Wednesday May 27, 2015

Insights from OIC: LIDS Sports Group Makes Inventory Easy to Access Across Channels

In late March, retail executives gathered at Oracle Industry Connect 2015 to share perspectives. Here is a glimpse of what you missed from the sessions....

Making complete store inventories available to both its online shoppers and associates in physical stores has given Lids Sports Group a 1.5% in-store sales boost and helped e-commerce sales rise “dramatically,” according to Vice President of Information Technology Larry Havlik. He and Lids Director of Applications Development Kevin Thompson revealed the bottom-line and customer service benefits of implementing the Oracle Retail omnichannel order broker solution at Oracle Industry Connect earlier this year.

Prior to going live with the Oracle Retail Order Broker solution (formerly Oracle’s MICROS Locate) in February, online shoppers only saw the caps, apparel, and sports memorabilia currently in stock at Lids’ Indianapolis distribution center, meaning that some items and sizes would display as “unavailable.” However, by adding the on-shelf inventory of 800 of its 1,400 brick-and-mortar stores, Lids immediately moved an additional 72,000 UPCs into the “available for purchase” category.

“Where the inventory is currently located isn’t visible to the online customer, and it doesn’t need to be,” said Havlik. “Locate’s job as an order broker is to accept an order and then look for the best ‘match’ for filling it, whether that’s the DC or another Lids store.”

In addition to expanding offerings to its online shoppers, the Locate deployment has created flexible save-the-sale options in physical stores. Associates can arrange for a requested item to be shipped to a customer’s home or for it to be picked up at another Lids store.

The enhanced availability is particularly beneficial for Lids, which features a large amount of branded team merchandise. Home-town loyalties to different sports teams means stores located in different cities, or even just in different parts of a region, can carry widely varying assortments. “Even stores located only 15 miles apart can have stock differences of as much as 65%,” explained Thompson.

Havlik and Thompson both appreciate the ability to apply Lids-specific business rules to Locate’s order management and fulfillment functions. Settings can be adjusted to decrease available quantities of an item from an individual store to ensure it doesn’t go out of stock, or to increase available quantities if the item is easily available from a DC or other source. For fragile items such as Tiffany lamps, the system can be set up to only fulfill from the DC to ensure products are packaged and shipped so as to avoid breakage.

Other factors used by the system’s decision tree include choosing the fastest/cheapest shipping option; consolidating multi-item orders into as few shipments as possible; and even using different stores’ sell-through and shrink rates as a “tie-breaker.” “Locate could choose to fulfill an item from a store where this item hasn’t been selling well, or it could take into account that a store with a high shrink rate might not be trusted to actually have the inventory on hand,” said Thompson.

Havlik expects even bigger sales increases, both in stores and online, as Lids brings additional stores’ inventory into the system and as “people get more comfortable with saving ‘lost’ sales via Locate.”

Now Available: Augment the Store Experience with Cloud Services

Cloud-based applications essentially outsource many elements of IT management including maintenance and upgrades, leaving time for internal teams to focus on driving business improvements (versus keeping the lights on). Like most industries, the retail industry is increasingly looking to cloud-based solutions when an IT organization can’t carve out time to explore and implement new functionality that the business side seeks due to a lack of resources and competing priorities. Cloud deployments free up IT resources for more strategic projects, and they also allow technology vendors to deliver innovation to retail users more quickly and with more frequent updates. On April 1st, Oracle Retail announced the Cloud Services offerings.  By taking advantage of the flexibility afforded by cloud-based solutions, your team will find it easier to extend and support new technologies to stores located throughout your geographical footprint. 

Call to Action: How will you differentiate your store experience? 

Oracle Retail Xstore with Order Broker will also be available for demonstration at booth #709 during the IRCE conference on June 2-4, 2015 in Chicago. Stop by and see us or contact Oracle Retail to take steps that will impact your bottom line. 

For more insights from OIC, see the remarks by NordstromULTA BeautyOur Executive Team and watch here for more Oracle customer stories. And for another perspective on Lids’ success, click here.

The Oracle Retail team loves the LIDS co-branded shirts. Photo credit: Steve Paradise

Monday Apr 27, 2015

Insights from OIC: Nordstrom’s New Canada Stores Become Testing Grounds for Enterprise IT Initiative

Last month our customer shared some fantastic experiences at Oracle Industry Connect 2015. Here is a glimpse of what you missed from the sessions....

Among its other accomplishments, Nordstrom has been a retailing technology pioneer, beating its competitors to market with customer-focused offerings including save-the-sale and endless aisle capabilities, buy online/pick up in-store, and coordinating returns between multiple stores and channels.

From 2001 until 2013, the Oracle Retail Merchandising System (RMS) served as a technology backbone for Nordstrom’s increasingly complex operations, but this required more and more customization as time progressed. When the retailer realized it was reaching the limits of customization, it initiated the Nordstrom Next Generation (NGEN) initiative, a six-plus-year program to support the company’s growth by replacing its current enterprise foundation solutions with new Oracle Retail systems offering advanced capabilities and scalability.

Nordstrom’s recent expansion into Canada is doubling as the first phase/pilot for NGEN, according to Nordstrom Director of Supply Chain and Fulfillment Brenda Glasgow, who spoke in late March at Oracle Industry Connect in Washington DC. The retailer has already opened two of a planned 10 full-line stores in Canada, with the next opening planned for fall 2015, and also plans to open its off-price Nordstrom Rack stores beginning in 2017.

The Canada expansion “gives us a chance to test, learn, and adjust with our business partners and technologists,” said Glasgow. “It’s allowing us to socialize the ‘vanilla’ implementations of Oracle solutions, and giving us practice managing the scope of these implementations.”

Nordstrom is still relying heavily on Oracle solutions, particularly in merchandising with Oracle Retail Merchandise Operations Management (MOM). This system is supporting international requirements around currencies and import/export issues, and Nordstrom is also taking advantage of new trade management and invoice matching modules that supplant older legacy applications for these functions.

Glasgow and Deby Hansen, Director of Program Management and Architecture for Nordstrom, identified key learnings from the Canada opportunity that include leveraging best practices identified in the Oracle Retail Reference Library, and using a process-led design approach that makes extensive use of personas and job roles. “By painting a full picture of a job’s process flow, it’s been easier to work through what’s been different from one system to the next,” said Glasgow. “We need to balance respecting our people’s business requirements with our motivation to stay ‘vanilla’ with these implementations.”

Nordstrom will apply these learnings as NGEN progresses, supporting long-term corporate goals that include sustaining the company’s growth, supporting its Nordstrom Rack stores becoming more of a separate entity, and “keeping us on an upgrade path that leverages our research and development investments,” said Hansen.

Congratulations to Nordstrom for their hard work and success. Nordstrom continues to impress the industry with their approach to the enterprise transformation. Read the press release or check out the presentation in the RACK to dive a little deeper. 

Friday Oct 26, 2012

Analytics in an Omni-Channel World

Retail has been around ever since mankind started bartering.  The earliest transactions were very specific to the individuals buying and selling, then someone had the bright idea to open a store.  Those transactions were a little more generic, but the store owner still knew his customers and what they wanted.  As the chains rolled out, customer intimacy was sacrificed for scale, and retailers began to rely on segments and clusters.  But thanks to the widespread availability of data and the technology to convert said data into information, retailers are getting back to details.

The retail industry is following a maturity model for analytics that is has progressed through five stages, each delivering more value than the previous.

Store Analytics

Brick-and-mortar retailers (and pure-play catalogers as well) that collect anonymous basket-level data are able to get some sense of demand to help with allocation decisions.  Promotions and foot-traffic can be measured to understand marketing effectiveness and perhaps focus groups can help test ideas.  But decisions are influenced by the majority, using faceless customer segments and aggregated industry data points.  Loyalty programs help a little, but in many cases the cost outweighs the benefits.

Web Analytics

The Web made it much easier to collect data on specific, yet still anonymous consumers using cookies to track visits. Clickstreams and product searches are analyzed to understand the purchase journey, gauge demand, and better understand up-selling opportunities.  Personalization begins to allow retailers target market consumers with recommendations.

Cross-Channel Analytics

This phase is a minor one, but where most retailers probably sit today.  They are able to use information from one channel to bolster activities in another. However, there are technical challenges combining data silos so its not an easy task.  But for those retailers that are able to perform analytics on both sources of data, the pay-off is pretty nice.  Revenue per customer begins to go up as customers have a better brand experience.

Mobile & Social Analytics

Big data technologies are enabling a 360-degree view of the customer by incorporating psychographic data from social sites alongside traditional demographic data.  Retailers can track individual preferences, opinions, hobbies, etc. in order to understand a consumer's motivations.  Using mobile devices, consumers can interact with brands anywhere, anytime, accessing deep product information and reviews.  Mobile, combined with a loyalty program, presents an opportunity to put shopping into geographic context, understanding paths to the store, patterns within the store, and be an always-on advertising conduit.

Omni-Channel Analytics

All this data along with the proper technology represents a new paradigm in which the clock is turned back and retail becomes very personal once again.  Rich, individualized data better illuminates demand, allows for highly localized assortments, and helps tailor up-selling.  Interactions with all channels help build an accurate profile of each consumer, and allows retailers to tailor the retail experience to meet the heightened expectations of today's sophisticated shopper.  And of course this culminates in greater customer satisfaction and business profitability.


David Dorf, Sr Director Technology Strategy for Oracle Retail, shares news and ideas about the retail industry with a focus on innovation and emerging technologies.

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