Tuesday Apr 15, 2008

VNC OpenSolaris/xVM Settings

I use VNC on my system running xVM. Since a lot of other folks are doing the same, I thought I'd share my settings.

First off, I opted for the "VNC Enterprise Edition for UNIX" from RealVNC, which cost $US 50. I like the extra features that this edition (4.3.2) provides... see the web site for more information.

Here's my xstartup file:

#!/bin/sh

xrdb $HOME/.Xresources
xsetroot -solid grey
xterm -geometry 80x24+10+10 -ls -title "$VNCDESKTOP Desktop" &
/usr/local/bin/vncconfig&
gnome-session &

I'm running gnome, so that's why the gnome-session is in there. The vncconfig, however, is the really cool thing. With it, I'm able to copy-n-paste into and out of my vnc window onto my desktop... even if my domU is isolated from my dom0 whilst using IPsec.

When I start vncserver on my domU, I use:

vncserver -geometry 1500x900 -IdleTimeout 0

This stops those blasted disconnections due to idle time. The chosen geometry fits quite comfortably on one of the two 22-inch heads I run at home.

Oh, and I use the vnpasswd on both my dom0 and domU machines and set the passwords to be the same.

Finally, when I start the vnc viewer on my dom0, I use:

vncviewer snvdom1:2 -passwd ~/.vnc/passwd&

With the addition of the -passwd option, I'm able to start the viewer in the background.

Tuesday Nov 27, 2007

Shalon's First Blog Entry

My friend Shalon created his blog today, and his first entry is: A summary about creation of kinds of xen domU.

Shalon is a QE Engineer here in Beijing who is qualifying xVM. He has been instrumental in my efforts to become familiar with xVM, and how we might be able to utilize it in our testing and lab environments.

Wednesday Oct 31, 2007

xen and the art of lab maintenance

I am leading a team looking into how we can make use of xen in our Solaris labs.

I've always been a firm believer of a "Sun on Sun" philosophy. That is, if Sun makes it, and we can use it, we should do so. I've thought this makes sense not only from a quality-control standpoint, but also from a cost perspective.

And, well, with xVM, our implementation of xen, this will definitely be the case.

This technology allows a system to have "guest" operating systems running on it, each with their own memory, disks, and even assigned CPU's. Picture functionality similar to vmware or Parallels... without the cost.

For example, I've got an Ultra 40M2 in my office with 8 Gbytes of memory and two 240 Gbyte SATA disk drives installed. On this setup, I'm running b76 (dom0), with four b76 guest domains (domU's):

zones4

Pretty damn cool!

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