Policy Attachment - GPA vs LPA - Best Practice - Part#1 - 11g

In a previous post I briefly mentioned about the fact that in OWSM 11g - we support Global Policy Attachments (GPA) and Local Policy Attachments (LPA) or sometimes also referred to as Direct Policy Attachments (DPA). In this post - I will provide some best practice guidelines on when to use GPA vs. LPA.

For those who are not familiar - in the case of LPA you attach it to a WSDL Port - so the policy applies to WSDL Port. GPA allows you to attach a policy to more coarse grained entities - ex: it can be to a Weblogic Domain - in which case the policy applies to all WSDL Ports running in that weblogic domain. Or the policy can be attached to an application - in which case the policy applies to all WSDL Ports that are part of that application (ex: ear). etc...

So the first main difference b/w GPA and LPA is the granularity. So when would one use GPA? Basically two scenarios:

a) You want a "Secure by Default" story

b) Ease of management for large deployments.

Secure by Default

So what do I mean by "Secure by Default"? Let's say you develop a web service in your favorite IDE. You can secure it at Design Time. However let's say you decide not to secure it at design time. Now the app is deployed - this app is not secure unless somebody goes and secures it post deployment in EM or via WLST. If there are no strict controls and processes in place - that ensures that app is secured before it is made available to the outside world - then you have a potential for vulnerability in that the app is running unsecured.

Improved manageability

Let's say you have a large deployment - 100's of web services - lots of WLS servers, multiple weblogic domains, etc. In this case going and securing each of the 100's of web services can be tedious, time-consuming, and error prone - especially if you want to ensure there are no web services that are unsecured. In such cases, if you have standardized on the security posture of your web services - GPA can be a life saver!.

You can define a GPA that says "all web services (WSDL Port) in all domains" in your deployment use let's say wss11_username_token_with_message_protection_service_policy!

Now whenever a new app is deployed to one of the domains in your deployment - it will "automatically inherit" the oracle/wss11_username_token_with_message_protection_service_policy and you don't have to go into individual web service and secure it. Let's say a year from now - you decide to change the default security posture to say all oracle/wss11_x509_token_with_message_protection_service_policy - then all you need to do is change it your GPA definition - in one place and all the web services in your deployment will be secured with this new policy!

When should you not use GPA?

  1. if you have not standardized on a security postured for your web services - then GPA is not very useful!
  2. Using GPA for role based authorization policies is not very useful. Typically different web services will be accessible by different roles. (Note: It would be ok to use GPA for permission based authorization policies).
  3. If your policy has app specific aspects - then GPA is not appropriate.
    • If you want specific parts of the message to be signed or encrypted as discussed in this post
  4. If a policy has expectations around how code is written by developers then GPA is not appropriate.
    • Ex: Using GPA for MTOM or WS-RM may not be appropriate. Not all web services support attachments - especially MTOM attachments. Also in many cases WS-RM or MTOM may require some coding considerations by developers.
Here are some pointers to the OWSM documentation on GPA and LPA.

GPA: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E21764_01/web.1111/b32511/policy_sets.htm#BABGJCED

LPA: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/E21764_01/web.1111/b32511/attaching.htm#CEGDGIHD

Note: The documentation uses the terminology PolicySet for GPA. PolicySet is the underlying implementation model for supporting Global Policy Attachments!

GPA is extremely powerful - but you need to really understand the pros & cons before you decide to use this feature. In future posts - I will discuss:

a) some of the inheritance rules, etc associated with GPA and also what happens when you have GPA and LPA in a deployment or what happens when you want to mix policies from different categories - ex: Security and WS-RM.

b) When to combine different granualrities

c) Life-cycle aspects of GPA and how it differs from LPA.

Comments:

Post a Comment:
  • HTML Syntax: NOT allowed
About

In this blog I will discuss mainly features supported by Oracle Web Service Manager (OWSM).

Search

Categories
Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today