ZFS I/Os in motion

I'm walking a line - I'm thinking about I/O in motion
I'm walking a line - Just barely enough to be living
Get outta the way - No time to begin
This isn't the time - So nothing was biodone
Not talking about - Not many at all
I'm turning around - No trouble at all
You notice there's nothing around you, around you
I'm walking a line - Divide and dissolve.

[theme song for this post is Houses in Motion by the Talking Heads]

Previously, I mentioned a movie. OK, so perhaps it isn't a movie, but an animated GIF.

 

This is a time-lapse animation of some of the data shown in my previous blog on ZFS usage of mirrors. Here we're looking at one second intervals and the I/O to the slow disk of a two-disk mirrored ZFS file system. The workload is a recursive copy of the /usr/share directory into this file system.

The yellow areas on the device field are write I/O operations. For each time interval, the new I/O operations are shown with their latency elevators. Shorter elevators mean lower latency. Green elevators mean the latency is 10ms or less, yellow until 25ms, and red beyond 25ms. This provides some insight into the way the slab allocator works for ZFS. If you look closely, you can also see the redundant uberblock updates along the lower-right side near the edge. If you can't see that in the small GIF, click on the GIF for a larger version which is easier to see.

ZFS makes redundant copies of the metadata. By preference, these will be placed in a different slab. You can see this in the animation as there are occasionally writes further out than the bulk of the data writes. As the disk begins to fill, the gaps become filled.  Interestingly, the writes to the next slab (metadata) do not have much latency - they are in the green zone. This is a simple IDE disk, so there is a seek required by these writes. This should help allay one of the fears of ZFS, that the tendency to have data spread out will be a performance problem - I see no clear evidence of that here. 

I have implemented this as a series of Worldwind layers. This isn't really what Worldwind was designed to do, so there are some inefficiencies in the implementation, or it may be that there is still some trick I have yet to learn.  But it is functional in that you can see I/Os in motion.


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