Iterative and Incremental Principle Series 3: The Implementation Plan (a.k.a The Fitness Plan)

Welcome back to the Iterative and Incremental Blog series.  Yesterday, I demonstrated how shorter interval sets allowed me to focus on my fitness goals and achieve success.  Likewise, in a project setting, shorter milestones allow the project team to maintain focus and experience a sense of accomplishment throughout the project lifecycle.  Today, I will discuss project planning and how to effectively plan your iterations.

Admittedly, there is more to applying the iterative and incremental principle than breaking long durations into multiple, shorter ones.  In order to effectively apply the iterative and incremental approach, one should start by creating an implementation plan.  

In a project setting, the Implementation Plan is a high level plan that focuses on milestones, objectives, and the number of iterations.  It is the plan that is typically developed at the start of an engagement identifying the project phases and milestones. 

When the iterative and incremental principle is applied, the Implementation Plan also identified the number of iterations planned for each phase.  The implementation plan does not include the detailed plan for the iterations, as this detail is determined prior to each iteration start during Iteration Planning.  An individual iteration plan is created for each project iteration.

For my fitness regime, I also created an “Implementation Plan” for my weekly exercise.   My high level plan included exercising 6 days a week, and since I cross train, trying not to repeat the same exercise two days in a row.  Because running on the hills outside is the most difficult and consequently, the most effective exercise, my implementation plan includes running outside at least 2 times a week.   Regardless of the exercise selected, I always apply a series of 6-minute interval sets.

 I never plan what I will do each day in advance because there are too many changing factors that need to be considered before that level of detail is determined.  If my Implementation Plan included details on the exercise I was to perform each day of the week, it is quite certain that I would be unable to follow my plan to that level.  It is unrealistic to plan each day of the week without considering the unique circumstances at that time.  For example, what is the weather?  Are there are conflicting schedule commitments?  Are there injuries that need to be considered?  Likewise, in a project setting, it is best to plan for the iteration details prior to its start.

Join me for tomorrow’s blog where I will discuss when and how to plan the details of your iterations.

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