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Pat Shuff's Blog

SQL Developer connection to DBaaS

Today we are going to connect to our database using SQL Developer. We could connect using sqlplus with a remote command but instead we are going to use a graphical tool to connect to our database in the cloud. It is important to note that this is the same tool that is used to connect to our on premise database. We can execute sql commands, look at the status of the database, clone pluggable databases from one service to another, and generally manipulate and manage the database with command line features of wizards.

SQL Developer is a free integrated development environment that simplifies the development and management of Oracle Database in both traditional and Cloud deployments. SQL Developer offers complete end-to-end development of your PL/SQL applications, a worksheet for running queries and scripts, a DBA console for managing the database, a reports interface, a complete data modeling solution, and a migration platform for moving your 3rd party databases to Oracle. There are a few books that have been written about this product.


as well as blogs
I suggest looking at the following

We are not going to dive deep into SQL Developer but rather introduce a couple of concepts for monitoring our database in the cloud. We are running version 4.1.3 on a Windows desktop. We actually are cheating a little bit and running it on a Windows 2012 Server that is provisioned into IaaS in the Oracle Cloud. It makes a good scratch space for demos and development hands on labs. When we connect we can connect to the public ip address of our database on port 1521 or we can create an ssh tunnel and connect to localhost on port 1521. We will first connect via an ssh tunnel. To start, we need to log into our database service and figure out what the ip address is for the system we provisioned. For our system we notice that the ip address is 129.152.150.120.



We are going to first connect with ip tunneling through putty. We launch putty and enter the ip address, the ssh keys, and open up port 1521 as a tunnel. We open a connection and all connections to port 1521 on localhost will be connected to our cloud service at the ip address specified. Note that this solution works if we have one database that we are connecting to. If we have two database instances in the cloud we will need to map a different port number on localhost to port 1521 or open up the ports to the internet which we will talk about later. We need to keep this shell active and open but we can iconify the window.


In SQL Developer we can now create a new connection to our database. This is done by clicking on the green plus sign in the top right of the screen. This opens a dialog window to define the connection to the database. We will call this connection prs12cHP which is the name of our service in the cloud. We are going to connect as sys so we need to select the advanced connection to connect as sysdba. It is important to note that you can not do this with Amazon RDS if you provision an Oracle database in the Amazon PaaS. Amazon does not allow you to login as sys or system and does not give you sysdba privileges. If you want sysdba access you will need to deploy Oracle into Amazon EC2 to get access. Once we define our connection to localhost, port 1521, sys as sysdba, and an OID of ORCL we can test our interface and accept the connection once it is successful. Note that we can execute commands in the right window and look at things like what version of the database we are running. In this example we are running the High Performance Edition so we can use diag and tuning extensions from SQL Developer.




There is a new DBA feature in the latest release of SQL Developer. We can launch a navigation menu to add our cloud database by going to the View ... DBA option at the top of the screen. This give us another green plus sign so that we can add the database and expose typical management views adn functions. Two things that are of note here are a simple exposure to pluggable database as well as a clone option associated with this exposure.




We can do other things like look at backup jobs, look at table space allocation and location, look at users that are authorized and active. This is not a replacement for Enterprise Manager because it is looking at immediate and not historic data.

Now that we have connected through a tunnel, let's look at another option. We can open up port 1521 on the database service and connect straight to the ip address. This method is not recommended because it opens up your database to all ip addresses on the internet if you are using a demo or evaluation account. You can whitelist ip addresses, vpn, or subnet limit the systems that it answers. This is done through the compute service management interface under the networking tab. We need to enable the dblistener for our database service. Once we do this we can connect SQL Developer to the database using the ip address of the database service. We might need to do this if we are connecting to multiple cloud servers and don't want to create a tunnel for each of them.





In summary, we have connected to our database service using SQL Developer. This is the same tool that we use to connect to databases in our data center. We can connect the same way that we normally do via an ip address or tunnel to keep the server in the cloud a little more secure. We noted the differences between the Amazon RDS and Oracle DBaaS options and provided a workaround with EC2 or Azure Compute as an alternative. It is important to remember the differences between PaaS features and IaaS features when it comes time to calculating the cost of services. PaaS gives you expanded features like automated backup and size up/down which we will look at next week.

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