Proper Alignment for extra performance

Because of disk parititioning software on your storage clients (keywords : EFI, VTOC, fdisk, DiskPart,...) or a mismatch between storage configuration and application request pattern, you could be suffering a 2-4X performance degradation....

Many I/O performance problem I see end up being the result of a mismatch in request sizes or it's alignment versus the natural block size of the underlying storage. While raw disk storage works using a 512 Byte sector and performs at the same level independent of the starting offset of I/O requests this is not the case for more sophisticated storage which will tend to use larger block units. Some SSDs today support 512B aligned requests but will work much better if you give them 4K aligned requests as described in Aligning on 4K boundaries Flash and Sizes. The Sun Oracle 7000 Unified Storage line supports different sizes of blocks between 4K and 128K (it can actually go lower but I would not recommend that in general). Having proper alignment between the application's view, the initiator partitioning and the backing volume can have great impact on the end performance delivered to applications.

When is alignment most important ?

Alignment problems are most likely to have an impact with
  • running a DB on file shares or block volumes
  • write streaming to block volumes (backups)
Also impacted at a lesser level :
  • large file rewrites on CIFS or NFS shares
In each case adjusting the recordsize to match the workload and insuring that partitions are aligned on a block boundary could have important effect on your performance.

Let's review the different cases.

Case 1: running a Database (DB) on file shares or block volumes

Here the DB is a block oriented application. General ZFS Best Practices warrant that the storage use a record size equal to the DB natural block size. At the logical level, the DB is issuing I/O which are aligned on block boundaries. When using file semantics (NFS or CIFS), then the alignment is guaranteed to be observed all the way to the backend storage. But when using block device semantics, the alignments of requests on the initiator is not guaranteed to be the same as the alignement on the target side. Misalignment of the LUN will cause two pathologies. First, an application block read will straddle 2 storage blocks creating storage IOPS inflation (more backend reads than application reads). But a more drastic effect will be seen for block writes which, when aligned, could be serviced by a single write I/O. Those will now require a Read-Modify-Write (R-W-M) of 2 adjacent storage blocks. Such type of I/O inflation leads to additional storage load and degrade performance during high demand.

To avoid such I/O inflation, insure that the backing store uses a block size (LUN volblocksize or Share recordsize) compatible with the DB block size. If using a file share such as NFS, insure that the filesystem client passes I/O requests directly to the NFS server using a mount option such as directio or use Oracle's dNFS client (Note that with directio mount option, memory management considerations independent of alignment concerns, the server will behave better when the client specifies rsize,wsize options not exceeding 128K). To avoid such LUN misalignment, prefer the use full LUNS as opposed to sliced partition. If disk slices must be used, prefer partitioning scheme in which one can control the sector offset of individual partitions such as EFI labels. In that case start partitions on a sector boundary which aligns with the volume's blocksize. For instance a initial block for a parition which is a multiple of 16 \* 512B sectors will align on an 8K boundary, the default lun blocksize.

Case 2: write streaming to block volumes (backups)

The other important case to pay attention to is stream writing to a raw block device. Block devices by default commit each write to stable storage. This path is often optimized through the use of acceleration devices such as write optimized SSD. Misalignement of the LUNS due to partitioning software imply that application writes, which could otherwise be committed to SSD at low latency, will instead be delayed by disk reads caught in R-M-W. Because the writes are synchronous in nature, the application running on the initiator will thus be considerably delayed by disk reads. Here again one must insure that partitions created on the client system are aligned with the volumes blocksize which typically default to 8K. For pure streaming workloads large blocksize up to the maximum 128K can lead to greater streaming performance. One must take good care that the block size used for a LUNS should not exceed the application writes sizes to raw volumes or risk being hit by the R-M-W penalty.

Case 3: large file rewrites on CIFS or NFS shares

For file shares, large streaming write will be of 2 types : they will either be the more common file creation (write allocation) or they will correspond to streaming overwrite to existing file. The more common write allocation would not greatly suffer from misalignment since there is no pre-existing data to be read and modified. But for the less common streaming rewrite to files, one can definitely be impacted by misalignment and R-M-W cycles. Fortunately file protocols are not subject to LUN misalignment so one must only take care that the write sizes reaching the storage be multiple of the recordsize used to create the file share in the storage. The solaris NFS clients often issues 32K write size for streaming application while CIFS has been observed to use 64K from clients. If existing streaming asynchronous file rewrite is an important component of your I/O workloads (a rare set of conditions), it might well be that setting the LUN blocksize accordingly will provide a boost to delivered performance.

In summary

The problem with alignment is more generally seen with fixed record oriented application (as for Oracle Database or Microsoft Exchange) with random access pattern and synchronous I/O semantics. It can be caused by partitioning software (fdisk, diskpart) which create disk partitions not aligned with the storage blocks. It can also be caused to a lesser extent by streaming file overwrite when the application write size does not match the file share's blocksize. The Sun Storage 7000 line offers great flexibility in selecting different blocksizes for different use within a single pool of storage. However it has no control on the offset that could be selected during disk partitioning of block devices on client systems. Care must be taken when partitioning disks to avoid misalignment and degraded performance. Using full LUNs is preferred.



The views expressed on this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.

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