Subscribe

Share

Human Capital Management

The Hybrid Workforce

How distant is your ERP system from the reality of modern business?

By Aaron Lazenby

Winter 2019

The winter 2019 issue edition of Profit focuses on issues related to human resources and is defined by some intriguing numbers about the future of work, reflected throughout the issue. Here are a few to consider:

  • 28% of business and HR leaders anticipate adding gig workers to their workforce.
  • 89% of Generation Z believe we are entering an era of human/machine partnerships.
  • 93% of workers would trust orders from a robot at work.

How should HR handle employee complaints about robot managers? How do procurement agents assist in the onboarding of gig workers, and how does Payroll accommodate their compensation? How will managers make decisions about what work should be done by robots and AI and which assignments should go to human workers?

As with cloud, different enterprises will adopt a next-generation workforce at a pace that makes sense for them. Nevertheless, the change is inevitable.

In the process of considering these questions (and talking to HR experts about the future of work), the Profit editorial team landed on a theme: “The Hybrid Workforce.” This is not only a reference to the various ways the workforce is changing but also a deliberate nod to the way Oracle often describes an IT platform on which on-premises and cloud-based systems coexist. I think there is a comparison to make here; as with cloud, different enterprises will adopt a next-generation workforce at a pace that makes sense for them. Nevertheless, the change is inevitable.

The Need 2 Know section paints a picture of the changes to come. As artificial intelligence increasingly searches for potential candidates, résumés will need to be designed to attract the attention of robot recruiters. As workers set up shop farther and farther away from HQ—such as in space, for instance—managers will need new tools and skills. Also, should people be doing work at all? All of these issues will influence the strategic decisions made by C-level executives and HR managers in the not-too- distant future.

Technology can also help offset potential workforce disruption. According to Emily He, senior vice president, Oracle Human Capital Management Product Marketing, in her column “Technology’s Human Touch,” “technology is a tool that works best when it enhances rather than replaces human insights and actions.”

In a marketplace where only a handful of experts might decide the success or failure of a business, it is essential to have a strategy—and the right technology—for attracting the best of the best.

Our cover story, “Safety First . . . and Fast,” featuring the City of Memphis, looks at how technology is helping solve the recruitment challenges of today. Mayor Jim Strickland made a promise to his constituents to improve public safety by expanding the police force and fire department, and there are unique requirements potential candidates must meet—including age, education, and work experience. Chief Human Resources Officer Alexandria Smith moved the city’s HR systems to the cloud to automate the tracking of these requirements—streamlining the application process and ultimately delivering nearly 600 new hires since 2016.

Recruitment challenges are also the central topic of “Searching High and Low.” This story addresses the quest for rare talent, summarizing strategies for reaching a talent pool as small as 100 qualified candidates. In a marketplace where only a handful of experts might decide the success or failure of a business, it is essential to have a strategy—and the right technology—for attracting the best of the best.

Action Item

Learn more about Oracle HCM Cloud.

Photography by Bob Adler/Getty Images; Lev Dolgachov/Alamy Stock Photo