Coachable Employees Require a Good Coach

Quite a few years ago, I experienced one of those stand-out moments of my life – I sat next to Nadia Comaneci for almost three hours as we flew from Cincinnati to Los Angeles. I competed in, coached, and judged gymnastics, and Nadia’s picture was in my locker all through high school to serve as inspiration for my endless hours in the gym. To say that I was thrilled is a complete understatement.

On a USA gymnastics tour, Nadia had visited the gym I worked at, so I re-introduced myself, and we started talking. She had just talked to Bela (Karolyi) that morning about the upcoming Olympic Trials, so we talked about who we thought would make the team, how gymnastics had changed since we both competed, and all those things that older gymnasts talk about. When I asked about what it took to earn perfect 10s, Nadia simply explained that she did what Bela told her to do. Quite simply, Nadia was coachable.

Interestingly, both Webster and provide a definition for ‘Coach’ but no definition for ‘Coachable.’ I’m going to change that. I would define coachable as having the capacity to receive constructive feedback, trust in what a coach is telling you, and modify performance based upon that feedback. It is mandatory in the sports world, and I believe it is mandatory in the business world as well.

So, how do you build coachable employees? I’m not sure you can. If you look at my definition, ‘coachable’ is a mindset that is actually the responsibility of the individual, not of the coach. However, I think there are four pillars of a coaching relationship that can impact your ability as a coach and your employee’s ability to be coachable. These four pillars are outlined in the table below:

You’ll notice that the first pillar I identified is Infer Positive Intent. I think this is quite possibly the most important pillar. As a coach, I need to trust that my employee really wants to improve, and I need to provide advice that will make him or her a stronger member of the team. If I want to be coachable, I need to believe that my coach has my best interests at heart and will ask me to do things that will have a positive impact on me and my career. Positive Intent forms the basis for trust in the coaching relationship and helps all the other pillars fall into place.

If you’re still reading, it’s obvious that you want to help employees be coachable. But why should they be interested? You might want to fill them in on the benefits of being coachable, including:

  • Increased responsibility. If you prove that you can willingly take advice, learn from others and apply what you are learning, you will build the trust of your manager and likely receive larger assignments with more responsibility. This, in turn, builds your capabilities even further.
  • Accelerated development. Nobody likes to be stagnant. If you willingly accept feedback, you are more likely to receive feedback. The only thing this can do is give you more, broader ideas and increase your potential for professional development.
  • Internal well-being. If you’re coachable, constructive criticism becomes information for change rather than a personal attack. This viewpoint allows you to have a more positive view of yourself and your work.
  • Better relationships. If you are willing to accept and thoughtfully consider feedback, you will be able to build a trusting relationships with your coach and stronger relationships with your team members as they see your willingness to improve.

A willingness to be coached is a critical skill for the success of any individual, and coachable employees contribute to the success of a company. If you want coachable employees, start by modeling coachable behavior yourself, and share with employees why you think being coachable is important. If you’re struggling with where to start, simply ask “Can you tell me more?” the next time you receive feedback and then really listen so that you can better understand that feedback and how you might apply it.

You might not end up on the inside of my locker like Nadia did, but your ability to be coachable or to be a good coach will definitely be admired by others and make it easier for you to succeed at being your best.


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Sandy's ideas about learning, organizational & personal improvement and other stuff.

I work on Oracle's Leadership Development team, but all thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely my own!


« October 2015