45 Ways to Check the Development Plan Box

It's that time of year again...when employees cringe at the thought of creating a development plan, and managers can't wait to check it off the list until next year.  But think about this - I read a blog this week that stated employers have no obligation to be concerned about your development.  You're hired to do a job, and as long as your employer provides the tools and resources to perform that job, they've met their obligation.

Rather than think of the development plan as a box to check off a list, perhaps we should look at the opportunity to create a development plan as a...well, a gift.  If your company is asking you to create a development plan, it's giving you time to think about your career and encouraging your ongoing learning and growth so that you can move your career forward.

I've written two past blogs on ideas for development plans that are not "attend a class" - the last being in 2011 - and I've taken the liberty of updating the list again for 2014 based upon additional inputs, ideas and changes in learning technologies.  Check out the list below and see if there's something in which you might be interested:

  1. Attend a local, regional or national conference. Be sure to bring your findings back to your team. MANAGERS: Make sure you provide the opportunity for your employee to share with the team.
  2. Present at a local, regional or national conference. Ask your manager, peers or mentor about opportunities that exist. Don’t forget about the possibility of presenting at virtual conferences.
  3. Submit ideas to be a guest blogger on a blog that you read and like.
  4. Interview key stakeholders or customers to find out what they like or don't like about your product or service.  Understand their business goals and brainstorm with your team how you can help and how you can build the relationships.
  5. If your company has an internal conference (user groups, engineering conference, etc), apply to present at that.  Actually present if accepted.
  6. Complete a course at your local university or at an online university. Make sure the university is accredited if you’re planning to use your company’s tuition reimbursement program.
  7. If you want to “dip your toes” into virtual learning, Google free online course <insert topic> to see if anything is offered.
  8. Explore Khan Academy to see if there’s an online course that will work for your goals.
  9. Check out iTunes U for a course or podcast that you can listen to while you’re communiting, working out, etc.  You can see a preview of Business topics here.
  10. Finish your undergraduate or Master’s degree.
  11. Write an article for a professional publication or organization.  Be sure to check the submission requirements for the publication!
  12. Join a professional organization and attend a local chapter meeting or seminar. If possible, serve in a leadership position at the local level.
  13. Attend a seminar or workshop offered outside of your company. These are often advertised through professional organizations. Oracle sponsors the Professional Business Womens Conference, and their webinars are free to Oracle employees as advertised in “In the Know.”
  14. Teach a TOI (transfer of information), Lunch & Learn or something similar for your team or another team in your organization.
  15. Create a video on a topic of your expertise and post it to your internal platform (Oracle employees can use OTube upon release).
  16. Review 2-3 journals or magazines every month to monitor industry trends.  You can access many journals through EBSCOHost - commonly available in public libraries with your library card. Oracle employees can access EBSCOHost here).
  17. Read Harvard Business Review or California Management Review to understand business trends.  Both of these can be accessed through EBSCO Host as well.
  18. Pick out a top business book - read it and discuss it with your manager.  This would be a great opportunity to take your manager out for a cup of coffee to get his or her undivided attention.
  19. MANAGERS: Provide a copy of your favorite business book to each member of your team. Use 15 minutes of your staff meeting to discuss a chapter, idea or something else about the book.
  20. Select a technical book to review.  Discuss it with your team, your manager, or your mentor.
  21. Mentor another person.
  22. Ask someone to be your mentor.  Know what you want to get out a mentoring relationship before asking someone.  You may also want to talk with your manager about possible mentors.
  23. Pair up with an Accountability Partner. Different from a mentor, this is a person that you meet with to provide each other with suggestions, feedback and encouragement about your goals and objectives.
  24. Conduct Informational Interviews (about 30 minutes in length) to learn more about different people and lines of business in the company
  25. Volunteer on the board or on a committee of a professional organization.
  26. Google free webinar <insert topic> and see if there's a free webinar that interests you.  Attend and share what you learned with your team.
  27. Start a blog to share your thoughts with others.
  28. Participate in an online community - respond to a blog, start a group on LinkedIn or Facebook, etc.
  29. Join a TwitterChat for a topic area of interest…and participate. You can view the Twitter Chat schedule to see what’s out there. Some topics of interest include Blogging, Business, Career, Communications, Customer Service, Human Resources, Information Technology, Marketing, Social Media, and Technology
  30. For Oracle employees, participate in the Mission Red Innovation Engine.  This is a new tool out of EMEA, designed to turn good ideas into great innovations.
  31. Attend a web-based class offered through your company.
  32. Engage with local colleges to be a guest speaker or host a workshop on campus.
  33. Look for volunteer opportunities with state and local government agencies to provide IT help (if you’re an IT type of person). Many agencies need help in all sorts of areas outside of IT, so if you’re interested, ask if they need help in your area.
  34. Plan a technology fair, science fair or something similar for your company.  Recruit people to present and share ideas.
  35. Join an open source project and get involved in the product development, forums, or aliases.
  36. Lead a group of volunteers for community or charity work to build your leadership skills.
  37. Join the board of a non-profit.  This will give you the ability to assess an entire organization and work on cross-business initiatives, all while doing something good.
  38. If you have a Masters degree, check with a local university or college about becoming an adjunct professor (sometimes called a contract or network instructor).
  39. Volunteer to teach computer skills (or your area of expertise) at a Senior Citizens Center.
  40. Ask your local school districts if they offer any kind of special event around kids and technology.  Volunteer at that event.
  41. Coordinate an internal conference where best practices can be shared for a team within your company - a sales conference for sales people; an IT conference for your technical team, etc.
  42. Volunteer to teach a class at a local Recreation Center or Community Center.
  43. Apply to teach classes for a continuing education program (typically offered through local universities or community colleges). These programs sometimes don’t have the same instructor requirements as becoming an adjunct professor.
  44. Start keeping a reflective journal. Simply record your thoughts about what is happening in your development process and use those reflective thoughts in career conversations with your manager.
  45. Attend a MOOC (massive, open, online courseware).  MOOCs provide access to world-class content on a variety of topics for free.  You just need to have the desire to attend.  Current providers include edX, Coursera and Udacity.

A word of warning about this list: this is just a list. It requires human input to determine how to effectively incorporate one of these ideas into a personal development plan. If one of these options looks intriguing, a manager and employee should work together to determine what, exactly, is expected from the activity and how, exactly, an employee will grow as a result of an activity. Any of the ideas on this list should be used simply as a seed to start a manager/employee discussion.

As you can see, there are many more options for "development" than just attending a class.  If you have other ideas that should be added to this list, please leave a comment in order to share with everyone else.  Hey, then you can add #25 to your plan!

Happy planning!

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About

Sandy's ideas about learning, organizational & personal improvement and other stuff.

I work on Oracle's Leadership Development team, but all thoughts and opinions expressed here are solely my own!

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