Evaluating Models and Prediction Schemes


It has become quite common in RTD implementation to utilize different models to predict the same kind of value in different situations. For example, if the RTD application is used for optimizing the presentation of Creatives, where the creatives belong to a Offers which in turn belong to Campaigns which belong to Products which belong to Product Lines; it may be desirable to be able to predict at the different levels and use the models in a waterfall fashion as they converge and become more precise.

Another example is when using more than one Model or algorithm, whether internal to RTD or external.

In all these cases it is interesting to determine which of the models or algorithms is better at predicting the output. While RTD Decision Center reports provide good Model Quality reports that can be used to evaluate the RTD internal models, the same may not exist for external model. Furthermore, it may be desired to evaluate the different models in a level playing field, utilizing just one metric that can be used to select the "best" algorithm.

One method of achieving this goal is to use an RTD model to perform the evaluation. This pattern is commonly used in Data Mining to "blend" models or create an "ensemble" of models. The idea is to have the predictors as input and the normal positive event as output. When doing this in RTD, the Decision Center Predictiveness report provides the sorting of the different predictors by their predictiveness.

To demonstrate this I have created an Inline Service (ILS) whose sole purpose is to evaluate predictors which represent different levels of noise over a basic "perfect" predictor. The attached image represents the result of this ILS.

The "Perfect" predictor is just a normally distributed variable centered at 3% with a standard deviation of 7%, limited to the range 0 to 1. The output variable follows exactly the probability given by the predictor. For example, if the predictor is 13% there is a 13% probability of the positive output.

The other predictors are defined by taking the perfect predictor and adding a noise component. The noise is also normally distributed and has a standard deviation that determines the amount of noise.

predictiveness.png

 For example, the "Noise 1/5" predictor has noise with a standard deviation of 20% (1/5) of the value of the prefect predictor.

You can see that the RTD blended model nicely discovers that the more noise there is in the predictor, the less predictive it is.

This kind of blended model can also be used to create a combined model that has the potential of being better than each of the individual models. This is particularly interesting when the different models are really different, for example because of the inputs they use or because of the algorithms used to develop the models.

If you want a copy of the ILS send me an email.


Comments:

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

Issues related to Oracle Real-Time Decisions (RTD). Entries include implementation tips, technology descriptions and items of general interest to the RTD community.

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today