Friday Feb 07, 2014

Heads up! Regression in Solaris 10 Kernel patch 15040[01]-0[67] - now fixed in 15040[01]-09

Update:  Bug 17628036 is fixed in Solaris 10 patch 15040[01]-09 and Solaris 11.1 SRU16, both of which are now available on MOS.  Customers with 15040[01]-0[78] installed are recommended to install 15040[01]-09.  The Solaris 10 January CPU (Critical Patch Update) has been respun to included 15040[01]-09 and is available from MOS:

https://updates.oracle.com/download/18074667.html (SPARC)
https://updates.oracle.com/download/18074668.html (x86)
The issue is far less common on Solaris 11, so you only need to update to SRU16 if you experience the issue.  There will be a further "mop-up" fix in 15040[01]-10 and a later SRU, but 15040[01]-09 resolves the main issue and should be sufficient for most customers (addresses 95%+ of the instances reported).

Original post:

Please note that there's an issue with revs -06 and -07 of the Solaris 10 Kernel patches 15040[01].

Please see Sun Alert 1619580.1 on MOS for further details.  A number of Solaris 10 customers have hit the 2nd of the reported issues. 

We've respun the Solaris 10 January CPU (Critical Patch Update) to revert to rev-05 (now available from MOS), we're expediting a fixed rev-09 (rev-08 won't be released), and have withdrawn revs -06 and -07 from release.  Update: The Solaris 10 January CPU and Recommended patchset have been respun to include the fixed rev-09.

15040[01]-09 will address Bug 17628036 and the current ETA for expedited release is Feb 21.

The Solaris 11 fix is also being expedited in Solaris 11.1 SRU16, but seems to be less prone to the issue.

I apologize for the inconvenience caused.

Thursday Sep 12, 2013

Solaris 10 Patches Now On Monthly Release Cadence

(Updated Nov 25, 2013)

We've recently moved to a monthly release cadence for Solaris 10 OS patches.

New Solaris 10 OS patches are now available from MOS by the Tuesday closest to 17th of each month. 

The updated Solaris 10 OS Recommended Patchset will be available by the next day, Wednesday, assuming there are new patches released which meet its inclusion criteria - that is, patches which address security or other critical issues.

This enables customers to predict patch release dates and schedule maintenance windows.

This is similar to the monthly release cadence for Solaris Repository Updates (SRUs) for Solaris 11.

Please note that the Solaris 10 OS Recommended Patchset may not be updated every month.  This is because in some months there may be no new patches meeting the inclusion criteria.  That is, patches which address security, availability, data corruption, or other critical issues.

Friday Mar 22, 2013

Solaris 10 1/13 patchset released and latest Solaris 10 Kernel PatchIDs

Posting updated June 6, 2013, with new Solaris 10 Kernel PatchIDs 150400-xx (SPARC) and 150401-xx (x86):

As usual, we've released a patchset of all the patches contained in Solaris 10 1/13 (Update 11):

We've also included an important post-S10U11 patch - 150125-01 (SPARC) / 149637-02 (x86) - in this patchset, which fixes ZFS Bug 15809921.  See Doc 1535270.1.

This patchset can be applied to any existing Solaris 10 system to bring all pre-existing packages up to the same software level as Solaris 10 1/13.

It is not the same as upgrading to Solaris 10 1/13 (available here), as upgrading will additionally install any new packages delivered in the Update. 

I've also updated my Solaris 10 Kernel PatchID sequence posting with the latest Solaris 10 Kernel PatchIDs, namely: 

  • The Solaris 10 1/13 Kernel patch, 147147-26 (SPARC) / 147148-26 (x86)
  • Post Solaris 10 1/13 Kernel patches have the PatchIDs 148888-xx (SPARC) / 148889-xx (x86)

Please note that there are no more planned updates to Solaris 10, so these latest Kernel PatchIDs - 148888-xx (SPARC) / 148889-xx (x86) - will continue to be used for the foreseeable future.

Murphy's Law strikes again!

No sooner had I written that Solaris 10 Kernel PatchIDs 148888-xx (SPARC) and 148889-xx (x86) were here to stay for the foreseeable future, than the integration of the SR-IOV feature into rev-04 of these patches made it prudent to rejuvenate them. 

So from July 2013, the Solaris 10 Kernel PatchIDs will change to be 150400-xx (SPARC) and 150401-xx (x86).

Dare I tempt fate again by saying these Solaris 10 PatchIDs are likely to remain the same for the foreseeable future ?

I've also updated my Useful Patch Related Downloads posting with links to the Solaris 10 1/13, Jan 2013 CPU, and latest Recommended patchsets.

Friday Oct 19, 2012

October 2012 Security "Critical Patch Update" (CPU) information and downloads released

The October 2012 security "Critical Patch Update" information and downloads are now available from My Oracle Support (MOS).

See http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/alerts-086861.html and in particular Document 1475188.1 on My Oracle Support (MOS), http://support.oracle.com, which includes security CVE mappings for Oracle Sun products.

For Solaris 11, Doc 1475188.1 points to the relevant SRUs containing the fixes for each issue.  SRU12.4 was released on the CPU date and contains the current cumulative security fixes for the Solaris 11 OS.

For Solaris 10, we take a copy of the Recommended Solaris OS patchset containing the relevant security fixes and rename it as the October CPU patchset on MOS.  See link provided from Doc 1475188.1

Doc 1475188.1 also contains references for Firmware, etc., and links to other useful security documentation, including information on Userland/FOSS vulnerabilities and fixes in https://blogs.oracle.com/sunsecurity/

Wednesday Aug 15, 2012

SPARC SuperDuperCluster

Hi Folks!

Some of you may have noticed that I've been a little quieter than usual in the last year.

Is it because I've lost interest in patching, maintenance best practices, and improving our customers' lifecycle experience ?  Not a bit of it.

It's because my team and I have been rather busy - to put it mildly! - on developing the installation configuration utilities and maintenance updates for SPARC SuperCluster.

SPARC SuperCluster is so good, and the feedback from the already substantial customer base has been so positive, that I'm lobbying Marketing to rename it SPARC SuperDuperCluster.

Available in half rack (2 T4-4s, 3 Exadata Storage Cells) or full rack (4 T4-4s, 7 Exadata Storage Cells) configurations, both of which have a general purpose 7320 ZFSSA (ZFS Storage Appliance) and 3 Infiniband Switches, SPARC SuperDuperCluster is the prime example of the integrated Oracle Red Stack at its best.

It is a true example of an Engineered System, engineered with enhancements at every layer of the Red Stack to improve performance, robustness, and quality, from the phenomenal performance of the SPARC T4 chips, through to the excellent LDoms (Logical Domains) virtualization layer, enhancements such as RDSv3 support in Solaris as well as all the other great feature of Solaris 11 (and 10), to leveraging the phenomenal performance of Infiniband, Exadata Storage Cells and the 11gR2 database.

Seemingly paradoxically, SPARC SuperDuperCluster is both a highly flexible General Purpose "app" consolidation platform and an Engineered System, offering a wide variety of optimized configurations with various combinations of 11gR2 database domains, Solaris 11 General Purpose "app" domains, and Solaris 10 General Purpose "app" domains.

But how can SPARC SuperDuperCluster be both an Engineered System and offer extremely flexible configurations at the same time ?  That's easy.  The hardware layer and cabling is fixed in an optimized fashion (Engineered).  But what apps a customer chooses to run on SuperCluster, on how many LDoms and what memory/CPU is allocated to each is up to them, optimized for their needs (Flexible), rather than a one-size-fits-none approach.

SPARC SuperDuperCluster is more than just the hardware and software.  It's also the extraordinary cross-organizational team that has been built around it.  From the absolute cream of Services, Support, and Sustaining, to the architects and management from Performance Technologies, to the cooperation and deep engagement between engineering teams for each layer of the Oracle Red Stack, to my own small but extremely dedicated install configuration utility and maintenance update team, it's the people behind SPARC SuperDuperCluster which ensure its success. 

Feedback from the rapidly growing customer install base worldwide is extremely positive.  To find out more, please see the SPARC SuperCluster resource page.  You'll be hearing lots more about SPARC SuperDuperCluster at Oracle Open World this year - wow, it's nearly that time of year again! - but, for once, I won't be presenting myself.

I will be there and available to meet/talk either about Solaris 10 Patching, Solaris 11 SRUs (Support Repository Updates), or SPARC SuperDuperCluster.  I look forward to seeing you there!

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Tuesday Nov 29, 2011

New Solaris 11 Customer Maintenance Lifecycle blog

Hi Folks,

On the basis that you can't have too much of a good thing, I've started a 2nd blog, the Solaris11Life blog , to enable me to blog about all aspects of the Solaris 11 Customer Maintenance Lifecycle, including policies, best practices, resource links, clarifications, and anything else which I hope you may find useful.

In my first post, I share my Solaris 11 Customer Maintenance Lifecycle presentation, which I gave at Oracle Open World and the recent Deutsche Oracle Anwendergruppe (DOAG) conference.

I'll be posting lots more there in the coming week as time allows, including secret handshake stuff on how to interpret IPS FMRI version strings.

In future, I'll post any Solaris 11 Customer Maintenance Lifecycle related material on the Solaris11Life blog, http://blogs.oracle.com/Solaris11Life , and any Solaris 10 or below material here on the Patch Corner blog, http://blogs.oracle.com/patch .

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Wednesday Oct 05, 2011

Solaris 10 8/11 (Update 10) Patchset now available

Hi Folks,

The Solaris 10 8/11 (Update 10) patchset is now available from My Oracle Support.  Here's direct links to the common README and the SPARC and x86 downloads.  You need to be logged into MOS and have a valid support contract associated with your account in order to download the patchsets.

BTW: Please see my previous blog posting for details on other useful direct links to Solaris patch downloads and metadata.

As you may know by now, these patchsets will bring all pre-existing packages up to the same software level as the corresponding Solaris Update.  For example, all ZFS and Zones functionality is entirely contained in pre-existing packages, so applying the patchset will provide all the ZFS and Zones functionality and bug fixes contained in the corresponding Solaris Update.  

When we release the Solaris Update patchset, we try to fix any serious late breaking issues found with the corresponding Solaris Update patchset.  A list of additional patches added and the Caveats they address is contained in the patchset README.

Applying the patchset is not the same as upgrading to the Solaris Update release, as the patchset will not include any new packages introduced in the Solaris Update or any obsolete packages deleted in the Update.   

Please see this blog posting for lists of the new packages introduced in each Solaris Update to see if any of them are relevant to you.  If they are, then upgrade to a release which provides them.  If they're not, then applying the patchset may be a reasonable alternative to update your Solaris system. 

As with previous Updates, there are a small number of "special" or "script" patches whose sole purpose is to correct issues in the pre-application of patches to the Solaris Update release image.  Since these patches have no purpose whatsoever outside of the Solaris Update build process, they are not released to SunSolve/MOS.   Newer "special" patches have PatchIDs of the format 800xxx to make them easily identifiable, but old "special"/"script" patches are identifable by the words "SPECIAL PATCH" and/or "script patch" in the patch synopsis.  They are listed at the end of the SPARC and x86 patch lists.

Health Warning: Do not manually apply packages from a later Solaris release to an earlier Solaris release (e.g. by pulling individual packages from an ISO image) as this will result in an inconsistent system state which may lead to system corruption unless careful post-processing is done at the time such packages are applied to ensure that any patches applied to either the pre-existing packages on the system or pre-applied to the new packages been added are reapplied to the system to ensure both the pre-existing and new packages are at the same patch level.  Failure to do this will compromise the patch utilities ability to resolve patch dependencies leading to undefined results.  Even if you take the above steps, Support are likely to frown upon such shenanigans.  So don't do it.  If you need new packages, upgrade to a release which provides them.  Note, Live Upgrade packages are the only exception to this rule and the procedure for them is specified in the Live Upgrade documentation.  

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Tuesday Sep 27, 2011

I'm Presenting at Oracle OpenWorld and I Hope to See You There

I hope to see you next week at Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco.

Pete Dennis, Isaac Rosenfeld, and I will be giving a presentation on the Solaris 11 Customer Maintenance Lifecycle, which will provide an introduction to how we expect customers to maintain Solaris 11 systems, comparing and contrasting it to the Solaris 10 experience.

I believe the compelling advantages of ZFS Root Snapshots and Image Packaging System (IPS) have the potential to dramatically improve our customers' maintenance experience.

I'm sure you, like me, will be delighted to hear that there will be no patches and no patching in Solaris 11.  Neither is there a need to use technologies like Live Upgrade to provide a safety net - it's all baked into core Solaris 11 for you.

It's my intention to provide customers with much more up front guidance on how best to maintain Solaris 11, so customers don't need to figure out their maintenance strategy from scratch.

But we also remain committed to providing the flexibility to meet individual customer's needs and special circumstances.

So if you're at OpenWorld, please come along and hear Pete, Isaac, and I introduce you to the Solaris 11 maintenance lifecycle:

3:30pm, Tuesday, Oct 4th

Moscone South, Room 200

Pete Dennis and I will also be presenting at the Deutsche Oracle Anwendergruppe (DOAG) conference in N├╝rnberg in November 15-17, so if we don't see you at OpenWorld, we hope to see you there.

I really want to get your feedback on our current plans - what you like, what you don't like, and what we can improve.  So come along and let me know.

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Monday Aug 29, 2011

Using smpatch to apply Solaris Cluster patches and other enhancements

It is now possible again to use the in-built Solaris 10 patch automation utility, 'smpatch' / Update Manager, to download patches for products such as Oracle Solaris Cluster and Oracle Solaris Studio, as well as Oracle Solaris Operating System patches. 

It is now also possible again to use 'smpatch' / Update Manager on 3rd party hardware. 

To utilize these capabilities, the system must be registered or re-registered as outlined in https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&id=1347266.1

These steps effectively switch 'smpatch' / Update Manager from using hardware serial number based access entitlement to User based access entitlement, similar to the access entitlement mechanism used when downloading patches via 'wget' or manually via My Oracle Support (MOS).

The following patches are required to provide this functionality:

SPARC
121118-19  SunOS 5.10: Update Connection System Client 1.0.19
123893-25  SunOS 5.10: Cacao Patch
123005-09  SunOS 5.10: Basic Registration Update
124171-08  SunOS 5.10: SCN Base cacao module patch
123630-04  SunOS 5.10: HTTP proxy settings patch
x86
121119-19  SunOS 5.10_x86: Update Connection System Client 1.0.19
123896-25  SunOS 5.10_x86: Cacao Patch
123006-09  SunOS 5.10_x86: Basic Registration Update
124187-08  SunOS 5.10_x86: SCN Base cacao module patch
123631-04  SunOS 5.10_x86: HTTP proxy settings patch

'smpatch' / Update Manager patch 12111[89]-19 introduces other significant changes due to the migration to Oracle back-end infrastructure.  The download server and security certs have changed.  As My Oracle Support supports ".zip" file download only, this patch mandatorily migrates 'smpatch' / Update Manager from using ".jar" downloads to using ".zip" downloads.

Caveat: There is currently an issue affecting LPS (Local Proxy Server) functionality following the migration to the Oracle back-end infrastructure.  This issue is currently being worked on.

Thursday Aug 11, 2011

Applying the latest Solaris patches using Ops Center Enterprise Manager

A couple of customers have claimed to me that it's not possible to apply all the latest available Solaris patches using Ops Center Enterprise Manager.  I've checked with my colleagues in Ops Center, and it most certainly is possible.  Here's one way to do it: 

There are multiple ways to perform this task ...

Here is one using the "Report" feature:

1) Select "Host Compliance Report"

2) Use the default setting "Security and Bug fixes" and select proposed target system or group of targets:

3) The Report will show all downrev packages (e.g 824 pkgs) and will allow you to submit a job, that's all that's needed.

Looking at the Job log we can see:

# tail /var/scn/update-agent/logs/resolve.log

add 40025552 (145497-01)

add 40025545 (144998-03)

add 40025534 (145501-01)

add 40025472 (118712-24)

add 40025471 (121734-13)

add 40025380 (118777-17)

add 40024414 (125060-07)

add 40022356 (119788-10)

add 40015326 (121081-08)

Total number of sorted operations : 197

So in total we would install 197 patches.

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Tuesday Feb 15, 2011

Using My Oracle Support for Hardware Products

My colleagues in Services are running Best Practice Webinars on knowledge searching and how to find Firmware, Storage updates, and Oracle Solaris patchsets.

The next sessions for patching are this Thursday, Feb 18th, at 9AM MT (U.S. Mountain Time) and 5PM MT.  If you miss these, don't worry, there's more being hosted through to the end of April 2011.  See below.

Log into MOS and see https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=SYSTEMDOC&id=1282218.1 for details.

Here's the blurb:

Our new seminar series titled "Using My Oracle Support for Hardware Products" covers a variety of topics focused on using My Oracle Support to service your hardware products. The seminar series includes five Advisor Webcast topics for customers using Solaris or Sun Hardware. The topics are repeated throughout the schedule. The schedule  runs from 8 February through 28 April.  To see the schedule and to register for a session, please review Advisor Webcasts: My Oracle Support - Best Practices for Hardware Customers

    \* Best practice on knowledge searching and how to find Firmware, Storage updates, and Oracle Solaris patch sets
    \* Hardware Asset and Automated Service Request (ASR) Management
    \* Automatic Service Request from end to end
    \* Proactive Hardware Service Portal
    \* My Oracle Support - Hardware Service Request

Oracle support experts will be on hand to present these topics and answer questions about best practices in using My Oracle Support for servicing your supported hardware products.

Friday Jan 28, 2011

Resolving 'smpatch' / Update Manager issues

A number of customers have reported issues with 'smpatch' / Update Manager resulting from the recent migration to the My Oracle Support (MOS) infrastructure.

My colleagues BethB, PeterM, and EthanR have published Document 1288579.1 which explains what to do if you are unable to register systems & download patches via sconadm, smpatch, and Update Manager . This document is also accessible via the Oracle Sun OS Community page too.

I apologize most sincerely for any inconvenience caused.

Thursday Jan 13, 2011

List of new and up'rev'd packages in each Solaris 10 Update

Here are lists in .pdf (SPARC / x86) and OpenOffice (SPARC / x86) format of new and up'rev'd packages in each Solaris 10 Update release.

As you may know from my previous blog postings, Oracle Sun recommends customers to install or upgrade to the latest Solaris 10 Update in major maintenance windows. Based on a request from customers whose change control policies prevent them from upgrading, we've been producing Solaris Update Patch Bundles which bring pre-existing packages up to the same software level as the corresponding Solaris Update.  The difference is that the Patch Bundles don't provide new or up'rev'd packages introduced in the corresponding Solaris Update.

For customers considering use of the Solaris Update Patch Bundles, that raises the obvious question as to which packages are introduced or up'rev'd in each Solaris Update release.  The lists above answer that question.

Aside: As discussed in previous blog postings, all core Solaris OS packages are updated via patches.  The up'rev'd packages above refer to some 3rd party and community based apps included in Solaris (e.g. Mozilla Firefox, Thunderbird, etc.) which are updated via package updates (i.e. where one package version is removed and replaced with a later version).  This is to tie in better with the release strategy for such apps.

Many thanks to my colleague, Roisin Doran, for all her work in putting this together.

I'll ask Roisin to work with the Technical Writers to include updated versions of these lists in future Solaris 10 Update release documentation.

Monday Jan 10, 2011

Searching for Oracle Sun patches in My Oracle Support (MOS)

My colleague, Mike Brown, has published this knowledge article which you may wish to bookmark, pointing to frequently accessed Oracle Solaris patch deliverables, including the Recommended patch clusters, quarterly Critical Patch Updates (CPUs), Solaris Update Patch Bundles, patch utilitiy patches, patchdiag.xref, the checksums file, and the LU Zones Starter Patch Bundle.

Also, here's a cut-and-paste of my response to some comments posted regarding finding Oracle Sun patches on My Oracle Support (MOS) which I hope you'll find useful.

To get the Solaris patch clusters and patch bundles, use the "Product or Family (Advanced Search)" option on the "Patches & Updates" tab. Select:

  • Product is Solaris Operating System
  • Release is Solaris 10 Operating System
  • select "Type" instead of "Platform" and Type is "Patchset"

...and it'll return all Solaris 10 patch clusters and patch bundles. This includes the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Clusters, the Solaris Update Patch Bundles, the Solaris OS Critical Patch Updates (CPUs), Live Upgrade (LU) Zones Patch Bundle, etc.

You can add further search filters, e.g. Platform is Oracle Solaris on SPARC (64-bit), to further refine the results.

Using "Platform" is useful to eliminate the double-entries for 32-bit and 64-bit. These dual returns are a pet peeve of mine and I'm continuing to work with the MOS team to get this "fixed" in a future release. They are an historical artifact from Oracle DB platform porting and are not relevant to the Solaris OS.

Note that the alternative option for "Type" is "Patch", which can be used to search for individual patches.

Please note that you can see all revisions of a patch by searching with the format 119254-% . The "-" (dash) is required in the current version of MOS.

You can also search for words included in the Patch Synopsis by using the Description field. For example:

  • Product is Solaris Operating System
  • Release is Solaris 10 Operating System
  • Type is Patch
  • Platform is Oracle Solaris on SPARC (64-bit)
  • Description contains patch utilities

In the example above, the Description option searches for the phrase "patch utilities" in the Synopsis line of patches. This returns the Solaris 10 SPARC patch utility patches.

Since the synopsis line of patches is free format, some guesswork is involved in searching using this method. For example "patch utility" returns nothing. "IP" returns more than just TCP/IP related patches.

Alternatively, you can use "Classification", which can be set to "Security" to return Security patches.

Click on the "Updated" column in the search returns to get these listed from earliest to latest or vice versa.

Firmware updates are also available from My Oracle Support.

  • Click on "Produce or Family (Advanced Search)".
  • Select the hardware product you are interested in.   For example, type "x6" and select, Product is Sun Blade X6440 Server 
    Module.
  • Select the Release(s) you are interested in, e.g. Release is X6440 SW 2.2.0
  • Click Search.

My understanding is that MOS currently limits search results to 100 entries in the current version and again I'm discussing "fixing" this with the MOS team in a later release.

Searches can be edited and saved for re-use at a later date.  MOS also remembers selections you've made in previous sessions which is a useful feature.

A "Classification" of "Other Recommended" rather logically will give other non-security recommended patches included in the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Cluster. (In MOS terminology, "Security" and "Other Recommended" together are equivalent of the old Sun "Recommended" term.) But if you want to know exactly what's in the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Cluster, it's easier to simply look at the patch  list in the Cluster README.

As discussed in the http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/solaris_10_recommended_patching_strategy which I published last week, we're really trying to encourage customers to move away from selecting unique patch combinations and to instead use the Solaris OS patch clusters and patch bundles as the core of your patching strategy.

But there is still occasionally the need to search for individual patches to address specific issues.

If you are looking for individual patches to address a specific CR, then use "Patch Name, Number, or Sun CR ID" search option instead of "Product or Family (Advanced Search)". For example, enter Sun CR ID 6927931 and patch 119254-78 is returned which is the patch in which the CR is fixed. A CR which was fixed a long time ago, e.g. 6486471, will return all patch revisions which contain the fix, so you can decide whether you want to take the latest patch revision which fixes it or the earliest.

As I say, I'm continuing to work with the MOS team to enhance the customer experience further, but I hope you find the above tips helpful.

A colleague in MOS has kindly forwarded a link to a tutorial on the PowerView feature in MOS which you may find useful.

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Thursday Jan 06, 2011

Solaris 10 Recommended Patching Strategy

Here's a document and a corresponding presentation I've written describing the Oracle Solaris 10 Recommended Patching Strategy. They contain a number of links to resources which I hope you will find useful.

As always, I look forward to your feedback.

BTW: If you have any queries about patching, why not post them on the Oracle Solaris Install, Booting, and Patching Community Forum.

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Friday Dec 10, 2010

SunSolve to MOS transition this weekend

The SunSolve front page says it all:

The MSC and SunSolve Will Retire on December 10, 2010

Find out what you need to know about the migration to My Oracle Support.

Stay up-to-date on the latest details about the migration to My Oracle Support. Access the My Oracle Support Welcome Center for transition information, training, significant changes, and Frequently Asked Questions.

The information on the Welcome Center will be updated regularly as the transition approaches, so please be sure to revisit the page often to get the latest updates.

See my previous postings, Oracle Sun patches now available from MOS , and Test site available for SunSolve to MOS transition for details on how to download patches from My Oracle Support (MOS).

Please note that I am not leading this transition and I will be unable to help with issues regarding access entitlement.

If you encounter issues with My Oracle Support, then:

  1. If you can log into MOS, use the "Contact Us" link to file a Service Request
  2. If you can't log into MOS, call Oracle support
I wish you a successful transition.


Thursday Nov 18, 2010

Test site available for SunSolve to MOS transition changes

My SunSolve colleagues tell me that the ability to test sample scripted My Oracle Support (MOS) patch downloads is now available. 

If you use scripted patch downloads, e.g. using 'wget', I highly recommend you take this opportunity to test the necessary changes to the download syntax in advance of the transition from SunSolve to MOS which is currently scheduled for December 10.

The document detailing the 'wget' syntax changes relating to the upcoming transition from SunSolve to MOS, http://sunsolve.sun.com/search/document.do?assetkey=1-79-1199543.1-1, has been updated with the relevant instructions.  I suggest you bookmark that document and return to it regularly for updates.

Friday Oct 15, 2010

Using Live Upgrade in complex environments

One of my senior engineers, Enda O'Connor, has written a document on Patching Solaris using Advanced Live Upgrade Strategies for Zones and Clusters which I hope you will find useful.

Enjoy!

Solaris Updates and Patch Bundles in the picture

A colleague of mine, Ken Brucker, has drawn this picture showing the composition of Solaris Updates which you may find useful to visualize the process.  

See the relevant slides from the presentation on http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/updated_customer_patching_presentation_and for more detailed information.

Thursday Oct 14, 2010

Goodbye SunSolve, Helloooo MOS!

As Miriam Brace's recent blog post signals, it's nearly time to say goodbye to SunSolve as the transition to My Oracle Support (MOS) continues.

There's syntax changes for 'wget' users which are detailed on SunSolve and copied on ISP.  This document includes details on how to continue to access the patch metadata files 'patchdiag.xref' and 'checksums'.

As per my previous posting, Oracle Sun patches and patch clusters/bundles are already available from MOS.

Expect to hear more news on the migration, including timelines, in the near future.  SunSolve and Miriam's blog are good sources of up to date information.

Tuesday Oct 12, 2010

Oct 2010 Solaris OS CPU now available

The October 2010 Solaris OS CPU (Critical Patch Updates) containing all available Security, Data Corruption, and System Availability fixes are now available from My Oracle Support (MOS) and SunSolve.

See http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/alerts-086861.html and in particular Document 1446032.1 on My Oracle Support (MOS), http://support.oracle.com, which includes CVE mappings for Oracle Sun products. 

To access the Solaris OS CPUs on MOS, login, select the "Patches & Updates" tab and in the "Patch Search" box, click on "Product or Family (Advanced Search)".  Select "Solaris Operating System" from the product drop down menu, select the Release(s) you are interested in, e.g. "Solaris 10 Operating System", select "Type" and "Patchset" from the drop down menus on the next line, and click "Search".  This will show all the available patch clusters and bundles for your search criteria.  The October 2010 CPUs have titles of the form "CPU OS Cluster 2010/10".

The Solaris OS CPUs are archived copies of the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Clusters.  See http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/solaris_critical_patch_updates_cpus for further details.

Best Wishes,

Gerry Haskins
Director, Software Patch Services

Monday Sep 27, 2010

Patching Strategy, Oracle Open World Presentation

Hi Folks,

Here's the presentation on Oracle Solaris Patching Strategy and Best Practices which Bob Netherton and I gave last week at Oracle Open World.

It was really great to meet so many customers.  If you have any patch related questions, please feel free to follow up with me.

Best Wishes,

Gerry Haskins
Director, Software Patch Services, Solaris Systems.

Saturday Sep 18, 2010

Solaris 10 9/10 (Update 9) Patch Bundle now available

The Solaris 10 9/10 (Update 9) Patch Bundles are now available from SunSolve and My Oracle Support (MOS).

These patch bundles provides the set of patch pre-applied into the corresponding Solaris 10 9/10 (Update 9) release image.  These patches provide all the Solaris 10 bug fixes which were available when the contents of the Solaris 10 9/10 release was finalized.

See http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/solaris_10_10_08_patch for further information on Solaris Update Patch Bundles.

See http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/oracle_sun_patches_now_available for information on how to access patch bundles on MOS.

Many thanks to the Patch System Test, Patch Operations and Distribution, and SunSolve teams for expediting the release of these patch bundles.

Thursday Aug 05, 2010

Updated Customer Patching Presentation (and other stuff)

I've updated my Patching Presentation for customers, see http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/patch_presentation_for_customers

I hope you find it useful.

Also, I forgot to blog about an enhancement we made in March 2010 to the Solaris Update Patch Bundles.  The Solaris Update Patch Bundles now add a line to /etc/release when they are installed to make it easier to determine that they've been applied - i.e. that all pre-existing packages on the system have been patched up to the same software level as the corresponding Solaris Update.

On a related note, Oracle 11gR2 requires customers to have Solaris 10 10/08 (Update 6) installed.  From Version 11.2.0.3 it will accept the corresponding Solaris Update Patch Bundle as being sufficient to meet this requirement.  The modification of /etc/release by the Solaris Update Patch Bundle is partially to help support this.

Thursday Jul 29, 2010

Oracle Sun patches now available from My Oracle Support (MOS)

As you may already know, Oracle Sun patches are now available from My Oracle Support (MOS).

We've uploaded over 30,000 6-2 digit PatchIDs to MOS, including all Solaris 8, 9, and 10 patches, SunCluster, and patches for over a thousand other products.  Any patch for these products which was available on SunSolve is now also available from MOS, making MOS your one stop support shop for all Oracle products.

My colleague David F. Campbell has also completed the upload of all patch and firmware update content to MOS from CDS (Content Delivery System, formerly the Sun DownLoad Center (SDLC)).

Any another colleague, Tom Murray, has completed the upload of StorageTek patch content natively to MOS too. Most StorageTek patches are in a mainframe patch format and are not applied using the Solaris 'patchadd' utility.  To host them on SunSolve after the StorageTek acquistion, we wrapped them in a 6-2 digit PatchID.  However, it doesn't make sense to wrap these StorageTek 6-2 digit PatchIDs in Oracle BugDB IDs which would be a second level of indirection.  Therefore, Tom has uploaded them in their native format to MOS.

Customers with an Oracle support contract can log into My Oracle Support.  The full functionality version is Flash based, https://support.oracle.com.   There is also a limited functionality html version, https://supporthtml.oracle.com .

Click on the "Patches & Updates" tab and you'll see that the Patch Search options have been expanded to "Patch Name, Number or Sun CR ID".  As it suggests, you can search by the 6-2 digit PatchID or a Sun CR (Change Request) number (i.e. 7 digit BugID).

Please note that you can see all revisions of a patch by searching with the format 119254-% .  The "-" (dash) is required in the current version of MOS.

To get the Solaris patch clusters and patch bundles, use the "Product or Family (Advanced Search)" option on the "Patches & Updates" tab. Select:

  • Product is Solaris Operating System
  • Release is Solaris 10 Operating System
  • Select "Type" instead of "Platform" and Type is "Patchset"

...and it'll return all Solaris 10 patch clusters and patch bundles. This includes the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Clusters, the Solaris Update Patch Bundles, the Solaris OS Critical Patch Updates (CPUs), Live Upgrade (LU) Zones Patch Bundle, etc.

You can add further search filters, e.g. Platform is Oracle Solaris on SPARC (64-bit), to further refine the results.

Using "Platform" is useful to eliminate the double-entries for 32-bit and 64-bit.  These dual returns are a pet peeve of mine and I'm continuing to work with the MOS team to get this "fixed" in a future release.  They are an historical artifact from Oracle DB platform porting and are not relevant to the Solaris OS.

Note that the alternative option for "Type" is "Patch", which can be used to search for individual patches.

For example:

  • Product is Solaris Operating System
  • Release is Solaris 10 Operating System
  • Type is Patch
  • Platform is Oracle Solaris on SPARC (64-bit)
  • Description contains patch utilities

In the example above, the Description option searches for the phrase "patch utilities" in the Synopsis line of patches. This returns the Solaris 10 SPARC patch utility patches.

Since the synopsis line of patches is free format, some guesswork is involved in searching using this method. For example "patch utility" returns nothing. "IP" returns more than just TCP/IP related patches. "firmware" returns any patch with the word "firmware" in its Synopsis.

Alternatively, you can use "Classification", which can be set to "Security" to return Security patches.

Click on the "Updated" column in the search returns to get these listed from earliest to latest or vice versa.

My understanding is that MOS currently limits search results to 100 entries in the current version and again I'm discussing "fixing" this with the MOS team in a later release.

Searches can be edited and saved for reuse at a later date.

A "Classification" of "Other Recommended" rather logically will give other non-security recommended patches included in the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Cluster. (In MOS terminology, "Security" and "Other Recommended" together are equivalent of the old Sun "Recommended" term.) But if you want to know exactly what's in the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Cluster, it's easier to simply look at the patch list in the Cluster README.

As discussed in the http://blogs.sun.com/patch/entry/solaris_10_recommended_patching_strategy which I published yesterday, we're really trying to encourage customers to move away from selecting unique patch combinations and to instead use the Solaris OS patch clusters and patch bundles as the core of your patching strategy.

If you are looking for individual patches to address a specific CR, then use "Patch Name, Number, or Sun CR ID" search option instead of "Product or Family (Advanced Search)". For example, enter Sun CR ID 6927931 and patch 119254-78 is returned which is the patch in which the CR is fixed. A CR which was fixed a long time ago, e.g. 6486471, will return all patch revisions which contain the fix, so you can decide whether you want to take the latest patch revision which fixes it or the earliest.

For firmware patches:

  • Go to the "Patches & Updates" tab
  • Click on "Produce or Family (Advanced Search)"
  • Select the hardware product in which you are interested.  For example, type "x6" and select, Product is Sun Blade X6440 Server Module.
  • Select the Release(s) you are interested in, e.g. Release is X6440 SW 2.2.0
  • Click Search.

As I say, I'm continuing to work with the MOS team to enhance the customer experience further, but I hope you find the above tips helpful.

 So which Oracle Sun patches are currently available from MOS ?:

  • Over 30,000 Oracle Sun 6-2 digit PatchIDs (i.e. of the format xxxxxx-xx) for over a thousand products and product versions.  This includes all Solaris 8, 9, and 10 patches, SunCluster patches, etc.
  • All the Oracle Sun Patch Clusters and Patch Bundles
  • All the patch and firmware update content previously hosted on CDS (Content Delivery System, formerly the Sun DownLoad Center (SDLC))
  • All StorageTek patches

What's not transitioned to MOS ?:

  • Really, really old patches, such as SunOS 1.x patches, Solaris 7 and older patches, etc.   These are utterly obsolete products so there's no point in propagating this crud forward.
  • Public patches available without a support contract, such as OpenOffice and StarOffice patches.  It is planned to support these in a future MOS release.  In the meantime, they can be downloaded from https://sspatch.oracle.com/showMe.do?page=public
  • Some patch metadata files such as the "Checksum" and "patchdiag.xref" files.  It is planned to support these in a future MOS release.  In the meantime, they can be downloaded from https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article=?cmd=show&type=NOT&id=1272947.1

Terminology: You say potato, I say potato, and Dan Quail says "potatoe"

There's an unfortunate patch terminology clash between Oracle and Sun patches which you need to be aware of:

  • The Sun term "obsolete" equates to the Oracle term "superseded" - i.e. a patch which is no longer the latest patch is a sequence.
  • The Sun term "withdrawn" equates to the Oracle term "obsolete" - i.e. a patch withdrawn from release due to problems with it.

Since the term "obsolete" is deeply embedded in SVR4 patching, e.g. the variable name SUNW_OBSOLETE in the pkginfo files, it is not possible for us to change it.  Neither is it likely that Oracle will change their terminology as it's well known in DB and Fusion middleware circles.  Users simply need to be aware of this terminology clash when dealing with Oracle Sun SVR4 based patches.

I hope this doesn't become a hot potato. :)

Best Wishes,

Gerry.

Tuesday Jul 13, 2010

Solaris Critical Patch Updates (CPUs)

It's Oracle standard practice to release quarterly Critical Patch Updates (CPUs) containing security fixes.  These scheduled releases enable customers to plan maintenance windows.

Solaris now conforms to this practice and Solaris OS CPUs are now available.

The Solaris OS CPU is an archived snapshot of the Solaris OS Recommended Patch Cluster.

Please note that the Solaris OS bug fixing processes have not changed.  Security and other bugs continue to be fixed as soon as possible, patches containing such fixes for the Solaris OS will continue to be released as quickly as possible, and they will continue to be included in the Recommended Solaris OS Patch Clusters as soon as they become available. 

The Solaris OS CPU simply provides another, archived, patch collation option for customers.

See http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/security/alerts-086861.html and in particular Document 1446032.1 on My Oracle Support (MOS), http://support.oracle.com, which includes CVE mappings for Oracle Sun products. 

Notes:

  1. The CPUs were created on July 6th and released on July 13th.
  2. Solaris 8 is in Vintage support so no patch clusters are updated for Solaris 8.  Instead, the above document lists Solaris 8 patches released in the last quarter which address Security issues.  A Solaris 8 Vintage support contract is needed to access some of them.
Update: CVE to patch mappings are now available for the Solaris CPU from July.  Please see http://blogs.sun.com/security/entry/cpu_july_2010

Thursday May 20, 2010

Merging the Solaris Recommended and Sun Alert Patch Clusters

The Solaris "Recommended" and Sun Alert Patch Clusters have been merged (June 4th 2010). 

The merged clusters are called the "Recommended OS Cluster Solaris <release> <architecture>", for example "Recommended OS Cluster Solaris 10 SPARC". 

The old "Recommended" and Sun Alert Patch Clusters only ever contained Solaris OS patches (with rare exceptions), so we've added "OS" to the new merged cluster name to make this a little clearer.

The merged Recommended OS Clusters have the same access entitlement as the old clusters - namely, you need a support contract which covers Solaris to access them.

The old "Recommended" patch cluster contains the latest revision of Solaris OS patches which fix Sun Alert issues (i.e. Security, Data Corruption, or System Availability issues).  That is, the top-of-tree patches which fix Sun Alert issues.

The Sun Alert patch cluster contains the minimum revision of Solaris OS patches which fix Sun Alert issues.  Thus, the Sun Alert patch cluster provides the minimum amount of change required to get all available Solaris OS fixes for Security, Data Corruption, and System Availability issues.

The contents for the two clusters are very similar, which causes unnecessary confusion as to which one to use.  When the Sun Alert Cluster was released several years ago, it should have replaced the older "Recommended" Cluster, and this merging of the Clusters is to correct that omission.

The inclusion criteria for the Sun Alert cluster is more logically correct, as in the Recommended Cluster there's no more value in adding the latest revision of a patch whose earlier revision provided a fix to a Sun Alert issue than in adding any other random patch.  Many folks assume "latest is greatest", and Oracle Sun wouldn't release a patch unless it is important, but this is slightly simplistic.  Change implies risk, and as many patches address issues which are only seen in very specific configurations, and while Oracle Sun patches are thoroughly tested prior to release, there is little advantage in taking more change than is necessary in minor maintenance windows or reactive patching situations.  Therefore, providing a minimal patch cluster which provides all available fixes for Solaris OS Sun Alert issues for use in minor maintenance windows makes sense.

The old "Recommended" Clusters were often updated several time a week, simply because a later revision of a patch whose earlier revision fixed a Sun Alert issue was released, even though the later revision didn't fix any additional Sun Alert issues.  Since the "Recommended" flag on SunSolve and in the patchdiag.xref metadata file matches the contents of the old "Recommended" Cluster, we were releasing many more patches which were flagged as "Recommended" than customers really needed to apply.

After the merge, new patches added to the Recommended OS Cluster and hence the "Recommended" flag on SunSolve and in the patchdiag.xref metadata file will be the specific revision of patches which address Sun Alert issues.  Only when an obsoleting patch provides a new fix to a Sun Alert issue will it be included and the obsolete patch removed.  The merged Recommended OS Clusters will update on the same cadence as the old Sun Alert clusters, which is typically about once a week for Solaris 10 (5.5 times a month, on average).  We will continue to update the merged Recommended OS Cluster whenever a patch matching the inclusion criteria is released.

To avoid the potential confusion which may be caused if we were to remove the "Recommended" flag from any patches, we will take the "Recommended" Cluster at the beginning of June 2010 as the basis for the merged cluster and then apply the Sun Alert Cluster inclusion criteria going forward.

The merged Recommended OS Cluster was initially released on June 4th, 2010.  The download link (target) file name of the merged cluster will be the same as the old "Recommended" Cluster, e.g. 10_Recommended.zip, to minimize the changes users need to make to automated download scripts.

Customers who have traditionally downloaded the Sun Alert cluster will need to update download scripts to use the merged cluster file download names as the old Sun Alert cluster are no longer available.

In major maintenance windows, the Best Practice recommendation is to upgrade to the latest available Solaris Update release or at least to apply the equivalent Solaris Update Patch Bundle available from the patch cluster download page.  In both cases, the latest Recommended OS Cluster should also be applied as it will contain any additional Solaris OS Security, Data Corruption, and System Availability fixes released since the Solaris Update contents were finalized.  Solaris Updates are intensely tested, and hence this strategy provides a well tested, stable, and feature rich baseline for production systems.  In between major maintenance windows, the Best Practice recommendation is to try to keep as up to date as possible with the contents of the merged Recommended OS Cluster during minor maintenance windows.

Let's look at an example, to make the rationale for the change clearer: 

In the old model, if a security vulnerability in /usr/bin/ls is fixed in patch 123456-03, then both the old Recommended and Sun Alert clusters will initially include it.  If code interdependencies caused by subsequent code putbacks - e.g. the major Trusted Solaris Extensions feature - result in the contents of the "/usr/bin/ls" patch 123456-07 being accumulated into a feature Kernel patch associated with a Solaris 10 Update, e.g. 234567-14, then the old "Recommended" Cluster would include 234567-14 instead of 123456-03, even if 234567-14 contained no additional fixes for Sun Alert issues (i.e. Security, Data Corruption, or System Availability issues) compared to 123456-03.  The "Recommended" flag on SunSolve, in patchdiag.xref, and elsewhere would be updated every time a patch revision obsoletes the original patch, even though these later patch revisions contain no additional fixes to Sun Alert issues.  This can lead to customers who try to stay up to date with "Recommended" patches patching more content and potentially more often than is really necessary.  In contrast, 123456-03 would remain in the Sun Alert cluster for as long as no additional fixes for Sun Alert issues are contained in obsoleting patches.

In the new merged Recommended OS patch cluster model, while the starting point will be the old "Recommended" Cluster as of the start of June 2010 (to avoid dropping the "Recommended" from any patches, which might cause confusion), further changes to the cluster will follow the old Sun Alert cluster inclusion criteria - that is, the merged Recommended OS patch cluster contents and corresponding Recommended flag in SunSolve and patchdiag.xref will only be updated if a new patch delivers a new fix for a Sun Alert issue.   This means that only patches which we really recommend will be included in the Recommended OS patch cluster and flagged as Recommended in SunSolve and patchdiag.xref.  Since the rate of change will be less, it'll be easier for customers to see what's really recommended and allow more informed decisions regarding when to apply such patches.

Please note that this change has nothing whatsoever to do with the integration into Oracle.  This is an enhancement I've been looking to do for some time to avoid the confusion caused by having two very similar patch clusters and a corresponding "Recommended" flag which was updated much more frequently than was necessary.

My team has been working with known consumers of the "Recommended" patch flag such as TLP, Ops Center, 'smpatch', Update Manager, SRAS, EIS, and 'pca' to ensure that the transition goes smoothly.  

For example, TLP and 'pca' consume the patchdiag.xref file which up to now typically only contained entries for top-of-tree (latest) patch revisions.  From June 4th 2010, patchdiag.xref will contain whatever revision of a patch is flagged as "Recommended" as well as the top-of-tree patch revision.  Hence, a single base PatchID, e.g. 123456, may have two entries in the file, e.g. 123456-03 marked "R" for Recommended and "O" for Obsolete and 123456-08 which is the latest revision of that patch but which won't carry the "R" flag as it contains no additional Sun Alert fixes over rev-03.  

From my discussion with Martin Paul, author of 'pca', my understanding is that initially, he plans to propagate the "R" flag forward to the latest patch revision in his 'pca' metadata as currently 'pca' only handles the latest revision of patches, but he'll look at some stage in the future to leverage the more precise "Recommended" flag data we'll be providing with this change.

Monday Feb 01, 2010

'wget', 'pca', and TLP users need to accept updated software license

As the software license agreement terms were updated last week upon Sun becoming a wholly owned subsiduary of Oracle, customers who use 'wget' to automate patch downloads from SunSolve will need to login in once to SunSolve and accept the updated software license agreement before they can continue to use 'wget'.   Please note that some popular patch automation tools such as Traffic Light Patching (TLP) and the 3rd party 'pca' tool use 'wget' and hence this notice is applicable to them too.

http://sunsolve.sun.com currently has the following message at the top of the SunSolve home page:

Alert: wget customers ~ Please log into SunSolve to re-accept the new Software License Agreement prior to running any wget scripts. You can also look under "Update Account" and refer to:
Step 5: Register for patch download automation
Check the box to confirm that you read the license and save the changes. Downloads will work as normal at this point.

Friday Jan 29, 2010

Important new features in latest PatchFinder release

Firstly, please allow me to get something off my chest:

HALLELUJAH!!!

It's been a long wait and we're finally there!

I, for one, am tickled pink.

There's likely be a lot of changes for all of us in the coming months, some good, some maybe controversial to some folk, but I passionately believe that Oracle will bring much needed commercial sense which will ensure that Solaris and Sun-Oracle hardware continues to innovate like hell to provide the solutions you, our customers, need.  So strap yourselves in, the fun is about to begin!

But much more than the red Oracle logo has changed on PatchFinder today.

I want to let you know about two key new features which I believe significantly improve our customers' patch searching experience:

Search for Patches which deliver New Security Fixes 

The PatchFinder "Security Filter" now differentiates between patches which introduce a new security fix (shown by the "NS" symbol in search returns) and patches which simply deliver any security fix, either new or pre-existing (shown by the "S" symbol in search returns). 

Up until now only the latter was available, which made it difficult for customers to differentiate between patch revisions which deliver new security fixes and patch revisions which simply re-deliver old security fixes.

The "New Security Fix" search option under "Security Filter" should typically be used in combination with the "Show Obsolete" option so that you can see all patch revisions delivering new security fixes.  Otherwise you'll just see the subset of patches which are contain both new security fixes and are not obsoleted.

Solaris OS Patches which deliver (or redeliver) security fixes will continue to be added to the "Recommended" Patch Clusters as before, along with OS patches which deliver (or redeliver) Data Corruption or System Availability fixes, the latest patch utility patches, and any other patches required by the above.

Solaris OS Patches which deliver new security fixes will continue to be be added to the Sun Alert Patch Clusters as before, along with OS patches which deliver new Data Corruption or System Availability fixes, the latest patch utility patches, and any other patches required by the above.

But with this New Security Fix option in PatchFinder, you can now find all (6-2 digit PatchID) patches for all products which deliver new security fixes, not just Solaris OS patches.

BTW: This "New Security Fix" feature has actually been in PatchFinder since the last release in December, but this is the first opportunity I've had to blog about it.

Search for patches by the objects they deliver

You can now search for patches by the objects they deliver. 

For example, type "/usr/bin/vi" into the "File Included" search box, filter the search using the other search options if desired ( e.g. select "Solaris 10" under "OS Release" ), and PatchFinder will return the patches which deliver "/usr/bin/vi".  

This is useful if you are having problems with a particular utility or object and want to find if any patches are available for it.  Then reading the CR synopses listed in the README for the appropriate patches returned may help you figure out if the patch is likely to address the problem you are experiencing.

Try searching for "zoneadmd", or "genunix", for example.

Remember, if you enter something like "vi" or "ls" in the "File Included" search box, you'll get all objects which contain those strings in their pathnames, so a well qualified search such as "/usr/bin/vi" or "/usr/bin/ls" may be more useful.

Watch out for symlinks, e.g. on Solaris 10:

$ whence patchadd/usr/sbin/patchadd
/usr/sbin/patchadd
$ ls -l /usr/sbin/patchadd
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root          16 May 15  2009 /usr/sbin/patchadd -> ../lib/patch/pdo\*
So on Solaris 10, search for "/usr/lib/patch" rather than "/usr/sbin/patchadd" to find patch utility patches.  FYI, 'pdo' is the preprocessor to 'patchadd' on Solaris 10 and both are contained in /usr/lib/patch.  Alternatively, just search for "patchadd".

I hope you find these new PatchFinder features useful.   A lot of work went in behind the scenes, especially on ensuring the accuracy of the "New Security Fix" flag.  I'd like to thank my colleagues, Brian, Julien, Slim, Mark, Don, and the rest of the team for making these enhancements a reality.  Nice work guys!

Tuesday Dec 15, 2009

Veritas now supports Solaris Live Upgrade

As I've mentioned in a previous posting, Veritas now supports Solaris Live Upgrade.   Please see here for details.

About

This blog is to inform customers about patching best practice, feature enhancements, and key issues. The views expressed on this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle. The Documents contained within this site may include statements about Oracle's product development plans. Many factors can materially affect these plans and the nature and timing of future product releases. Accordingly, this Information is provided to you solely for information only, is not a commitment to deliver any material code, or functionality, and SHOULD NOT BE RELIED UPON IN MAKING PURCHASING DECISIONS. The development, release, and timing of any features or functionality described remains at the sole discretion of Oracle. THIS INFORMATION MAY NOT BE INCORPORATED INTO ANY CONTRACTUAL AGREEMENT WITH ORACLE OR ITS SUBSIDIARIES OR AFFILIATES. ORACLE SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY WITH RESPECT TO THIS INFORMATION. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Gerry Haskins, Director, Software Lifecycle Engineer

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