Tuesday Mar 31, 2015

OUM Spotlight - Keeping Stakeholders Engaged

Congratulations! Your new project is off to a great start and all of the stakeholders came away from the project kickoff meeting informed and enthused. Now you may be wondering how do I keep these very busy stakeholders informed and enthused as the project moves along?  One technique used by successful OUM projects is to communicate the project's status to all of the stakeholders upon the completion of the phase end milestones, and take this milestone opportunity to inform these stakeholders of upcoming critical events and decisions. This practice connects stakeholders into the flow of the project, thus promoting collaborative working relationships and reducing risk by continually demonstrating project progress and driving decision making.

Another widely used technique is to demonstrate configurations and extensions to ambassador users at key points in the development cycle. This gives ambassador users the ability to conduct testing throughout the project, which facilitates a smooth UAT and mitigates any potential surprises at the end of the project.

Have any tips and techniques on keeping stakeholders engaged on your projects?  Please share in the comments.

Saturday Oct 11, 2014

Questions to Ask When Organizing Your OUM Workplan

So you’ve read all the tips and blogs about how to tailor OUM for your project and you’ve figured out what tasks you need. Now you have to put them into a workplan. What do you do? Do you use the traditional activity wbs structure highlighted in the method or do you need something else? The possibilities are endless. Think about how you implement your projects now. Think about what works now and what doesn’t. Consider this blog my Questions to Ask When Organizing Your OUM Workplan.

  1. Does the traditional OUM activity-work-breakdown structure fit my project?
  2. Does your project involve more than one custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) product? If so, maybe you want to do this work in partitions. Determine which activities/tasks should be duplicated into each partition.
  3. Do you need to consider copying sections of your workplan and putting them into iterations for accommodating use case packages?
  4. Can certain processes be run as “mini projects?” Some processes can almost be run as a side project on their own, for example, Technical Architecture (TA), Performance Management (PT), Documentation (DO), Training (TR), and Organizational Change Management (OCM). If so, it may make more sense to group and track these tasks under a process/activity heading and not space them out into the various phases.
  5. Do you use one workplan or a master workplan with individual plans that report or roll up into the master? This might work if you have Team Leaders that manage specific pieces of work. Use a placeholder activity/task in the master workplan and the detail can be managed in a sub workplan.

The bottom line is, be creative. Build your workplan(s) to suit your project. As you start another project, don’t be afraid to change something that isn’t working. Finally, share your workplans and experiences.

Wednesday Sep 24, 2014

Checklists Are Leading Edge

I recently ran across this blog on The Power of Checklists by Ivar Jacobson. In it he describes the value of using checklists on software projects since they: “keep software projects on track, and help maximize the delivery of value, and minimize the risk of project failure.” OUM practitioners know this since the method contains checklists in many places - templates, phase overviews, activities, tasks, etc.  In fact, the WBS itself could be considered a checklist since the activities and tasks are merely “placeholders for work.”

The OUM checklists which I find particularly valuable are the Activity Checklists found in each of the Lifecycle Milestone Summaries. These checklists are designed to assist you with the determining “completeness” of the project at that point. They also contain lists of key decisions and common risks that should be addressed during that particular phase of the project – kind of like a “you are here” checkpoint for the project's progress.

I think Ivar would agree with me about the value of the OUM Activity Checklists since he is a fan of Barry Boehm’s standard project milestones. You can read more about Barry Boehm’s standard project milestones in his seminal work – “Anchoring the Software Process” [Barry Boehm, November 1995].

Which OUM checklists do you find to be of the most value? Please share your opinion in the comments.

Wednesday Aug 06, 2014

Guard Against the Multitasking Brain Drain with OUM

Most people are aware of the perils of multitasking – it is bad for productivity, increases the possibility of distractions, and basically creates a mental traffic jam. It not only wreaks havoc in everyday life but also causes major problems on projects. If you look at OUM you might be thinking, “Hey wait! Isn’t the fact that OUM’s processes run in parallel and that it takes a cross-functional approach really multitasking?” My response to you (to borrow from Lee Corso) is, “Not So Fast, My Friend!”

The answer is directly related to magnitude of the shifts in focus. We know that those broad deviations in requirements and technology require more adjustment and time to switch gears. Human brains are okay with shifting tasks within reasonable limits. On a well managed OUM project, the team is focused on a discrete, prioritized list of functionality and technology. Only a limited number of logically grouped requirements are being worked at a time in order to achieve specific milestones. This means there is a narrow span of scope being addressed at any point in the project, even there may be a wide range of tasks and processes in play.

Extensive detours such as new requirements and major shifts in priorities are the catalysts that can lose the project to the nemesis known as multitasking. Fortunately, OUM has a number of tools to keep the focus and guard against the multitasking brain drain – timeboxes, MoSCoW lists, use cases, and system context diagrams...just to name a few.

What are some tools you use to keep your projects focused? Please share with us in the comments section below!

Monday Jul 14, 2014

Eleven Questions to Ask When Tailoring OUM for Your Project

I’ve posted several blogs in the past on tailoring OUM. Here’s one more. As you can see from the title, I call this one Eleven Questions to Ask When Tailoring OUM for Your Project. 

Start with the Core Workflow and adjust it based on the following questions.

  1. Do you need additional Business Requirements (RD) and Requirements Analysis (RA) tasks?  If so, add them.
  2. Are you implementing a custom-off-the-shelf (COTS) product?  If yes, review the Mapping and Configuration (MC) process and add any tasks not already included in the Core Workflow.  If no, remove the Configuration Sub-Flow tasks.
  3. Is there custom work?  If yes, add additional Analysis (AN), Design (DS), Implementation (IM) and Testing (TE) tasks, as appropriate.  If no, you may be able to remove the tasks in the Custom Development Sub-Flow.
  4. What are the Technical Architecture (TA) requirements?  Add TA tasks as appropriate.
  5. Will there be any data conversion?  Add any Data Acquisition and Conversion (CV) tasks as appropriate.
  6. Are there any Performance Management (PT) requirements?  Add PT tasks as appropriate.
  7. What are the Documentation (DO) requirements?  Add DO tasks as appropriate.
  8. What are the Organizational Change Management (OCM) requirements?  Add OCM tasks as appropriate.
  9. What are the Training (TR) requirements?  Add TR tasks as appropriate.
  10. What are the Transition (TS) requirements?  Add TS tasks as appropriate.
  11. What are the Operations and Support (PS) requirements?  Add PS tasks as appropriate.

Now that you’ve identified all the tasks you need, consider how you want to approach your project.  Can you use the traditional OUM WBS approach or do you need to configure your workplan a little differently.  The possibilities are endless, but that’s a discussion for my next blog.

Monday Jun 16, 2014

OUM Success Story: Multi-Product Implementation for a Leading Travel and Transportation Client

More success! Or in honor of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil we should say: "¡GOL!"  As follow-on to my previous blog entry on the OUM Success Quote, here we have an example of how OUM was used successfully on a highly complex, multi-product project.

Project Profile:  A leading Travel and Transportation Company increased customer satisfaction and streamlined accounting functions through an implementation of Oracle E-Business Suite, Oracle Business Intelligence Applications, and Hyperion Solution. 

Use of OUM provided significant value to the project by providing the framework to establish an Integrated Project Plan: Using the same phasing and terminology on the overall project workplan for the separate E-Business Suite, OBI EE / OBIA, and Hyperion project partitions, enabled the project to leverage an Iterative and Incremental approach while enabling a complete view of the major milestones and touch points between the different partitions.

One aspect of particular significance is that this project utilized the technique of partitioning the project plan so that the work was divided into more manageable pieces. When dealing with large and/or complex projects it is advisable to split the functionality that is targeted to be implemented into smaller bits of effort.  We call these partitions in OUM, but they can also referred to as workstreams, subsystems, pillars, etc..  No matter what they are called, the whole idea is to logically break up the work, while still allowing for a common approach and integration of the tasks at key points in the project.  As you can see, the result on this project was a successful implementation and a very satisfied client.  

Do you have an OUM project success you would like to share?  Please let us know in the comments. 

Monday Apr 28, 2014

Where’s My View?

With release 6.1 and continued with 6.2, the Home page access pull down was renamed from Select a View to Access Method By and the options were changed.  The view access is still available, but now you also can access applicable OUM content by role (Project Manager or Team Member) or by Supplemental Guidance (Solution Delivery Guide or Supplemental Guide) or by Method Repository.  So let’s talk about each of these options as well as review the View option.

By Role

Access is defined for two roles; Project Manager and Team Member.

The OUM for Project Managers access page provides quick links into OUM content that is applicable to Project Managers.  This includes the Manage views, the templates, and valuable resources such as Planning a Project using OUM and Tailoring OUM for your Project.

The OUM for Team Members access page provides quick links for all other roles.  This includes the Method Repository, the templates, examples, mappings and techniques.

By Supplemental Guidance

Supplemental Guidance access is by Solution Delivery Guide or Supplemental Guide.  Selecting either of these takes you to the appropriate section of the Supplemental Guide Index.  This access selection enables you to go straight to the supplemental guidance that best fits your immediate needs.  Choose Solution Delivery Guide to access the Cloud Application Services Implementation Approach Solution Delivery Guide.  OUM contains a good number of Supplemental Guides.  The guides are presented in alphabetical order. 

By Method Repository

The Method Repository section of the Access Method By pull down provides access to the core OUM process overviews, task overviews and templates for each focus area.

By View

If you are familiar with previous releases of OUM and you want to know what happened to your view, start with the ==VIEW== section of the Access Method By pull down.  This section is organized as follows, Manage, Envision, Implement, Business Process Management (BPM), Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and Full Method.  Selecting the ==VIEW==, Manage, Envision, Implement or Full Method takes you to the appropriate section of the View Catalog.  Once in the View Catalog, choose your view.  Selecting Business Process Management (BPM) or Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) takes you to the associated landing page and you can then choose your view.

Wednesday Mar 19, 2014

Scrum Teams -- Do you feel the rhythm?

Hi, I’m Terri Merenkov a member of the Global Methods team at Oracle. This month I celebrate my 18th year with Oracle. You might be surprised by that, but many in the Global Methods team have more tenure than I do. This is part of what makes my job so interesting. If I don’t know the answer to something about Oracle Implementation projects of a certain type, I don’t have to go far to find someone who does. Even though some concepts have been around for a while, there is always something new coming so we are constantly adapting and changing.

We have many things to learn about, today, even though they may have been around for a while, for example Scrum. Scrum was created in 1993 by Jeff Sutherland. The term “scrum” is borrowed from an analogy used in the 1986 study by Takeuchi and Nonaka (Takeuchi), published in the Harvard Business Review. In the study, the authors equated high-performance, cross-functional teams to the packs formed by Rugby teams.

Here we are nearly two decades later actually applying Scrum in our software development projects. Yet some people think that Scrum is new,maybe it is coming into the mainstream perhaps because we realize that often taking something large and breaking it down helps support a successful software implementation.  It is only now that we're seeing teams celebrate success using Scrum.  Of course, not everyone is successful. Scrum seems so simple, it's often the human factor that really determines how well things go.

In the 80’s I was very into music, I started in University as a music education major. My major was percussion as well as piano, with a minor in French. At the time, I had no idea what a computer was, however, I was playing electric keyboards “synthesizers” with built-in percussion instruments of course I was enamored with the Mellotron and Moog synthesizers that were being used by some of the progressive rock bands. Once I discovered that music was being cut from the curriculum of many schools, I decided to re-think my major. A software “recruiter” lived across the street from me. She suggested that I try taking some computer courses, since often people who are good at music and language happen to excel in using computers. I began taking classes in computer science, and the more I learned, the more I wanted to know!

I find it interesting at this point in my life, I’m being reminded of good things that I learned about when I was younger, that are actually useful in my adult life – today.

Just the other day, I was working on some updates to the Scrum View in OUM and I came across the word “Cadence”. Oh, I thought, I know about Cadence! Any good drummer knows that a cadence is needed to get the marching band to stay in step when marching across the football field or in a parade.  Of course the percussionists are experts in various percussion instruments,

The percussionists in a marching band have a natural rhythm, in fact when the band is marching in between songs, the percussionists are keeping a cadence that allows everyone to step together, as part of a group, each individual takes nice even steps until we’re in place to play the next song.  This rhythm can me a steady tapping on the drum "rims" or use of the full percussion instrument.

So think about a Scrum team, just the way you would think about a group of musicians in a band. Good Scrum teams “feel the rhythm” they have a cadence that allows the team to work together easily, almost naturally. With each Sprint retrospective, they examine what worked and what didn’t. Over the course of several Sprints, a true cadence is achieved by the team. A sustainable team cadence leads us to another term used in the Scrum approach; velocity.

When I think of velocity, I think of speed, but in a software development effort, speed isn’t always our main focus. In Scrum, velocity is obtained by calculating the number of units of work that can be completed by the team during a specific timeframe (Sprint). Velocity refers to the speed at which a team can implement and test use cases (user stories) and change requests (that is, how much of the product backlog the team can complete). This is reflected in the Burndown Charts by showing the progress made so far versus the planned/estimated progress. Of course with each Scrum Sprint, the team becomes more experienced, and can determine velocity based on how many units of work they have completed during previous Sprints.

 

Contrary to what some may say, even though Scrum uses the word Sprint, we aren’t necessarily only focused on going as fast as we can until we burn out the team. Rather, we work on building teams that can develop, test and integrate working software in a collaborative, yet agile fashion.  This results in a sustained rhythm. So I ask you - can YOU feel the rhythm? What experiences have you had in building expert teams that work well together?  Have you used Scrum successfully and why?  Listen... do you feel it?

Monday Apr 22, 2013

Tailoring the OUM Workplan

Did you know that OUM has guidance for tailoring your project?

Located in the Supplemental Guidance section of the Key Components on the Manage view is the Tailoring OUM for Your Project guidance.  This guidance describes a step-by-step process for tailoring OUM for your project.  This process starts with the Estimate and/or Proposal and ends with Assigning Resources and Duration to Activities and Tasks. 

What this blog focuses on is the tailoring of the actual OUM Project Workplan for your project for activities and tasks (tailoring steps 2.0 through 5.2) including tips for applying a bottom-up as well as a top-down technique for tailoring the Project Workplan.  So let’s get started.

For our example, we are starting with the OUM Project Workplan that is located in the Method Resources section of the Key Components of most view pages. In OUM 5.6, a new Project Workplan template was introduced with pre-tailoring capability for most Implement views.  Our example project also is most closely aligned with the Requirements-Driven Application Implementation view.

To develop our Project Workplan, we have several options.  We can employ a top-down approach and start with all of OUM and tailor it down.  We can employ a bottom-up approach and start with the Core Workflow and build up from there.  The best approach is probably to start with the workplan that most closely matches our engagement and tailor up and down.  That is, immediately tailor down to a pre-tailored Workplan and continue to tailor from there based on the requirements of the engagement, while simultaneously keeping in mind the Core Workflow and building up from there.

So for our example, we are starting with the Requirements-Driven Application Implementation pre-tailored OUM Project Workplan.

Our next step is to eliminate activities/tasks that are not needed. Consider the following:
  1. Don’t eliminate anything in the Core Workflow without carefully consideration.
  2. Review any available supplemental guidance.
  3. Consider removing activities/tasks NOT included in the Estimate and/or Proposal.
  4. Determine if it’s possible to eliminate all if not most of some processes. For example, consider removing the following processes and corresponding activities and/or tasks, if your project does not include ANY requirements for them:
  • Performance Management
  • Organizational Change Management
  • Training
  • Data Acquisition and Conversion
Now that we have tailored down, we should consider if we need to add any activities/tasks.  These include two types of activities/tasks:
  • Activities/Tasks that were excluded from the Requirements-Driven Application Implementation pre-tailored Project Workplan, and
  • Project-Specific (Custom) Activities/Tasks

For the excluded activities/tasks, use the 01_OUM_Set_Project_Filter view of the OUM Project Workplan to review any activities/tasks that were not included in the Requirements-Driven Application Implementation pre-tailored OUM Project Workplan and determine if they are needed for the engagement.

Project-specific custom activities/tasks are activities/tasks that are not already included in OUM. Add these to the Project Workplan.

Now we have a tailored OUM Project Workplan for our engagement.  However, we still need to apply partitioning, if applicable, and iteration planning.  This however is a topic for another blog.  In the meantime, I encourage you to peruse the following OUM guidance:

From the Manage view, Key Components, Supplemental Guidance:

  • Planning a Project using OUM
  • Tailoring OUM for Your Project

Form the Manage view, Key Components, Method Resources

  • OUM Project Workplan – This link accesses the Project Workplan page which allows you to download a zipped file containing the Project Workplan and the Project Workplan User’s Guide.

Finally, you might also want to review the Task Overviews for WM.010 (Develop Baseline Project Workplan) and WM.030 (Manage Project Workplan).

Wednesday Jan 30, 2013

A Method Store – Supplemental Guidance (Understanding the Structure of OUM)

My last blog in this series on understanding the structure of OUM discusses supplemental guidance.  This is the final section of the OUM Repository “store” that you need to consider.

Going back to our grocery store comparison, the grocery store contains additional specialty items.  These items complement the groceries.  You don’t always need these items, but sometimes they come in handy.  These items might include sections for gourmet or hard to find groceries, a book section with cookbooks or a section with small kitchen appliances and utensils.  While you don’t need these items all the time, different items may be useful for different recipes or occasions.

OUM has supplemental guidance that complements the base method materials.  This is additional supplemental inventory that might be useful for your project.  Just as you narrowed down the base method materials based on your type of project, you can also narrow down the supplemental guidance based on your type of project.

If you have decided to use a particular view, applicable supplemental guidance can be found in the Key Components section at the top of the view.  The first column contains view-specific supplemental guidance.  For example, if your project is a Requirements-Driven Application Implementation, this view includes links to the Application Implementation Overview and Supplemental Guide.  

Additional supplemental guidance is found in the second column of the Key Components.  This can be anything from additional supplemental guides, such as Oracle Support Services, to additional resource links.  The last link in this column is to the OUM Supplemental Guidance page that provides an Index to ALL supplemental guidance in OUM

The final column in the Key Components section of the view is to method resources.  This includes the OUM Project Workplan, Key Work Products and the OUM mappings.

Review the resources found in the Key Components section of your selected view or go straight to the Supplemental Guidance page from the Method Navigation pull-down menu of any view in OUM and see what additional guidance is available in OUM and if it is useful for your current project.

Monday Jan 28, 2013

A Method Store – Views (Understanding the Structure of OUM)

This is the fourth blog in a series of blogs on the structure of OUM.  In the previous blogs, I compared the OUM repository to a grocery store or a store with method materials with three main departments (focus areas); Manage, Envision and Implement and each of these having sections for phases, processes, activities and tasks.

So now you have your project and you know you don’t need to use everything in OUM but with all this material, where do you start?

Start with a view, or a pre-populated shopping list that provides access to the method materials (or inventory) for a particular type of project, for example, Application Implementation, Software Upgrade, etc.  The OUM views have been determined with the help of experienced subject matter experts (SMEs).

Views can be selected from the OUM Home page using the Select a View pull-down menu.  Alternatively, you can use the Resources button on the Home page to go to the Resources page and from there open the View Catalog.  The View Catalog describes each of the views supported in the current release of OUM.

Each view is organized similarly to the original focus area views.  If applicable, there will be Guidelines sections for each focus area that allow you to access the phases and processes.  At the bottom will be a filtered list of Tasks and Work Products.

Start with the view that most closely matches your project and then tailor it for your project requirements.  You can even start with the OUM Implement Core Workflow and add additional method components based on your project requirements.

My next and last blog in this series will discuss OUM Supplemental Guidance.

Friday Jan 25, 2013

A Method Store – Base Materials (Understanding the Structure of OUM)

Once again, building on my previous blogs where I compared the OUM repository to a grocery store or basically a store with method materials with three main sections (focus areas); Manage, Envision and Implement.

Each focus area is organized similarly.  Within each focus area of the OUM repository, there are sections (or departments) for phases, processes, activities and tasks.

Phase guidance is found in the Phase Overviews.  Phases are a chronological grouping of tasks.  In OUM, services are delivered by phase in order to reduce project risk.  Each phase allows a checkpoint against project goals, and measurement against quality criteria.  Phases are temporal groupings, that is, they are bound by time.  They cut vertically through project activities and provide natural points for establishing project milestones for progress checkpoints.

Process guidance is found in the Process Overviews.  A process is a discipline or subproject that defines a set of tasks related by subject matter, required skills and common dependencies.  A process usually spans several phases.

Activity guidance is found in the Activity Overviews.  An Activity is a set of tasks related either by topic, dependencies, data, common skills/roles, or work products. The tasks in an activity may come from different processes.  Activities in OUM begin and end in the same method phase.  Activities are spread within the project phases according to the time and ordering where they logically occur during the life of the project.

Task guidance is found in the Task Overviews.  A task is a unit of work that is done as part of a project and results in a new or revised work product.  A task is the smallest traceable item on a project workplan, and forms the basis for a work breakdown structure.  A work product is simply the output of a task.  Many OUM tasks have work product templates.

Once again go to the Select a View menu on the OUM Home page and select “Full Method and Focus Areas”.  From this page, choose the focus view.  Once in any of the focus area view pages, expand the Guidelines window or choose it from the Current Page Navigation menu.  From within this window, you can access the focus area phases and processes.  You can access the tasks and their associated work products by expanding the appropriate Tasks and Work Products sections at the bottom of each focus area view.

Okay now that you know how the base method materials are organized in the OUM repository, my next blog will discuss the OUM views, or your pre-populated shopping lists.

Friday Jan 18, 2013

A Method Store - Focus Areas (Understanding the Structure of OUM)

If you remember my previous blog entry, I compared the OUM repository to a grocery store, that is, a store with method materials.  Just as the grocery store is organized into sections or departments, the OUM repository is segmented into three main sections or focus areas; Manage, Envision and Implement.  

Each of these focus areas has its own view.  From the OUM Home page, use the Select a View menu to go to the Full Method and Focus Areas page.  From there choose the focus area view.

The focus areas provide the framework for all the other method materials. Specifically, the Manage focus area provides the framework for program and project management.  The Envision focus area provides the framework for enterprise-level planning and the Implement focus area provides the framework for project implementation.  In OUM, focus area guidance is found in the Focus Area Overviews.

So, if you are making your shopping list for your project, ask yourself the following questions:
  • Do I need project management for my project?  In most cases, you always need project management and therefore, should consider the Manage focus area.
  • Is my project an enterprise-level planning project?  If so, consider the Envision focus area.
  • Am I implementing a COTS product, or doing a BI/EPM, WebCenter or custom project?  If so, consider the Implement focus area.
Once you know what focus area(s) you need, use the Select a View menu on the OUM Home page and select “Full Method and Focus Areas”.  From this page, choose the focus view.  Once in the view page, you can access the method materials available within each focus area, which is the topic for my next blog.

Thursday Jan 17, 2013

A Method Store (Understanding the Structure of OUM) - Introduction

This blog entry is the first in a series of blog entries to assist you in understanding the structure of the Oracle Unified Method.

The Oracle Unified Method (OUM) is a repository of information that can be used to support the entire enterprise IT lifecycle, including support for the successful implementation of every Oracle product.

Think of OUM as a grocery store filled with inventory (method materials) that can be used to implement your project.  When you shop, you never select everything in the grocery store.  You pick and choose what inventory is appropriate based on your grocery needs.  The same is true for the OUM repository.  You pick and choose the method materials appropriate for your project

When you shop at the grocery store, you have some idea of the inventory and how it is organized.  Even if you have never been in a grocery store, you know that the inventory is organized by sections or departments, such as, a bakery, and departments for meat, produce, dairy, canned goods, etc.  

The OUM repository or “store” contains a comprehensive set of method materials to support your projects.  These materials are organized as well.  The OUM inventory is organized by focus areas, phases, processes, activities, tasks, and work products.

Last, when you shop at the grocery store, you usually have a shopping list of what you need.  This list is based on experience, habit and planning.  

OUM has views, or pre-populated shopping lists that provide access to the method materials (or inventory) for particular types of projects, for example, Application Implementations, Software Upgrades, etc.

Now that we have been briefly introduced to the OUM repository and what it contains, my next few blogs will discuss how the OUM repository or “store” is organized.

Tuesday Jan 08, 2013

What's New in OUM 5.6: Updated Manage Homepage

Have you seen the updated Manage Focus Area homepage in the latest release of OUM?  If you have downloaded the recently released OUM 5.6, you may have noticed the Manage homepage was redesigned so that the primary navigation is now by activity, rather than by process as in prior releases. This was done based on feedback from our global PM community that they prefer to view and manage their projects at the activity level. The new activity diagram navigation allows a PM to see the major blocks of work that must be accomplished by phase. This enhancement provides a flexible checklist and high-level perspective preferred by many OUM project management practitioners.

If you still want to navigate through Manage via the process view (aka the Whale Diagram), you still can. Go to the bottom of the ‘Select a View’ list from the OUM homepage and select ‘Full Method and Focus Areas’. On this page, you can then select the both the primary Manage view or the Manage Process view.

Haven’t downloaded OUM 5.6 yet? Check out the official announcement for more information about how you can download the method pack and start taking advantage of the updates in OUM 5.6. In the meantime, your comments and feedback are very welcome.

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