Monday Mar 11, 2013

OUM’s Oracle Support Services Supplemental Guide – What’s in it for you?

As highlighted in this previous post, the Oracle® Unified Method (OUM) includes supplemental guides to provide product, technology, and business area specific guidance, which complement and expand on the general guidance found in OUM’s baseline method materials.

There are a number of Supplemental Guides currently available in OUM covering a variety of areas from Commercial Off-the-Shelf (COTS) Application Implementations to WebCenter.  Because they provide targeted guidance, most supplemental guides are applicable only to projects that include the subject area being addressed in that guide.  However, there is one supplemental guide, which is applicable to virtually all projects – the Oracle Support Services Supplemental Guide.

The Oracle Support Services Supplemental Guide provides OUM practitioners, and Oracle customers alike, with the guidance needed to effectively manage and support the lifecycle of Oracle environments during an implementation and after go-live.

So, what’s in this guide for you?  Well, in a word, plenty.  Like all of OUM’s supplemental guides, the Oracle Support Services Supplemental Guide is comprised of several sections, including:

  • Oracle Support Services Lifecycle Management Strategy Overview
  • Oracle Support Services Lifecycle Management Methodology Mapping
  • Supplemental Task Guidelines for Lifecycle Management of the My Oracle Support Services Portal, and
  • Supplemental Task Guidelines for IT Change Management

 

The Oracle Support Services Lifecycle Management Strategy Overview section describes the lifecycle management strategy along with an overview of the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) Service Lifecycle upon which it is based. 

The Oracle Support Services Lifecycle Management Methodology Mapping provides a mapping between the OUM and ITIL lifecycle management methodologies.  This mapping should be used to gain an understanding of the relationship between OUM and ITIL, as well as how to leverage the value of the ITIL best practices to achieve excellence in the lifecycle management of any Oracle investment.

The Supplemental Task Guidelines for Lifecycle Management of the My Oracle Support Services Portal should be used in conjunction with the standard OUM task guidelines to supplement baseline guidance for affected tasks when planning and implementing the processes, policies and procedures used for lifecycle management of the My Oracle Support Services portal.  This section contains very helpful guidance regarding the recommended configuration of client environments, and establishment of best practices, to take full advantage of the My Oracle Support Services portal.

The Supplemental Task Guidelines for IT Change Management likewise should be used in conjunction with the standard OUM task guidelines to supplement baseline guidance for affected tasks when planning and implementing the processes, policies and procedures used for implementing changes in Oracle environments.

Accessing the Oracle Support Services Supplemental Guide is fast and easy.  A link to the guide can be found in the Key Components area of nearly all Implement Focus Area Views – look for it in the “Other Supplemental Guidance” section in the middle of the screen.  Alternatively, you can access it by selecting the “Supplemental Guidance” option in the Method Navigation drop down menu from any OUM page.  On the Supplemental Guidance page you’ll find it listed in the table of Supplemental Guides, which are listed in alphabetical order.

Take the time to check it out and revisit with each new release, since new sections are being added over time.  I think you’ll find the information very helpful!

Thursday Dec 13, 2012

Do You Know How OUM defines the four, basic types of business system testing performed on a project? Why not test your knowledge?

Testing is perhaps the most important process in the Oracle® Unified Method (OUM). That makes it all the more important for practitioners to have a common understanding of the various types of functional testing referenced in the method, and to use the proper terminology when communicating with each other about testing activities.

OUM identifies four basic types of functional testing, which is sometimes referred to as business system testing.  The basic functional testing types referenced by OUM include:

  1. Unit Testing
  2. Integration Testing
  3. System Testing, and
  4.  Systems Integration Testing

See if you can match the following definitions with the appropriate type above?

A.  This type of functional testing is focused on verifying that interfaces/integration between the system being implemented (i.e. System under Discussion (SuD)) and external systems functions as expected.

B.     This type of functional testing is performed for custom software components only, is typically performed by the developer of the custom software, and is focused on verifying that the several custom components developed to satisfy a given requirement (e.g. screen, program, report, etc.) interact with one another as designed.

C.  This type of functional testing is focused on verifying that the functionality within the system being implemented (i.e. System under Discussion (SuD)), functions as expected.  This includes out-of-the -box functionality delivered with Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) applications, as well as, any custom components developed to address gaps in functionality. 

D.  This type of functional testing is performed for custom software components only, is typically performed by the developer of the custom software, and is focused on verifying that the individual custom components developed to satisfy a given requirement  (e.g. screen, program, report, etc.) functions as designed.

 

Check your answers below:

  1. (D)
  2. (B)
  3. (C)
  4. (A)

If you matched all of the functional testing types to their definitions correctly, then congratulations!  If not, you can find more information in the Testing Process Overview and Testing Task Overviews in the OUM Method Pack.

Tuesday Nov 08, 2011

OUM is Business Process and Use Case-Driven

Business Process and Use Case-Driven

Business processes and use cases are used as the primary artifacts for establishing the desired behavior of the system and for communicating this behavior among the stakeholders.

OUM projects are able to document requirements through business process models, through use cases, and through written supplemental and quality of service requirements. OUM guidance helps implementers to understand where each technique is appropriate and how they fit togehter

Business processes modeling helps stakeholders and implementers to understand the business processes of an organization, and look at the business requirements that are satisfied by a particular business process. To complement business process models, use cases models and use cases may be used to:

  • Provide a consistent mechanism to link system requirements to design and test tasks
  • Bridge the gap between business modeling, business processes, and software system functionality
  • Provide a consistent thread through OUM – use cases help amplify and consolidate the many other benefits of the method
  • Identify implicit or unstated requirements
  • Manage traceability of requirements through testing

Often business process models for predefined solutions exist and contain some form or description of how the user interacts with the system or how a system interacts with another system. Where these business process models already exist, they should be reviewed as a means of gathering business requirements. The need for additional use case modeling would depend on how well the business process models have captured the requirements of the business. Use cases become particularly important where there is a significant gap between the functionality required by the business and the functionality provided by the predefined solution or software product that is being employed. OUM proposes that implementers develop only the set of models and artifacts required to understand and document requirements and trace those requirements through the implementation lifecycle.

As the project progresses and where the need to develop use cases arises, the use cases are analyzed and the system is designed and implemented to meet the requirements captured in the use cases. The implemented components are tested to verify that they provide the business benefit described by the use cases. All of the models (Use Case Model, Analysis Model, Design Model, Architectural Implementation, and Performance Test Transaction Models) are related to each other through trace dependencies. Use cases are prioritized to:

  • Define the architecture before committing too much resource
  • First deliver the components with the highest value to the customer
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