JUGs and the JCP

JuggyThere are hundreds of Java User Groups (JUGs) around the world with thousands of passionate and committed members (see this list and this interactive map)

This week I am attending a User Group Summit at Oracle's headquarters in Redwood Shores, where I'm meeting with a number of Java User Group leaders to discuss how they and their members could become involved in the JCP.

Three years ago, in order to encourage developer involvement and to harness the energy and commitment of the JUG community, we waived the annual membership fees for JUGs. We now have more than 20 JUGs as members, with representatives from Europe, Asia, Africa, Russia, South America, and the USA.

At the beginning of the summit Steve Harris from Oracle announced to the JUG leaders that Oracle plans to nominate SouJava, the Brazilian Java User Group, to the seat on the Java SE/EE Executive Committee (EC) that was recently vacated by Apache. (A Special Election will be held shortly to fill three vacant seats.) SouJava's representative will be Bruno Souza, one of the founders and a recent president of the organization.

Brazilian flagSouJava is one of the largest JUGs in the world, with almost 20,000 members and several branches throughout Brazil. The organization was the first JUG to join the JCP, early in 2005, while Bruno himself was one of the first individuals to join the JCP (he's been a member since 2002.) Bruno has been a passionate supporter of open-source and of Java from its earliest days, and he would be a great asset to the Executive Committee, particularly as we work over the coming year to modify the organization's processes as we move into its second decade (more on this later.)

If elected, Bruno would be the second EC member from Brazil (Aguinaldo Boquimpani represents TOTVS on the ME EC.) This is appropriate, since Brazil is a major user of Java in both the private and the public sector. For example, the Brazilian National Healthcare System has been called largest Enterprise Java application ever built, with over 2M lines of code, while starting in 2009 all income tax forms in Brazil must be submitted electronically using a Java application. (By the way, Bruno tells me that he wrote much of the Brazilian tax application, so this nomination seems particularly appropriate.) For more on Java in Brazil see my 2008 article in Java Developers' Journal.

Java User Groups, the JCP, and Brazil: a winning combination!

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Patrick Curran

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