and stay profitable.
    • How Companies Can Make Better Decisions - a Harvard Business Review interview with Marcia Blenko, leader of Bain & Company's Global Organization Practice, on integrating effective decision making into your business.
  • Search EBSCOHost to find relevant articles or book summaries on decision-making.  Remember, if your company doesn't subscribe to EBSCHost, you can probably access the database through your public library.
  • From your research, determine one or two things about your decision-making skills that you want to change.  On your development plan, record those things with specific expectations.  Review this with your manager.
  • Check in with yourself, your manager, your direct reports, or your peers on a regular basis to determine if your skills are improving.  You may decide to check in with a few people on a monthly basis, your staff on a quarterly basis, etc.  If you need a tool to track your progress, consider the Stop-Keep-Start concept.  Basically, define your role and area for improvement and then ask what behaviors your should stop, keep and start.  An example might look like this:

Role: Manager

Intended Change: Improve Decision Making Skills

Behaviors to Stop

Behaviors to Keep

Behaviors to Start

· Making decisions without team input

· Make decisions quickly

· Balance pros/cons of decisions

· Gain input from team on product release decisions

If you have others complete a Stop-Keep-Start analysis for you, ask them to be specific in their feedback, and you'll have a great mechanism for deciding specific actions you can take to improve your skills.

  • At your goal point, discuss with your manager your awareness of new decision-making skills, your implementation of those skills, and your next steps for improvement.

Remember, being a manager is different from being an individual contributor - you have more than one person to look out for, and your work in now focused on a bigger picture.  Transitioning into this role is a process, and, as such, it will take both time and effort on your part.  Your best approach is to work with your manager, be open to suggestions for improvement, and remember that you got to this position because you are successful.

If you have additional transition tips or helpful resources, please feel free to leave a comment so that others might learn from your experiences.

Happy managing!

Comments:

Becoming a manager may not mean a promotion necessarily. It shouldn't be the case that managers are viewed as superiors than techies.

Posted by guest on September 12, 2011 at 04:38 PM MDT #

Oh, I absolutely don't mean to imply that managers are superior to those with technical skills - simply that a manager's focus needs to be different than it was as an individual contributor (IC), and that's hard to do sometimes. People are often given a manager role because they're strong ICs, but they're not given any guidance in transitioning into a manager role - they're just expected to do well.

These resources and process can be used to improve skills at both a manager and individual level. My hope is that if you're a manager, you're humble enough to know that you probably have room for improvement, and you're smart enough to put a plan together for that improvement. Hopefully these resources can help.

Posted by Sandy E on September 13, 2011 at 03:54 AM MDT #

I'd be more than a little worried (but not in the least surprised) if Oracle's reward for shining as an individual contributor is to make you a manager. At Sun, the best individual contributors were allowed to rise to the top of the tree as Distinguished Engineers and suchlike, which seems rather more sensible -- why would you want to restrict the amount of time that talented individuals can spend doing what they've proven to be best at?

Posted by guest on September 14, 2011 at 02:33 AM MDT #

This post definitely isn't specific to Oracle! When I was consulting, I worked with many different companies around the world, and quite a few of them moved people into manager roles as a "reward" for being strong individual contributors. From an industry perspective however, I think the trend is moving toward companies providing ways that ICs can move forward in their careers without moving into a management track (like Sun's DE track for technical folks).

Posted by Sandy E on September 14, 2011 at 03:32 AM MDT #

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About

Sandy's ideas about learning, organizational & personal improvement and other stuff.

I work on Oracle's Leadership Development team, but all thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely my own!

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