Java SE 6 is Here

Today we formally released “Java Platform Standard Edition 6,” aka Java SE 6.
And although there was more than a little excitement last month about the release of all of Java under the GPLv2 license, this too is big stuff.

Actually it's bigger because it's the proof that developing Java in the open will not only work, but will yield better results than ever before. Java SE 6 is the first version of Java technology to be developed from start to finish as part of a community development process in which Sun released weekly snapshots of the complete source, binaries and documentation for JDK 6. These raw, early access snapshots let external developers review and contribute while the JDK was being developed. More than 330 external developers took part in the process but the code and info was available to everyone. Net-net: We think that makes this the best version of Java ever.

As the precursor to a completely open source community development model, we learned a lot here that will move the GPL program along more quickly—community building, source management, governance—all things that are in the works right now.

But it's the code that counts, and that's now final. And to make this all more valuable and accessible, we revamped NetBeans to support all the new features of Java SE 6. It has better visual tools and better native development capability for building out the next generation of Web applications. Again, we think it's the best IDE for making Java SE 6 developers more productive.

Besides the great work done by the Java community, inside and outside Sun, in getting us to this milestone event, I also want to thank the folks at Microsoft. Yes, that's right—Microsoft. The interoperability teams at Sun and Microsoft worked together to ensure Java SE 6 will work with Windows Vista. As SE6 becomes the standard distro on PCs worldwide this teamwork will ensure the best experience for consumer and enterprise Java users.

So go get it here at: http://java.sun.com/javase/downloads/index.jsp.

Now with that done, it's time to look forward. We're at an inflection point right now—with Java, global communities, bandwidth, Web2.0, time-based media, DRM, and on and on. When we imagine what Java should be going forward, I'd like to hear from you.

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[Trackback] Anwerp is not just about diamonds. JavaPolis 2006 proves it!

Posted by Masood Mortazavi's Blog on December 11, 2006 at 05:49 AM PST #

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