Monday Nov 11, 2013

Java Developer Days India Trip Report

You are probably aware of Oracle's decision to discontinue the relatively resource intensive regional JavaOnes in favor of more Java Developer Days, virtual events and deeper involvement with independent conferences. In comparison to the regional JavaOnes, Java Developer Days are smaller, shorter (typically one full day), more focused (mostly Oracle speakers/topics) and more local (targeting cities). For those who have been around the Java ecosystem for a few years, they are basically the current incarnation of the highly popular and developer centric Sun Tech Days. October 21st through October 25th I spoke at Java Developer Days India. This was basically three separate but identical events in the cities of Pune (October 21st), Chennai (October 24th) and Bangalore (October 25th). For those with some familiarity with India, other than Hyderabad these cities are India's IT powerhouses.

The events were basically focused on Java EE. I delivered five of the sessions (yes, you read that right), while my friend NetBeans Group Product Manager Ashwin Rao delivered three talks. Jagadish Ramu from the GlassFish team India helped me out in Bangalore by delivering two sessions. It was also a pleasure to introduce my co-contributor to the Cargo Tracker Java EE Blue Prints project Vijay Nair at Bangalore during the opening talk. I thought it was a great dynamic between Ashwin and I flipping between talking about the new features and demoing live code in NetBeans. The following were my sessions (source PDF and abstracts posted as usual on my SlideShare account):

The event went well and was packed in all three cities. The Q&A was great and Indian developers were particularly generous with kind words :-). It seemed the event and our presence was appreciated in the truest sense which I must say is a rarity. The events were exhausting but very rewarding at the same time.

As hectic as the three city trip was I tried to see at least some of the major sights (mostly at night) since this was my very first time to India. I think the slideshow below is a good representation of the riddle wrapped up in an enigma that is India (and the rest of the Indian sub-continent for that matter):

Ironically enough what struck me the most during this trip is the woman pictured below - Shushma. My chauffeur, tour guide and friend for a day, she fluidly navigated the madness that is Mumbai traffic with skills that would make Evel Knievel blush while simultaneously pointing out sights and prompting me to take pictures (Mumbai was my stopover and gateway to/from India). In some ways she is probably the most potent symbol of the new India. I also had occasion to take a pretty cool local bus ride from Chennai to Bangalore instead of yet another boring flight.

All in all I really enjoyed the trip to India and hope to return again soon. Jai Hind :-)!

Tuesday May 28, 2013

JeeConf 2013 Trip Report

JeeConf 2013 was held in historic Kiev on May 24-25. For those of you not familiar with it, JeeConf is the most significant Java conference in the Ukraine. This was a very successful year for this nascent conference with four tracks and capacity attendance. The conference attracted a bevy of local and international speakers including Venkat Subramaniam, Yakov Fain, Talip Ozturk, Jacek Laskowski, Mohamed Taman and Sander Mak. Topics included Java SE, NoSQL, cloud, HTML5/JavaScript, Arquillian and of course Java EE :-).

It was my pleasure and privilege to give the opening talk of the conference. I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk is primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk was received well and I had some pretty good discussions afterwards. It was a full house session which is always encouraging. The slides for the talk are here:

To my delight, the JeeConf folks were very interested in my NoSQL/Java EE talk (titled "Using NoSQL with JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE"). The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surpringly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. This talk was also very well attended and the Q & A was excellent. The slides for the talk are here:

The first demo used MongoDB, EclipseLink NoSQL and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/jpa-nosql-demo. The second demo used MongoDB, CDI, Arquillian and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/cdi-nosql-demo. Give me a shout if you need help getting the demos up and running. I plan to write a two-part blog using the contents of this talk, so stay tuned.

Besides presenting my talks, it was great to catch up with the likes of Venkat, Yakov, Talip, Jacek, Mohamed and Sander. In fact, I spent a few hours playing whirlwind tour guide to Talip whizzing past the usual tourist spots in Kiev including Lavra, St. Michael's Cathedral, Saint Sophia Cathedral, St. Andrew's Church, the House with Chimeras, Andriyivski Uzviz and the Golden Gate. I also got a chance to unwind and rock out with Kievites celebrating City Day to a pretty cool Russian AC/DC cover band named Easy Dizzy at the ever popular Docker's pub. It was an almost surreal experience that probably would have been unimaginable just a few decades ago in the dull age of the Iron Curtain (check out the pictures I took below). It's a great indication of how much Ukraine is changing and has changed already. I also got to experience a more traditional part of Ukrainians as a people with a cold, reserved façade that are in reality kind-hearted, generous hosts who think nothing of deciding to warmly befriend a lone (and probably a bit strange) foreigner for the evening.

I definitely enjoyed JeeConf/Kiev and hope to be part of the conference next year again!

Friday Feb 22, 2013

DevNexus 2013 Trip Report

DevNexus 2013 was held in historic Atlanta on February 18-19. For those of you not familiar with it, DevNexus is the most significant Java conference in the South Eastern US. It was started by JBoss Java Champion Burr Sutter and organized by the Atlanta JUG (currently lead by Vincent Mayers, Gunnar Hillert, et al). As usual DevNexus attracted a bevy of world class speakers including Ben Evans, Neal Ford, David Geary and Venkat Subramaniam. Topics included Java SE, NoSQL, mobile, cloud, HTML5/JavaScript and of course Java EE :-).

On the first day of the conference, I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk is primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk was received well and I had some pretty good discussions during Q & A. It was a completely full house session with standing room only! The slides for the talk are here:

To my delight, the DevNexus folks were very interested in my NoSQL/Java EE talk (titled "Using NoSQL with JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE"). The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surpringly little material on out there. The talk has four parts -- a brief overview of JPA 2.1, a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. This talk was also a full house, the Q & A was excellent and I got great feedback afterwards. The slides for the talk are here:

The first demo used MongoDB, JPA, EclipseLink NoSQL and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/jpa-nosql-demo. The second demo used MongoDB, CDI, Arquillian and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/cdi-nosql-demo. Give me a shout if you need help getting the demos up and running. I plan to write a two-part blog using the contents of this talk, so stay tuned.

Besides giving my talks, I attended a few talks on Java SE, HTML 5/JavaScript and mobile. I definitely enjoyed DevNexus and hope to be part of the conference next year.

About



Reza Rahman is a former independent consultant, now Java EE/GlassFish evangelist.

He is the author of the popular book EJB 3 in Action. Reza is a frequent speaker at Java User Groups and conferences worldwide.

Reza has been a member of the Java EE, EJB and JMS expert groups. He implemented the EJB container for the Resin open source Java EE application server.

All views voiced are my own, not necessarily Oracle's.

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