Monday Jun 01, 2015

Voxxed Days Algiers 2015 Trip Report

This is the first in a series of long overdue trip reports now that the unofficial global pre-Summer-vacation conference season is finally winding down after a few hectic months. In terms of both chronology and geography I should start with DevNexus 2015, but I am making a deliberate choice to start with Voxxed Days Algiers instead. It's not often I get to feel I was given an opportunity to make a small difference for folks that deserve much better - Voxxed Days Algiers for me was a genuine honor and privilege affording just such a rare sentiment.

Voxxed Days Algiers was held on May 23 in Algiers, Algeria. This was the inaugural version of this event - indeed it was the first event of it's kind in Algeria, Java centric or otherwise. This is despite the very sizable number of developers of Algerian origin, domestically and worldwide. Besides the Devoxx and Voxxed brand, the event can be credited by and large to the grassroots efforts of the Algeria JUG as well as the neighboring Morocco JUG. Some of the good folks involved include Badr El Houari (Morocco JUG leader), Abderrazak Bouadma (Algeria JUG leader), Meziane Djaout, Yasmine Nasri (Algeria JUG), Yazid Cherif (Algeria JUG), Bessem Hmidi (ESPRIT JUG Tunisia leader) and Mohamed Taman (Egypt JUG leader). Personally I have to especially thank Badr for cordially inviting me to the event and Abderrazak for making the trip a unique unforgettable experience. The event was a humble but profound first step in the right direction for Algerian developers. The event definitely had a strong Java and Java EE showing.

I started the day taking part in the opening keynote featuring the Voxxed Days Algiers team. I aimed to reinforce the significance of the event as well as our team's recognition of it and welcomed attendees to the global Java/EE community. After the keynote I remained in the hall to deliver our current flagship Java EE 8 road map talk.

The talk covers the possibilities for Java EE 8 such as HTTP 2/Servlet 4, Server-Sent Events (SSE), a new standard action-oriented web framework, security simplification, REST management/monitoring, even better JSON support, CDI 2, platform-wide CDI alignment, more pruning, JCache, JMS.next() and Java SE 8 alignment. I also cover Adopt-a-JSR. The slides for the talk are here:

I noted that the detailed speaker notes are available to anyone in the downloadable PowerPoint deck. This means that anyone could deliver the talk if they were so inclined. Concurrent to my talk local Algerian speaker Bilal Khiat delivered a talk covering the Java EE concurrency utilities. Bilal is a Java EE advocate and WebLogic + Oracle Middleware expert.

After lunch I delivered my second talk titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE". The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running. Concurrent to my talk Bilal delivered a talk on building event-driven enterprise applications using JMS and WebSocket.

I finished the conference with my talk on effectively testing Java EE applications using Arquillian. The talk basically goes through each major Java EE API and demonstrates through code how the API could be tested using Arquillian. The slides for the talk is posted below:

The code for the talk is available on GitHub. If you are looking into testing Java EE applications using Arquillian, the code should be very helpful to you. Feel free to give me a holler if you need any help. Concurrent to my talk my good friend Bessem Hmidi talked about his very cool project AngularBeans. AngularBeans is a very useful marriage of AngularJS, CDI and Java EE. In case this intrigues you (and it should) I have a brief recent write-up for the project on The Aquarium. The conference ended on a great note celebrating the 20th anniversary of Java - my second such in-person celebration after Voxxed Days Istanbul (trip report coming soon).

Sadly Algeria remains one of the last great frontiers of global tourism. The country offers food, culture, legendary North African hospitality, a history well soaked with ebbs and flows of tragedy and triumph, not to mention stunning natural beauty. While in Algeria I did not miss the opportunity to take a few days off to explore as much as I could. Thanks to some very kind help from Abderrazak's brother Abdenour I saw pretty much all of Algiers save for the UNESCO World Heritage site Casbah (currently a giant renovation project) as well as the Tipaza Roman ruins (yet another one of Algeria's numerous UNESCO World Heritage sites). I do have pictures to show from my great experience in Algeria (click here if you are having trouble seeing the embedded album):

The generous, unconditional amount of time that Abdenour and Abderrazak spent with me after the conference would frankly put many in my own family to utter shame. If North Africans are the kings of hospitality, Abdenour and Abderrazak are undoubtedly the emperors :-). Thanks to Abdenour there was actually someone around to take a thoughtful picture of me at Tipaza (the steps are from an ancient Roman amphitheater):

Next time I have an opportunity to go to Algeria, I plan to make the trip to see one of the most breathtaking views on planet Earth - Sunrise over the Hoggar mountain chain in the heart of the Algerian Sahara (the Tuareg tribes that make this place their home quite understandably call it "the end of the world"):

All in all, this was one of the most fulfilling trips I've taken in a while, both professionally and personally. I sincerely wish all the best for Voxxed Days Algiers. I hope to see the event grow in the coming years and become a first class destination for the best and the brightest in the Java world...

Monday Feb 16, 2015

CodeMash 2015 Trip Report

CodeMash 2015 took place 6-9 January in Sandusky, Ohio at the exotic Kalahari Waterpark Resort. With another sold-out year, CodeMash is quickly becoming one of the largest developer conferences state-side. It has it's roots in .NET, but is making a concerted effort to better attract a Java audience hence it was important for me to support that effort. This is especially so with Columbus JUG leader Chris Judd leading the Java track and Cleveland JUG leader Scott Seighman speaking. This year it attracted a decent section of the Java crowd. I would say it was better than last year but still has room for much improvement, especially with regards to submissions from Java centric speakers. Topics covered included .NET, methodology, JavaScript/HTML, mobile, cloud, DevOps, Hadoop, NoSQL, Docker, Java SE and Java EE.

I started the first day of the conference with one of my brand new talks this year titled "Reactive Java EE - Let Me Count the Ways!". It aligns Java EE with core Reactive Programming principles. Though many people don't realize it, Java EE has long had very good support for asynchronous, event-driven, non-blocking scalable systems. This includes features and APIs like JMS, Message Driven Beans, Asynchronous Session Beans, CDI events/observers, asynchronous Servlets/NIO, server/client side JAX-RS, WebSocket asynchronous support and the Java EE concurrency utilities. These features can be used in a highly Reactive fashion especially in conjunction with Java SE 8 lambdas, streams and CompletableFuture. The slides for the talk are here:

Thus far this new talk seems to be quite popular and well received. I am sure to present the talk again soon.

In the afternoon I delivered another one of my very popular talks on aligning Java EE 7 with the HTML 5/JavaScript Rich Client landscape. I use AngularJS for my demo but the concepts can apply to any JavaScript (or even native mobile) front-end using a Java EE 7 back-end. This session was a full house with very good feedback afterwards. The slide deck for the talk is posted below:

One of the goals of this talk is actually to give you the starter code for exploring this sort of architecture. The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/javaee-javascript. Do give me a shout if you need help getting the demo up and running but it should be very straightforward.

The second and last day of the conference in the afternoon I delivered our likely new flagship talk for this year titled "What's Coming in Java EE 8". The talk covers the possibilities for Java EE 8 such as HTTP 2/Servlet 4, Server-Sent Events (SSE), a new standard action-oriented web framework, security simplification, REST management/monitoring, even better JSON support, CDI 2, platform-wide CDI alignment, more pruning, JCache, JMS.next() and Java SE 8 alignment. I also cover Adopt-a-JSR. The slides for the talk are here:

Do note that I've now added detailed speaker notes available to you in the downloadable PowerPoint deck. This means that you could deliver the talk yourself if you were so inclined. Since it was towards the end of the conference attendance was sparser but still satisfactory.

All in all, this was a good trip worth doing again. If you are a Java centric speaker, do consider CodeMash as a future destination.

Wednesday Jan 21, 2015

JMaghreb 2014 Trip Report

JMaghreb 2014 was held on November 4-6. Organized by the Morocco JUG, JMaghreb is one of the largest Java developer conferences in North Africa. Although centered around the Maghreb region (that's Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya and Mauritania) the conference is on the radar for folks around the broader Middle East, Africa and Southern Europe. This was yet another brilliant year for the conference. Speakers included Patrick Curran, Werner Keil, Johan Vos, Mohamed Taman, Hazem Saleh, Paul Bakker, Romain Manni-Bucau, Abdelmonaim Remani, Simon Ritter, Angela Caicedo and Mike Milinkovich. Topics included Java SE, Java EE, JavaFX, HTML5/JavaScript, mobile, NoSQL, OSGi, Big Data and the cloud. The passion that organizers including Badr El Houari, Faissal Butaounte, Youssef Misdaq, Mohammed Aboullaite, Abdelmonaim Remani and Mohamed Taman put into JMaghreb speaks for itself. I am extremely grateful that the organizers invited me and very glad that I was able to accept. One of the most remarkable things about JMaghreb that I was astounded to notice was the very large number of female attendees - far more than any conference I have ever gone to. In the words of organizer Faissal Butaounte, "they are sending a clear message - they are passionate about technology".

I started the conference on the first day with my thus far very popular talk on aligning Java EE 7 with the HTML 5/JavaScript Rich Client landscape. I use AngularJS for my demo but the concepts can apply to any JavaScript (or even native mobile) front-end using a Java EE 7 back-end. This session was a full house in the main hall. The slide deck for the talk is posted below:

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/javaee-javascript. Do give me a shout if you need help getting the demo up and running but it should be very straightforward.

I didn't have a talk scheduled the second day so was able to focus on honing my three brand new talks the next day. Romain had a pretty cool talk the second day on TomEE.

I started the last day of the conference with a bang back in the main hall with my talk titled "Why Open Standards and Java/EE Matter (to You)". The talk is actually designed to be a keynote and covers a very important topic that I think there's far too little material out there on. It talks about the core value proposition for standards like Java EE in maintaining a healthy competitive marketplace. It differentiates open technical standards from so called "de-facto standards" and explores the relationship between open source and open standards. I also talk about what the community can do to make standards really work. The talk taps into one of my fields of study that I never pursued in my career and few developers really seem to have even a basic grasp of - economic analysis. This is a talk I've been waiting to give for many years and I am glad I was finally able to start presenting it. To some degree it embodies many of the core motivations that keep me doing what I do to try to help move the Java EE standard forward. The slides for the talk are here:

The talk was very well attended and well received. I was glad to be able to invite Patrick and Mohamed Taman on stage for the talk. I hope to get an opportunity to do this talk again soon (I did the same talk for the closing keynote of Java2Days 2014).

My second talk of the day was our likely new flagship talk for this year titled "What's Coming in Java EE 8". The talk covers the possibilities for Java EE 8 such as HTTP 2/Servlet 4, Server-Sent Events (SSE), a new standard action-oriented web framework, security simplification, REST management/monitoring, even better JSON support, CDI 2, platform-wide CDI alignment, more pruning, JCache, JMS.next() and Java SE 8 alignment. I also cover Adopt-a-JSR. The slides for the talk are here:

The talk had good attendance and I had some excellent conversations afterwards. The Morocco JUG as well as the Egypt JUG are among the early adopters of Java EE 8 JSRs, quite possibly along with the Tunisian JUG community. After lunch Patrick had a session on the JCP which also had very good attendance.

I had the last session slot for the conference and my last talk was very packed. The title of this new talk is "Reactive Java EE - Let Me Count the Ways!". It aligns Java EE with core Reactive Programming principles. Though many people don't realize it, Java EE has long had very good support for asynchronous, event-driven, non-blocking scalable systems. This includes features and APIs like JMS, Message Driven Beans, Asynchronous Session Beans, CDI events/observers, asynchronous Servlets/NIO, server/client side JAX-RS, WebSocket asynchronous support and the Java EE concurrency utilities. These features can be used in a highly Reactive fashion especially in conjunction with Java SE 8 lambdas, streams and CompletableFuture. The slides for the talk are here:

Thus far this new talk seems to be quite popular and well received. I am sure to present the talk again soon.

Besides the conference Morocco was truly a pleasure. It is really a shame more Americans don't make Morocco their preferred travel destination. Morocco features rich history, culture, architecture, food and nature. It is by far one of the most thoroughly friendly countries that I have ever been to with a deep tradition of warm hospitality - and this is despite the obvious signs of poverty and misery. During the conference I was able to explore a little bit of legendary Casablanca, particularly in the evening hours. Thanks to Badr and the JMaghreb organizers I was also able to see a bit of Morocco outside the very urban Casablanca. Our very gracious hosts took some of the speakers including myself for a brief visit to the beautiful desert city of Marrakesh. Though Marrakesh is definitely worth seeing, I found myself truly captivated by the Moroccan country side. To explore it a bit more intimately I excused myself from my hosts and decided to spend some time trekking in the reasonably nearby but far more rugged Agafay desert (popularly known as the "Marrakesh desert"). Agafay is actually at the very base of the Atlas mountain chain and is a very picturesque mix of rocky desert, mountains and classical sand dunes. If you check out the pictures below it's very easy to see why Morocco is one of Hollywood's most favored destinations for science fiction movies. At times, it was easy to imagine that I've magically gone through a dimensional portal into another planet altogether. Only the presence of my local Berber tribesman guide Ali was indication that I was still on planet Earth. Maybe next time I'll skip the companionship just to complete the illusion.

The most awe inspiring experiences that drove home the true hospitality of the Moroccan/Berber people occurred during the hike through a remote mountain village. Since it was lunchtime, Ali and I were actually invited to share a meal with a very friendly rural family! And these were people that barely had the benefit of electricity, running water or mass communication! As time was of essence I and Ali politely declined the once-in-a-lifetime invitation...

The Atlas mountains are very unique on their own right and Agafay barely scratches the surface. The peak of the Atlas Mountains is the second highest in Africa behind mount Kilimanjaro. An overnight strenuous technical climb, it offers some of the most unique terrain in the world and definitely worth attempting if opportunity permits.

All in all I thoroughly enjoyed JMaghreb and Morocco. I hope to return soon and see all the folks I met there again!

Wednesday Nov 12, 2014

NFJS Pacific Northwest Software Symposium Seattle Trip Report

The NFJS Pacific Northwest Software Symposium was held October 17 - 19 in Seattle, Washington. I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. The first one was my JavaScript + Java EE 7 talk titled "Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7". This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory.

My second talk was titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE". The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running.

I finished the day with a talk titled Building Java HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356. The talk introduces HTML 5 WebSocket, overviews JSR 356, tours the API and ends with a small WebSocket demo on GlassFish 4. The slide deck for the talk is posted below.

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/hello-websocket.

On the second day I started with our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

The last talk I delivered was my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD talk. This talk basically overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project.

My next NFJS show is the Great Lakes Software Symposium in Chicago on November 14 - 16. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward (I'll be updating my content on the tour for the next season):

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other useful content on the tour?

Monday Nov 03, 2014

NFJS New England Software Symposium Boston Trip Report

The NFJS New England Software Symposium was held September 19 - 21 in Boston. This is one of the larger NFJS shows and attendance at the show and my sessions was pretty good. It is always encouraging to see the same folks attend more than one talk. On my way to the show I also stopped by at the Connecticut Java User Group (more on that below).

I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. The first one was our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

The second talk I delivered was my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD talk. This talk basically overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project.

I finished off the day with my JavaScript + Java EE 7 talk titled "Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7". This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory.

The first talk on the next day was my session titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE". The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running.

My last one for the show was the talk on JMS 2. Besides covering JMS 2, I've also started to roll in some of the possibilities for JMS 2.1. The slides for the talk are posted below:

Since Boston is such a short drive, I decided to skip the tedious flight for this show. One very nice thing this did was enable me to stop by and speak at the Connecticut Java User Group on the way there. The JUG is led by my friend and co-author for EJB 3 in Action Ryan Cuprak. I've spoken at the JUG a number of times over the years and it was good to be back. I did my JavaScript + Java EE talk there. The attendance was great and I got some great feedback. I hope to speak at the JUG again in the near future as time allows.

My next NFJS show is the Great Lakes Software Symposium in Chicago on November 14 - 16. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward:

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other useful content on the tour?

Wednesday Oct 29, 2014

NFJS Greater Atlanta Software Symposium Trip Report

The NFJS Greater Atlanta Software Symposium was held September 12 - 14. I had four talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. The first one was our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

The second talk I delivered was my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD talk. This talk basically overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project.

On the second day I started with my JavaScript + Java EE 7 talk titled "Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7". This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory.

I finished off the event with a talk titled Building Java HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356. The talk introduces HTML 5 WebSocket, overviews JSR 356, tours the API and ends with a small WebSocket demo on GlassFish 4. The slide deck for the talk is posted below.

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/hello-websocket.

My next NFJS show is the Great Lakes Software Symposium in Chicago on November 14 - 16. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward:

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other useful content on the tour?

Thursday Aug 21, 2014

NFJS Central Iowa Software Symposium Des Moines Trip Report

As some of you may be aware, I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. If you work in the US and still don't know what the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour is, you are doing yourself a very serious disfavor. NFJS is by far the cheapest and most effective way to stay up to date through some world class speakers and talks. Following the US cultural tradition of old-fashioned roadshows, NFJS is basically a set program of speakers and topics offered at major US cities year round.

The NFJS Central Iowa Software Symposium was held August 8 - 10 in Des Moines. The attendance at the event and my sessions was moderate by comparison to some of the other shows. It is one of the few events of it's kind that take place this part the country so it is extremely important. I had five talks total over two days, more or less back-to-back. The first one was my JavaScript + Java EE 7 talk titled "Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7". This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory. I am delivering this material at JavaOne 2014 as a two-hour tutorial. This should give me a little more bandwidth to dig a little deeper, especially on the JavaScript end.

The second talk (on the second day) was our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

The next talk I delivered was my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD talk. This talk basically overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project.

The third was my talk titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE". The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running.

I finishd off the event with a talk titled Building Java HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356. The talk introduces HTML 5 WebSocket, overviews JSR 356, tours the API and ends with a small WebSocket demo on GlassFish 4. The slide deck for the talk is posted below.

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/hello-websocket.

My next NFJS show is the Greater Atlanta Software Symposium on September 12 - 14. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward:

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other useful content on the tour?

Friday Aug 15, 2014

JavaDay Taipei 2014 Trip Report

JavaDay Taipei 2014 was held at the Taipei International Convention Center on August 1st. Organized by Oracle University, it is one of the largest Java developer events in Taiwan. This was another successful year for JavaDay Taipei with a fully sold out venue packed with youthful, energetic developers (this was my second time at the event and I have already been invited to speak again next year!). In addition to Oracle speakers like me, Steve Chin and Naveen Asrani, the event also featured a bevy of local speakers including Taipei Java community leaders. Topics included Java SE, Java EE, JavaFX, cloud and Big Data.

It was my pleasure and privilege to present one of the opening keynotes for the event. I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". I covered the changes in Java EE 7 as well as what's coming in Java EE 8. I demoed the Cargo Tracker Java EE BluePrints. I also briefly talked about Adopt-a-JSR for Java EE 8. The slides for the keynote are below (click here to download and view the actual PDF):

It appears your Web browser is not configured to display PDF files. No worries, just click here to download the PDF file.

In the afternoon I did my JavaScript + Java EE 7 talk titled "Using JavaScript/HTML5 Rich Clients with Java EE 7". This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The talk was completely packed. The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory. I am delivering this material at JavaOne 2014 as a two-hour tutorial. This should give me a little more bandwidth to dig a little deeper, especially on the JavaScript end.

I finished off Java Day Taipei with my talk titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE" (this was the last session of the conference). The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running.

After the event the Oracle University folks hosted a reception in the evening which was very well attended by organizers, speakers and local Java community leaders.

I am extremely saddened by the fact that this otherwise excellent trip was scarred by terrible tragedy.

After the conference I joined a few folks for a hike on the Maokong Mountain on Saturday. The group included friends in the Taiwanese Java community including Ian and Robbie Cheng. Without warning, fatal tragedy struck on a remote part of the trail. Despite best efforts by us, the excellent Taiwanese Emergency Rescue Team and World class Taiwanese physicians we were unable to save our friend Robbie Cheng's life. Robbie was just thirty-four years old and is survived by his younger brother, mother and father. Being the father of a young child myself, I can only imagine the deep sorrow that this senseless loss unleashes. Robbie was a key member of the Taiwanese Java community and a Java Evangelist at Sun at one point.

Ironically the only picture I was able to take of the trail was mere moments before tragedy. I thought I should place him in that picture in profoundly respectful memoriam:

Perhaps there is some solace in the fact that there is something inherently honorable in living a bright life, dying young and meeting one's end on a beautiful remote mountain trail few venture to behold let alone attempt to ascend in a long and tired lifetime. Perhaps I'd even say it's a fate I would not entirely regret facing if it were my own. With that thought in mind it seems appropriate to me to quote some lyrics from the song "Runes to My Memory" by legendary Swedish heavy metal band Amon Amarth idealizing a fallen Viking warrior cut down in his prime:

"Here I lie on wet sand
I will not make it home
I clench my sword in my hand
Say farewell to those I love

When I am dead
Lay me in a mound
Place my weapons by my side
For the journey to Hall up high

When I am dead
Lay me in a mound
Raise a stone for all to see
Runes carved to my memory"

I submit my deepest condolences to Robbie's family and hope my next trip to Taiwan ends in a less somber note.

Wednesday Jul 16, 2014

NFJS UberConf Trip Report

UberConf was held June 24 - June 27 in Denver, Colorado. For those unaware, this is essentially the largest single annual event under the NFJS umbrella and to a certain extent the culminating point of the US based tour. Unlike the usual NFJS events that are squarely locally focused, it's intent is to be a national/international conference. Consequently it has a larger set of attendees, speakers, tracks and sessions. This year's event was very vibrant and clearly a success by all measures.

Personally I was already impressed by the more local events on the tour such as the event in Columbus, Ohio and UberConf certainly did not disappoint. I had a larger number of talks and larger rooms yet still excellent attendance in my talks. As with the other shows I had many folks staying for multiple talks which is always a very good sign. I also got to do a little bit of networking with some Java EE and GlassFish users that I happen to come across. I am hoping I can get some of these folks to jump through the corporate hoops and share their adoption stories at some point.

My first talk for the conference was our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

Next I delivered my talk on JMS 2. Besides covering JMS 2, I've also started to roll in some of the possibilities for JMS 2.1 (as you may be aware the JMS 2.1 specification is beginning to spin up right now). The slides for the talk are posted below:

I started day two delivering my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD material as a three-hour workshop. The workshop overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project. Given the depth of the topic and the current size of the application the three hour slot was actually very effective. My goal was to foster discussion and I thought folks did speak up in the workshop, certainly far more in comparison to the typical session. This bodes very well for my session at JavaOne 2014 covering the material. I and my fellow Cargo Tracker co-committer Vijay Nair will be delivering the tutorial at JavaOne. Below is the slide deck for your review:

Following my workshop, I helped out Arun Gupta with his three hour hands-on-lab on Java EE 7. This is basically the same lab that Arun developed while still at Oracle. It appears the lab has now been evolved to run on both WildFly and GlassFish. The materials for Arun's lab is available on GitHub. The lab really went very well. The attendees provided excellent feedback and the lab was standing room only even given a fairly sizable space.

Following the Java EE 7 lab I delivered my JAX-RS 2 talk. Besides JAX-RS 2, I also talked about the possibilities for JAX-RS 2.1. The slides for the talk are posted below:

My first talk for the final day of the show was my JavaScript+Java EE 7 talk. This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory. I am delivering this material at JavaOne 2014 as a two-hour tutorial. This should give me a little more bandwidth to dig a little deeper, especially on the JavaScript end.

I finished off UberConf with my talk titled "Using NoSQL with ~JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE". The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surprisingly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. The slides for the talk are here:

The JPA based demo is available here, while the CDI based demo is available here. Both demos use MongoDB as the data store. Do let me know if you need help getting the demos up and running.

I did get a chance to have some fun while at UberConf. Pretty close to the conference location was the FlatIrons at Chautauqua Park. A local icon of the Boulder and Denver areas, the FlatIrons offer a very scenic hike with some of the best views of the Rocky Mountains. The hike is not supposed to be particularly strenuous, but it can be for folks like myself not acclimated to the already higher altitudes in the Denver area. Denver is at approximately 5,000 feet above sea level and rightly nicknamed the mile high city. Be very cautious while drinking or undertaking any serious physical strain while in Denver just for a few days - don't underestimate the effects of the thinner air especially if you are not in good health. Patrick Dodson, a long time GlassFish adopter accompanied me for the hike up the FlatIrons and it was definitely worth it. Check out the photos I took below:

My next NFJS show is the NFJS Lone Star Software Symposium in Austin on July 18-20. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward:

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other awesome content on the tour?

Wednesday Jul 09, 2014

NFJS Central Ohio Software Symposium Trip Report

As some of you may be aware, I recently joined the well-respected US based No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour. If you work in the US and still don't know what the No Fluff Just Stuff (NFJS) Tour is, you are doing yourself a very serious disfavor. NFJS is by far the cheapest and most effective way to stay up to date through some world class speakers and talks. Following the US cultural tradition of old-fashioned roadshows, NFJS is basically a set program of speakers and topics offered at major US cities year round. Via NFJS you get to have amazing training without paying for an expensive venue, lodging or travel. The events are usually on the weekends so you don't need to even skip work if you want.

My first engagement with NFJS was the New York Software Symposium on April 4-5. The show went relatively well and I have the trip report here. My second engagement was extremely encouraging - the Central Ohio Software Symposium in Columbus, Ohio on June 6-8. Unlike New York, the Columbus show was fully sold out and very vibrant. I had five talks total over two days, essentially back-to-back. I had a full house for all my sessions and had many of the same folks staying for multiple sessions which is always a very good sign. The close knit nature of NFJS also allows for excellent networking opportunities with Java EE users and occasional Oracle customers. My first talk was our flagship Java EE 7/8 talk. Currently the talk is basically about Java EE 7 but I'm slowly evolving the talk to transform it into a Java EE 8 talk as we move forward. The following is the slide deck for the talk:

The next talk I delivered was my Cargo Tracker/Java EE + DDD talk. This talk basically overviews DDD and describes how DDD maps to Java EE using code examples/demos from the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project.

My third and last one for the first day was the talk on JMS 2. Besides covering JMS 2, I've also started to roll in some of the possibilities for JMS 2.1. The slides for the talk are posted below:

My first talk for day two of the show was my JavaScript+Java EE 7 talk. This talk is basically about aligning EE 7 with the emerging JavaScript ecosystem (specifically AngularJS). The slide deck for the talk is here:

The demo application code is posted on GitHub. The code should be a helpful resource if this development model is something that interests you. Do let me know if you need help with it but the instructions should be fairly self-explanatory.

I finished off the show with a talk on JAX-RS 2. Besides JAX-RS 2, I also talked about the possibilities for JAX-RS 2.1. The slides for the talk are posted below:

After the Columbus show I also spoke at UberConf, the largest yearly "destination" event under the NFJS umbrella held in Denver, Colorado on June 24 - 27. That show went even better than Columbus and I'll write a separate trip report on that soon.

My next NFJS show is the NFJS Lone Star Software Symposium in Austin on July 18-20. Here's my tour schedule so far, I'll keep you up-to-date as the tour goes forward:

I hope you'll take this opportunity to get some updates on Java EE as well as the other awesome content on the tour?

Tuesday Jul 01, 2014

Java Day Tokyo Trip Report

Java Day Tokyo 2014 was held on May 22nd. Organized by Oracle Japan, it is the largest Java developer event in the country. Indeed it is really a replacement to JavaOne Japan. This was another highly successful year for the event with a fully sold out venue packed with youthful, energetic developers. Speakers included Steve Chin, Stuart Marks, Simon Ritter, Nandini Ramani, Cameron Purdy and Yoshio Terada. Topics included Java SE, Java EE and JavaFX.

Cameron Purdy, Vice President of Development at Oracle responsible for Java EE, shared the Java EE 8 road-map during the opening keynote. You can download video of the keynote here.

Following the keynote, I reviewed Java EE 7 and went into more details on Java EE 8 possibilities during my session titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The sizable room was completely packed for the session. At the beginning of the session, I asked the audience whether they wanted to hear more about Java EE 7 or more about Java EE 8. To my pleasant surprise, the audience indicated that they knew about Java EE 7 and wanted to know more about Java EE 8. I talked about possibilities such as HTTP 2/Servlet 4, Server-Sent Events (SSE), a new standard action-oriented web framework, security simplification, multitenancy, REST management/monitoring, CDI 2, platform-wide CDI alignment, more pruning, JCache, configuration, JMS.next() and Java SE 8 alignment. The slides for the talk are here:

I also presented my talk aligning Java EE 7 with the HTML 5/JavaScript Rich Client landscape. I use AngularJS for my demo but the concepts can apply to any JavaScript (or even native mobile) front-end. This session was a full house with standing room only. The slide deck for the talk is posted below:

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/javaee-javascript. Do give me a shout if you need help getting the demo up and running but it should be very straightforward.

Besides my sessions, there were a good number of other Java EE related sessions including from Japanese Java EE evangelist Yoshio Terada (naturally he delivered his talks in Japanese). One of the most interesting of these was a talk titled "Move from J2EE to Java EE" by Hirofumi Iwasaki of Rakuten. For those who don't know what Rakuten is, it is one of the largest e-commerce platforms in the world (by volume) based in Japan. Hirofumi-san made the case for transitioning to Java EE from J2EE and avoiding non-standard frameworks. He blogged about his talk here. His slide deck is embedded below:

He is doing a similar talk at JavaOne 2014 titled "Java EE 6 Adoption in One of the World’s Largest Online Financial Systems".

At the end of the day, we had an "Ask the Experts" panel. I was on the panel along with Steve, Stuart, Simon and David. There was some lively discussion around Java EE, GlassFish and WebLogic that the audience seemed to really appreciate. I too enjoyed the panel.

Fortunately, the trip to Japan wasn't all work and no fun. I was largely expecting to just check out the vibrant Tokyo nightlife, but it turned out I had more free time than I was expecting. As a result, I got to do a whirlwind tour of sights like the Imperial Palace, Senso-ji/Asakusa, Meiji Shrine, Tokyo Skytree, Kabuki-za (I got to check out Kabuki - the legendary Japanese traditional opera), Shinjuku, the insane Tokyo Metro, the dazzling Shibuya Crossing, Tokyo Central Railway Station and a few others. Perhaps next time I'll aim for more of the nightlife such as the Robot Restaurant, Sumo wresting and Japanese heavy metal (yes, there is such a thing). All in all, Japan was a mystifying mix of centuries old traditions and ultramodern fixtures. Just check out the pictures I took below, you'll see what I mean:

I also got to do something I was really looking forward to - check out the Mount Fuji area (some of those pictures are in the album too). Unfortunately, the official climbing season is July though August, denying me the opportunity to ascend one of the most iconic mountains on the planet. Technically I could have attempted it renting the proper gear but it would have probably been a little foolhardy considering I would have been alone and I am not in the kind of shape I once used to be in. Oh well - I guess it's good to have some things to do later in life, perhaps with my wife Nicole once we are at a stage where we can seriously think about doing this sort of thing again (and hopefully can still afford it :-)).

I definitely enjoyed Java Day Tokyo and hope to be part of the event next year again!

Tuesday Mar 11, 2014

Jfokus 2014 Trip Report

Jfokus 2014 took place 3-5 February in Stockholm, Sweden at the Waterfront Congress Centre. This was my first time at the conference. Jfokus slates itself as the largest developer conference in Sweden and it certainly is quite significant in terms of both content quality and attendance. Key organizer Mattias Karlsson deserves a well earned pat on the back for accomplishing such a feat in just a few years. Although the conference is most certainly not limited to Java, luckily for Java developers it does have a slight Java bend. The event attracted a bevy of World class speakers including quite a few of my fellow Oracle colleagues - Mark Reinhold, Georges Saab, Stephen Chin, Simon Ritter, Mark Heckler, Angela Caicedo, Geertjan Wielenga (NetBeans), Heather VanCura (JCP), Cecilia Borg (OpenJDK), Joel Borggrén-Franck (JDK) and Marcus Hirt (JDK). Notable other folks speaking included Venkat Subramaniam, David Blevins, Pratik Patel, Trisha Gee, Martijn Verburg and Anton Arhipov. Topics covered included Java SE, Java EE (of course :-), embedded Java, JavaScript, cloud, mobile, DevOps, agile and Big Data/NoSQL.

The conference started for me on Monday afternoon with a half-day university session titled "Down and Dirty with Java EE 7". This was really a demo-driven introduction to Java EE 7 using Cargo Tracker. Although the real point of Cargo Tracker is demonstrating some sound architectural practices for Java EE as a whole, we have actually wound up organically incorporating quite a bit of Java EE 7. As a result, I was able to use the project to provide an extended session with a mix of lecture and demos covering Java EE 7 at a fairly high level. The rather lengthy session was a full house and seemed to be fairly well received. The slides for the session are here (requires Silverlight - can download the slides even if not available). Ed Burns essentially did the same thing at DevNexus more recently (also using Cargo Tracker).

Tuesday is when the regular sessions started. It was sort of a lighthearted day for me since all I had was a dinner-time shootout between dynamic and static languages hosted by Stephen Chin. I showed up all pumped up with my arguments/counter-arguments ready to launch in favor of Java and static languages (big surprise I was chosen for the static team, right :-)?). As it turned out it was not a serious technical affair at all but just some game show style good matured antics. I had fun on stage and it was all cool. Later that evening I participated in a BoF on the JCP, OpenJDK, Adopt-a-JSR and Java EE 8 with Cecilia Borg, Heather VanCura and Martijn Verburg. I talked about some of the things we are considering on the Java EE 8 survey. The discussion was great and I got some good feedback to return back to the team.

I finished off the conference on Wednesday with my brand new talk titled "HTML5/Rich Clients Using Java EE 7" in the keynote hall. I am very glad Jfokus was keen on this talk since I have been waiting to deliver it for a while now (since then a bunch of other folks have also expressed interest in the talk already). The talk is about the excellent alignment Java EE has with the emerging world of HTML5/JavaScript frameworks like AngularJS, Backbone, Knockout and Ember. Java EE is really quite well positioned to adapt to richer browser clients with APIs like JAX-RS, WebSocket, JSON-P, CDI, EJB3, JPA and Bean Validation. I also briefly talked about Oracle's project Avatar. The talk was a full house and was very well received.

The slides for the talk are below, the demo code is on GitHub. The project should be very easy to setup, but do give me a shout if you need help. My intent is to give you the very basics of what you need to get started exploring this type of architecture.

It was good to catch up with a bunch of folks all at this one event. Check out the pictures below with me, David, Amelia, Tori, Steve, Thomas, Mark and Simon hanging out in the hotel lounge after the conference!

While in Stockholm, a few of us had occasion to check out a few cool spots like old town, the Royal Palace, the Vasa Museum and Skansen (thanks in large part to the pre-conference speakers-only tour organized by Mattias).

The Vasa Museum and Skansen I thought were particularity cool. The Vasa was a massive wooden warship launched in 1628. Legend has it the pride of the Swedish King tragicomicaly sank within minutes of being launched condemning most of the crew to a frigid death due to a number of critical design flaws that rooted back to the King's overgrown ego. The ship was dredged up from the icy waters in the twentieth century, restored and placed into one of Sweden's most visited museums. Skansen has a decidedly less dubious past - reportedly one of the oldest open air museums in the world, it is intended to be a miniature model of Sweden itself in the pre-Industrial era. With aging but well-kept structures moved piece-by-piece from various parts of Sweden and reconstructed in Skansen as well as reenactors in period costume Skansen really feels like going back in a time machine. In US terms, it felt sort of like a very serious and realistic Renaissance Fair (check out the photo album below).

All in all, this was a very good trip. I look forward to going back to Stockholm and Jfokus another year...

About



Reza Rahman is a former independent consultant, now Java EE evangelist.

He is the author of the popular book EJB 3 in Action. Reza is a frequent speaker at Java User Groups and conferences worldwide.

Reza has been a member of the Java EE, EJB and JMS expert groups. He implemented the EJB container for the Resin open source Java EE application server.

All views voiced are my own, not necessarily Oracle's.

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