HTML5 and the Internet of Things

netflix-iphone.jpg
I remember when I switched from Blockbuster to Netflix so movies could be delivered to my door. What a great concept. Then I started streaming shows to my PC, and before long I got a Roku device so I could stream to the family room TV. Now I see Netflix is being included in Blu-ray players, game consoles, and TVs, and I just downloaded the Netflix player for my iPhone. I can see a movie practically anytime, anywhere thanks to The Internet of Things.

The retail industry has been buzzing with stories about the impact of mobile phones, but phones are just one "thing" that's out there. Soon it will be commonplace for TVs, cars, and refrigerators to be connected to the internet and information will be easily accessible. Retailers would be wise to think in these terms as they design their mobile infrastructure since mobile is simply step one. In the future I want to order products from all the connected devices I just mentioned.

The technologies that will make this happen are the wireless protocols in their many flavors, and the browser. Think about this: I can be talking to someone on my iPhone, walk into my house and have the call transferred via bluetooth to my home phone, which by-the-way is a VOIP system. Cellular to bluetooth to internet. Isn't wireless great?

What's holding us back is the lack of a consistent way to interact with these devices. Java was suppose to solve this issue, but it never really became widespread because people don't want to manage applications (and the JVM) on millions of devices. Browsers accessing the cloud makes perfect sense, if the browser could provide all the necessary capabilities required by modern applications. That's where HTML5 enters the scene, adding rich capabilities to browsers in a consistent manner.

So in the short-term its good to think about your mobile strategy, but also think about long-term strategies to leverage the internet of (smart) things.

Comments:

I am confused about what the author attempts to state here. Is it being stated that any device that has connectivity to internet needs to use HTML5? - Why would a device say for example phone, network printer, SAN devices or for the matter of fact any device that doesn't have a display device but connected to the internet, would use HTML5 for communicating with the cloud? I wouldn't even think that these devices need to have a browser engine built in.

Posted by guest on November 16, 2012 at 08:39 AM CST #

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David Dorf, Sr Director Technology Strategy for Oracle Retail, shares news and ideas about the retail industry with a focus on innovation and emerging technologies.


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