Wednesday Jul 16, 2008

GlassFish V3 TP2, Liferay and OpenSSO

I am sure you want to be using the latest versions of GlassFish and Portal softwares in a secured environment

Ajit's blog does exactly the same, he has GlassFish V3 (known for modularity, extensibility, and embeddability ), latest Liferay source and latest OpenSSO build.

Please check Sahoo's one pager on GlassFish V3 Modularization using OSGi

Liferay is an open source portal and Sun is using Liferays codebase and contributing Sun features.  The project name for the same is Websynergy. OpenSSO is an open source  project for single sign on.  This blog describes how to integrate Liferay with OpenSSO on Glassfish V3 TP2



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Wednesday Jun 18, 2008

OpenPortal on SSL instance of GlassFish

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Trasport Layer Security (TLS) are cryptographic protocols that provide secure layer communication in the internet. The two are refered by the term SSL and are supported by GlassFish.

Ajit has this blog on how to Install OpenPortal 7.2 on SSL instance of GlassFish

GlassFish uses JSSE (Java Secured Socket Extension) for SSL implementation and JKS for keystore.

The steps described in the blog work for GlassFish V2 and GlassFish V3 TP2

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Sunday Jun 15, 2008

Security in GlassFish

Jagadesh is our technical expert on Security. He also has great deal of knowledge on SailFin and many other things.

He has this informative blog on security documentation in GlassFish, this could be your one stop on Security in GlassFish

Please post your questions/comments to his blog, he has depth of security knowledge, lets leverage it !

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Thursday Jun 05, 2008

GlassFish and Solaris Trusted Extensions

Solaris Trusted Extensions is one of the Most wanted features for enterprise customers, and GlassFish Enterprise customers also have a demand for it.

Jagadesh has the answer to this, Yes! Now we do have a way on How to Configure Solaris Trusted Extensions and run GlassFish Application Server

Trusted Extensions software package is a layered product on top of the Solaris operating system.

Trusted Extensions provides special security features that enable an organization to define and implement a security policy on a Solaris system. A security policy is the set of rules and practices that help protect information and other resources, such as computer hardware, at your site. Typically, security rules handle such issues as who has access to which information or who is allowed to write data to a removable media.

Jagadesh and Shaline have written this informative blog on How to Configure Solaris Trusted Extensions and run GlassFish Application Server

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Gopal Jorapur

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