Friday Jul 19, 2013

Java EE@Chicago JUG

On July 16th, I spoke at the Chicago JUG. Heather VanCura of the JCP helped arrange the talk. I did my Java EE 7 talk (our flagship talk this year) - slides posted below. Now that Java EE 7 is out, I'm trying to do a few more visits to reasonably local JUGs to my home office in Philly (I am speaking in Pittsburgh, Columbus and Cleveland in August).

The talk went very well -- over 75 people attended by my count and the RSVP was even higher than that. I was very happy to share the stage with Simon Maple of ZeroTurnaround (speaking on class loaders/JRebel of course). I gave away a few GlassFish T-shirts, laptop stickers and other goodies. I'm going to try to hit Chicago again when I'm flying cross country.

Tuesday Jun 25, 2013

WebSocket@QCon NY

QCon NY was held on June 10-14 at the New York Marriott/Brooklyn Bridge. Part of the QCon franchise, this is one of the most significant IT conferences in the greater NYC area. It was an honor to do a WebSocket (JSR 356) talk at the conference. Unfortunately, my schedule was such that I could only attend one day of the conference and did not really get a chance to attend many sessions or do much networking. I did get a chance to talk to fellow Oracle speakers Doug Clarke, Stephen Chin and Frederic Desbiens, which was great.

My session, titled Building Java HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356 was very well attended and I had some excellent Q & A. The talk introduces HTML 5 WebSocket, overviews JSR 356, tours the API and ends with a small WebSocket demo on GlassFish 4. The slide deck for the talk is posted below.

The demo code is posted on GitHub: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/hello-websocket.

Oracle hosted a reception in the evening which was very well attended. Later in the evening the QCon organizers hosted a very nice speakers' dinner at a local boutique restaurant with excellent atmosphere and good food.

Monday Jun 24, 2013

JUDCon 2013 Trip Report

JUDCon (JBoss Users and Developers Conference) 2013 was held in historic Boston on June 9-11 at the Hynes Convention Center. JUDCon is the largest get together for the JBoss community, has gone global in recent years but has it's roots in Boston. The JBoss folks graciously accepted a Java EE 7 talk from me and actually referenced my talk in their own sessions. I am proud to say this is my third time speaking at JUDCon/the Red Hat Summit over the years (this was the first time on behalf of Oracle). I had great company with many of the rock stars of the JBoss ecosystem speaking such as Lincoln Baxter, Jay Balunas, Gavin King, Mark Proctor, Andrew Lee Rubinger, Emmanuel Bernard and Pete Muir. Notably missing from JUDCon were Bill Burke, Burr Sutter, Aslak Knutsen and Dan Allen. Topics included Java EE, Forge, Arquillian, AeroGear, OpenShift, WildFly, Errai/GWT, NoSQL, Drools, jBPM, OpenJDK, Apache Camel and JBoss Tools/Eclipse.

My session titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond" went very well and it was a full house. This is our main talk covering the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possibilities for Java EE 8. The slides for the talk are here:

Besides presenting my talk, it was great to catch up with the JBoss gang and attend a few interesting sessions. On Sunday night I went to one of my favorite hangouts in Boston - the exalted Middle East Club as Rolling Stone refers to it (another cool spot in an otherwise pretty boring town is "the Church"). As contradictory as it might sound to the uninitiated, the Middle East Club is possibly the best place in Boston to simultaneously get great Middle Eastern (primarily Lebanese) food and great underground metal. For folks with a bit more exposure, this is probably not contradictory at all given bands like Acrassicauda and documentaries like Heavy Metal in Baghdad.

Luckily for me they were featuring a few local Thrash metal bands from the greater Boston area. It wasn't too bad considering it was primarily amateur twenty-something guys (although I'm not sure I'm a qualified critic any more since I all but stopped playing about at that age). It's great Boston has the Middle East as an incubator to keep the rock, metal, folk, jazz, blues and indie scene alive.

I definitely enjoyed JUDCon/Boston and hope to be part of the conference next year again.

Thursday May 30, 2013

Java EE@NY Java SIG

On May 29th, I spoke at the New York Java Special Interest Group. The NY Java SIG is the first Java User Group in existence (since September 1995) and is the largest Java User Group in North America. It is led by well respected veteran Java Champion Frank Greco. I did my Java EE 7 talk (the same one from JeeConf 2013).

The talk went very well -- the official RSVP shows a sold out event with 275 attendees. I gave away a few GlassFish T-shirts, laptop stickers and Arun Gupta's Java EE 6 pocket guide. More details on the talk here. I most certainly look forward to speaking at the NY Java SIG again.

Tuesday May 28, 2013

JeeConf 2013 Trip Report

JeeConf 2013 was held in historic Kiev on May 24-25. For those of you not familiar with it, JeeConf is the most significant Java conference in the Ukraine. This was a very successful year for this nascent conference with four tracks and capacity attendance. The conference attracted a bevy of local and international speakers including Venkat Subramaniam, Yakov Fain, Talip Ozturk, Jacek Laskowski, Mohamed Taman and Sander Mak. Topics included Java SE, NoSQL, cloud, HTML5/JavaScript, Arquillian and of course Java EE :-).

It was my pleasure and privilege to give the opening talk of the conference. I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk is primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk was received well and I had some pretty good discussions afterwards. It was a full house session which is always encouraging. The slides for the talk are here:

To my delight, the JeeConf folks were very interested in my NoSQL/Java EE talk (titled "Using NoSQL with JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE"). The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surpringly little material on out there. The talk has three parts -- a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA centric facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. This talk was also very well attended and the Q & A was excellent. The slides for the talk are here:

The first demo used MongoDB, EclipseLink NoSQL and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/jpa-nosql-demo. The second demo used MongoDB, CDI, Arquillian and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/cdi-nosql-demo. Give me a shout if you need help getting the demos up and running. I plan to write a two-part blog using the contents of this talk, so stay tuned.

Besides presenting my talks, it was great to catch up with the likes of Venkat, Yakov, Talip, Jacek, Mohamed and Sander. In fact, I spent a few hours playing whirlwind tour guide to Talip whizzing past the usual tourist spots in Kiev including Lavra, St. Michael's Cathedral, Saint Sophia Cathedral, St. Andrew's Church, the House with Chimeras, Andriyivski Uzviz and the Golden Gate. I also got a chance to unwind and rock out with Kievites celebrating City Day to a pretty cool Russian AC/DC cover band named Easy Dizzy at the ever popular Docker's pub. It was an almost surreal experience that probably would have been unimaginable just a few decades ago in the dull age of the Iron Curtain (check out the pictures I took below). It's a great indication of how much Ukraine is changing and has changed already. I also got to experience a more traditional part of Ukrainians as a people with a cold, reserved fa├žade that are in reality kind-hearted, generous hosts who think nothing of deciding to warmly befriend a lone (and probably a bit strange) foreigner for the evening.

I definitely enjoyed JeeConf/Kiev and hope to be part of the conference next year again!

Wednesday Mar 20, 2013

33rd Degree 2013 Trip Report

33rd Degree 2013 was held in historic Warsaw, Poland on March 13-15. For those of you not familiar with it, dubbed "the Conference for Java Masters" this is the premier Java conference for Poland. It attempts to bring together elite speakers in the Java community across the globe. This was my first time at the conference and I most certainly thought the conference lived up to its promise. Just some notable speakers included Tim Berglund, Adam Bien, Ted Neward, Dan North, Simon Ritter, Venkat Subramaniam, Geertjan Wielenga and Kai Wahner.

I delivered three full-house talks, all on the second day of the conference. The first was my talk on Java EE 7 and 8 titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk was primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk had standing room only with 400+ attendees. The slides for the talk are here:

My second talk was on the Java API for WebSocket/JSR 356 titled "Building HTML5/WebSocket Applications with JSR 356 and GlassFish". The talk is based on Danny Coward's JavaOne 2012 talk. The talk covers the basic of WebSocket, the JSR 356 API and a simple demo using Tyrus/GlassFish. The talk went very well and there were some very good questions. This was a full session as well with 150+ attendees. The slides for the talk are here:

The code samples are available here: https://blogs.oracle.com/arungupta/resource/totd183-HelloWebSocket.zip. Give me a shout if you need help getting it up and running.

To my delight, the 33rd Degree folks were very interested in my domain-driven design/Java EE talk (titled "Applied Domain-Driven Design BluePrints for Java EE"). The talk has three parts -- a brief overview of DDD theory, mapping DDD to Java EE and actual running DDD code in Java EE/GlassFish. I converted the well-known DDD sample application (http://dddsample.sourceforge.net/) written mostly in Spring 2 and Hibernate 2 to Java EE 7. My eventual plan is to make the code available via a top level java.net project. Even despite the broad topic and time constraints, the talk went very well. The room was fully packed with 400+ people and I got excellent feedback on the talk later. The slides for the talk are here:

The code examples are available here: https://blogs.oracle.com/reza/resource/cargo-tracker.zip for now, as a simple zip file. Give me a shout if you would like to get it up and running.

Besides presenting my talks, I got to attend some great sessions on Java SE, JavaScript/HTML5, NoSQL and mobile. It was also good to catch up personally with Adam, Kai, Simon and Geertjan.

On a more personal note, I was very curious to explore the heavy metal scene in Poland because I know there have been many brilliant but seriously underrated Polish metal bands like Vader and Behemoth. Luckily for me, bitter cold Winter Friday nights are metal nights in Warsaw. I got to check out some of the city's best young metal bands at the storied Metal Cave.

I definitely enjoyed 33rd Degree 2013 and hope to be part of the conference again next year.

Scandinavian Developer Conference 2013 Trip Report

The Scandinavian Developer Conference (aka ScanDev, aka SDC) 2013 was held in Gothenburg, Sweden on March 4-6. The conference was held at the conference center for Gothia Towers, the largest hotel in Sweden. For those of you not familiar with it, ScanDev is the premier IT conference in the Gothenburg region. It has tracks for product/team management, architecture, UI/UX, testing, data, C/C++, .NET, Java, mobile, JavaScript and PHP. The Java EE presence was particularly strong at the conference. Besides me, Aslak Knutsen and Dan Allen had a talk about Arquillian, David Blevins spoke on TomEE and Kai Wahner had his excellent Java integration frameworks talk. I attended all three talks. I also attended a few talks on Java SE, REST/hypermedia, NoSQL, HTML 5/JavaScript and mobile. It was great to catch up personally with Dan, Aslak and David.

On the first day of the conference, I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk is primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk was well attended. The slides for the talk are here:

On a cool, crisp Saturday morning, I decided to go island hopping across the Southern Gothenburg Archipelago. In the old Norse sagas, these islands were called Elfarsker (the river islets) and today they are a car free paradise (you read that right - there are no cars allowed on the islands). I visited Branno, Styrso and Donso. With picturesque trails and shorelines reminiscence of some of the more desolate parts of the rocky Maine coast, this is a true gem for any outdoors/nature enthusiast. On my 8+ hour hike, I came across perhaps 4-5 people including folks on the ferry to/from the city of Gothenburg proper. Just take a look at some the pictures I took below:

I liked the conference as well as the city of Gothenburg and look forward to going there again.

Friday Feb 22, 2013

DevNexus 2013 Trip Report

DevNexus 2013 was held in historic Atlanta on February 18-19. For those of you not familiar with it, DevNexus is the most significant Java conference in the South Eastern US. It was started by JBoss Java Champion Burr Sutter and organized by the Atlanta JUG (currently lead by Vincent Mayers, Gunnar Hillert, et al). As usual DevNexus attracted a bevy of world class speakers including Ben Evans, Neal Ford, David Geary and Venkat Subramaniam. Topics included Java SE, NoSQL, mobile, cloud, HTML5/JavaScript and of course Java EE :-).

On the first day of the conference, I presented my session on Java EE titled "JavaEE.Next(): Java EE 7, 8, and Beyond". The talk is primarily along the same lines as Arun Gupta's JavaOne 2012 technical keynote. I covered the changes in JMS 2, the Java API for WebSocket (JSR 356), the Java API for JSON Processing (JSON-P), JAX-RS 2, JPA 2.1, JTA 1.2, JSF 2.2, Java Batch, Bean Validation 1.1, Java EE Concurrency and the rest of the APIs in Java EE 7. I also briefly talked about the possible contents of Java EE 8. The talk was received well and I had some pretty good discussions during Q & A. It was a completely full house session with standing room only! The slides for the talk are here:

To my delight, the DevNexus folks were very interested in my NoSQL/Java EE talk (titled "Using NoSQL with JPA, EclipseLink and Java EE"). The talk covers an interesting gap that there is surpringly little material on out there. The talk has four parts -- a brief overview of JPA 2.1, a birds-eye view of the NoSQL landscape, how to use NoSQL via a JPA facade using EclipseLink NoSQL, Hibernate OGM, DataNucleus, Kundera, Easy-Cassandra, etc and how to use NoSQL native APIs in Java EE via CDI. This talk was also a full house, the Q & A was excellent and I got great feedback afterwards. The slides for the talk are here:

The first demo used MongoDB, JPA, EclipseLink NoSQL and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/jpa-nosql-demo. The second demo used MongoDB, CDI, Arquillian and JUnit. The code for it is available on this GitHub repository: https://github.com/m-reza-rahman/cdi-nosql-demo. Give me a shout if you need help getting the demos up and running. I plan to write a two-part blog using the contents of this talk, so stay tuned.

Besides giving my talks, I attended a few talks on Java SE, HTML 5/JavaScript and mobile. I definitely enjoyed DevNexus and hope to be part of the conference next year.

Friday Dec 14, 2012

Java EE 7 Survey Results!

On November 8th, the Java EE EG posted a survey to gather broad community feedback on a number of critical open issues. For reference, you can find the original survey here. We kept the survey open for about three weeks until November 30th. To our delight, over 1100 developers took time out of their busy lives to let their voices be heard!

The results of the survey were sent to the EG on December 12th. The subsequent EG discussion is available here. The exact summary sent to the EG is available here.

We would like to take this opportunity to thank each and every one the individuals who took the survey. It is very appreciated, encouraging and worth it's weight in gold. In particular, I tried to capture just some of the high-quality, intelligent, thoughtful and professional comments in the summary to the EG. I highly encourage you to continue to stay involved, perhaps through the Adopt-a-JSR program. We would also like to sincerely thank java.net, JavaLobby, TSS and InfoQ for helping spread the word about the survey.

Below is a brief summary of the results...

APIs to Add to Java EE 7 Full/Web Profile

The first question asked which of the four new candidate APIs (WebSocket, JSON-P, JBatch and JCache) should be added to the Java EE 7 Full and Web profile respectively.

As the following graph shows, there was significant support for adding all the new APIs to the full profile:

Support is relatively the weakest for Batch 1.0, but still good. A lot of folks saw WebSocket 1.0 as a critical technology with comments such as this one:

  • "A modern web application needs Web Sockets as first class citizens"

While it is clearly seen as being important, a number of commenters expressed dissatisfaction with the lack of a higher-level JSON data binding API as illustrated by this comment:

  • "How come we don't have a Data Binding API for JSON"

JCache was also seen as being very important as expressed with comments like:

  • "JCache should really be that foundational technology on which other specs have no fear to depend on"

The results for the Web Profile is not surprising. While there is strong support for adding WebSocket 1.0 and JSON-P 1.0 to the Web Profile, support for adding JCache 1.0 and Batch 1.0 is relatively weak.

There was actually significant opposition to adding Batch 1. 0 (with 51.8% casting a 'No' vote).

Enabling CDI by Default

The second question asked was whether CDI should be enabled in Java EE environments by default.

A significant majority of 73.3% developers supported enabling CDI, only 13.8% opposed. Comments such as these two reflect a strong general support for CDI as well as a desire for better Java EE alignment with CDI:

  • "CDI makes Java EE quite valuable!"
  • "Would prefer to unify EJB, CDI and JSF lifecycles"

There is, however, a palpable concern around the performance impact of enabling CDI by default as exemplified by this comment:

  • "Java EE projects in most cases use CDI, hence it is sensible to enable CDI by default when creating a Java EE application. However, there are several issues if CDI is enabled by default: scanning can be slow - not all libs use CDI (hence, scanning is not needed)"

Another significant concern appears to be around backwards compatibility and conflict with other JSR 330 implementations like Spring:

  • "I am leaning towards yes, however can easily imagine situations where errors would be caused by automatically activating CDI, especially in cases of backward compatibility where another DI engine (such as Spring and the like) happens to use the same mechanics to inject dependencies and in that case there would be an overlap in injections and probably an uncertain outcome"

Some commenters such as this one attempt to suggest solutions to these potential issues:

  • "If you have Spring in use and use javax.inject.Inject then you might get some unexpected behavior that could be equally confusing. I guess there will be a way to switch CDI off. I'm tempted to say yes but am cautious for this reason"

Consistent Usage of @Inject

The third question was around using CDI/JSR 330 @Inject consistently vs. allowing JSRs to create their own injection annotations.

A slight majority of 53.3% developers supported using @Inject consistently across JSRs. 28.8% said using custom injection annotations is OK, while 18.0% were not sure. The vast majority of commenters were strongly supportive of CDI and general Java EE alignment with CDI as illistrated by these comments:

  • "Dependency Injection should be standard from now on in EE. It should use CDI as that is the DI mechanism in EE and is quite powerful. Having a new JSR specific DI mechanism to deal with just means more reflection, more proxies. JSRs should also be constructed to allow some of their objects Injectable. @Inject @TransactionalCache or @Inject @JMXBean etc...they should define the annotations and stereotypes to make their code less procedural. Dog food it. If there is a shortcoming in CDI for a JSR fix it and we will all be grateful"
  • "We're trying to make this a comprehensive platform, right? Injection should be a fundamental part of the platform; everything else should build on the same common infrastructure. Each-having-their-own is just a recipe for chaos and having to learn the same thing 10 different ways"

Expanding the Use of @Stereotype

The fourth question was about expanding CDI @Stereotype to cover annotations across Java EE beyond just CDI.

A significant majority of 62.3% developers supported expanding the use of @Stereotype, only 13.3% opposed. A majority of commenters supported the idea as well as the theme of general CDI/Java EE alignment as expressed in these examples:

  • "Just like defining new types for (compositions of) existing classes, stereotypes can help make software development easier"
  • "This is especially important if many EJB services are decoupled from the EJB component model and can be applied via individual annotations to Java EE components. @Stateless is a nicely compact annotation. Code will not improve if that will have to be applied in the future as @Transactional, @Pooled, @Secured, @Singlethreaded, @...."

Some, however, expressed concerns around increased complexity such as this commenter:

  • "Could be very convenient, but I'm afraid if it wouldn't make some important class annotations less visible"

Expanding Interceptor Use

The final set of questions was about expanding interceptors further across Java EE...

A very solid 96.3% of developers wanted to expand interceptor use to all Java EE components. 35.7% even wanted to expand interceptors to other Java EE managed classes. Most developers (54.9%) were not sure if there is any place that injection is supported that should not support interceptors. 32.8% thought any place that supports injection should also support interceptors. Only 12.2% were certain that there are places where injection should be supported but not interceptors.

The comments reflected the diversity of opinions, generally supportive of interceptors:

  • "I think interceptors are as fundamental as injection and should be available anywhere in the platform"
  • "The whole usage of interceptors still needs to take hold in Java programming, but it is a powerful technology that needs some time in the Sun. Basically it should become part of Java SE, maybe the next step after lambas?"

A distinct chain of thought separated interceptors from filters and listeners:

  • "I think that the Servlet API already provides a rich set of possibilities to hook yourself into different Servlet container events. I don't find a need to 'pollute' the Servlet model with the Interceptors API"

Wednesday Dec 12, 2012

Java EE@NYC Java Meetup

On November 19th, I spoke at the New York City Java Meetup Group. It's a well-organized group led by my good friends Dario Laverde and Timothy Fagan - I have spoken there numerous times. I did my Java EE 7 talk (the same one from Java2Days 2012).

The talk went very well -- the official RSVP shows 163 attended. I gave away a few GlassFish T-shirts, laptop stickers and Arun Gupta's Java EE 6 pocket guide. More details on the talk here. I most certainly look forward to speaking there again.

Friday Nov 09, 2012

Wanted Now: Your Feedback on Java EE 7!

Work on Java EE 7 presses on under JSR 342. Things are shaping up nicely and Java EE 7 is now in the Early Draft Review stage. You can find out more and get involved by visiting the Java.net project for Java EE.

There are now a number of important open issues that the Java EE expert group would like to get broad community feeback on. These issues include what new JSRs to add to the Java EE Full/Web Profile as well as how to better align CDI with Java EE.

Help shape the future and voice your opinion on these critical open issues by taking the short survey posted here.

About



Reza Rahman is a former independent consultant, now Java EE/GlassFish evangelist.

He is the author of the popular book EJB 3 in Action. Reza is a frequent speaker at Java User Groups and conferences worldwide.

Reza has been a member of the Java EE, EJB and JMS expert groups. He implemented the EJB container for the Resin open source Java EE application server.

All views voiced are my own, not necessarily Oracle's.

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today