Tuesday Mar 25, 2014

New in OUM - The Abbreviated PMP Template

Did you know that OUM now contains an Abbreviated Project Management Plan (PMP) template in the BT.070 – Create Project Management Framework task?  If you have been around OUM for a while, or have been a project manager using another methodology that aligns to PMI's global standards, you know that the PMP is key to promoting project success. The PMP is the work product that captures the project approaches for all of the OUM Manage processes. The Abbreviated PMP template in OUM is a MS-PowerPoint deck that serves to encapsulate the essential elements of the overall plan into a single presentation.

The Abbreviate PMP is applicable for smaller (<500 day projects is the general recommendation) and/or agile projects which call for lightweight, low-ceremony documentation. It is also well-suited to the PMP index approach where planning documents are written as separate documents and then linked within the master presentation. In any kind of project, it can serve as a scalable presentation which may be used during the project kick-off or other team meetings.

Regardless of which approach you take on your project, the PMP template (or any OUM work product for that matter) should be revised to fit the needs of your project.

Check out the new Abbreviate PMP template and let us know your thoughts.

Wednesday Mar 19, 2014

Oracle Unified Method (OUM) 6.2


Oracle’s Full Lifecycle Method
for Deploying Oracle-Based Business Solutions

About | Release | Access | Previous Announcements


Oracle is evolving the Oracle® Unified Method (OUM) to achieve the vision of supporting the entire Enterprise IT Lifecycle, including support for the successful implementation of every Oracle product. OUM replaces Legacy Methods, such as AIM Advantage, AIM for Business Flows, EMM Advantage, PeopleSoft's Compass, and Siebel's Results Roadmap.

OUM provides an implementation approach that is rapid, broadly adaptive, and business-focused. OUM includes a comprehensive project and program management framework and materials to support Oracle's growing focus on enterprise-level IT strategy, architecture, and governance.


OUM release 6.2 provides support for Application Implementation, Cloud Application Services Implementation, and Software Upgrade projects as well as the complete range of technology projects including Business Intelligence (BI), Enterprise Security, WebCenter, Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), Application Integration Architecture (AIA), Business Process Management (BPM), Enterprise Integration, and Custom Software. Detailed techniques and tool guidance are provided, including a supplemental guide related to Oracle Tutor and UPK.

This release features:

  • OUM Cloud Application Services Implementation Approach Templates
  • Updated/Enhanced:
    • OUM Cloud Application Services Implementation Approach Guidance and Templates fully integrated
    • The Open Group Architecture Framework (TOGAF) View updated to align with TOGAF Version 9.1
    • Scrum View enhanced based on feedback from Subject Matter Experts, including additional Tasks and Technique Guidance
    • Implement Core Workflow refined based on feedback from Subject Matter Experts
    • Manage Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) refined based on feedback from Subject Matter Experts, specifically CMM.060 Submit Final Reports task moved to Close Processes and Contract activity and QM.030 Conduct Project Team Quality Management Orientation task moved to Orient and Manage Team activity
    • OUM Microsoft Project Workplan Template realigned with Manage WBS
    • Compliance with Oracle's Accessibility Guidelines - Phase Two
  • For a comprehensive list of features and enhancements, refer to the "What's New" page of the Method Pack.

Upcoming releases will provide expanded support for Oracle's Enterprise Application suites including product-suite specific materials and guidance for tailoring OUM to support various engagement types.


Oracle Customers

The OUM Customer Program allows customers to obtain copies of the method for their internal use – including guidelines, templates, and tailored work breakdown structure – in one of two ways:

  • OUM Customer Program – No-Cost Option:
    Customers, who have a signed contract with Oracle for a consulting engagement of two weeks or longer meeting some additional minimum criteria, are permitted to download the current release of OUM for their perpetual use. They may also obtain subsequent releases published during a renewable, three year access period.
  • OUM Customer Program – Purchase Option:
    Customers who do not qualify for the free option, and who do not wish to engage Oracle consultants, can opt to purchase the OUM Method Pack. The price for an unlimited, perpetual license is 16,000 USD. This allows the customer to distribute OUM within their enterprise for internal use. At the time of purchase, customers are also able to purchase an initial three year subscription for 15% of the purchase price or 2,400 USD. After the initial subscription period, the subscription may be renewed annually for 2,400 USD. This subscription allows them to download updates to OUM during the subscription period.

Contact your local Oracle Sales Representative about enrolling in the OUM Customer Program.

    Oracle PartnerNetwork (OPN) Diamond, Platinum, and Gold Partners

    OPN Diamond, Platinum, and Gold Partners are able to access the OUM method pack, training courses, and collateral from the OPN Portal at no additional cost:

    • Go to the OPN Portal at partner.oracle.com.
    • Select "Sign In / Register for Account".
    • Sign In.
    • From the Product Resources section, select "Applications".
    • From the Applications page, locate and select the "Oracle Unified Method" link.
    • From the Oracle Unified Method Knowledge Zone, locate the "I want to:" section.
    • From the I want to: section, locate and select "Implement Solutions".
    • From the Implement Solution page, locate the "Best Practices" section.
    • Locate and select the "Download Oracle Unified Method (OUM)" link.

    Previous Announcements

    Scrum Teams -- Do you feel the rhythm?

    Hi, I’m Terri Merenkov a member of the Global Methods team at Oracle. This month I celebrate my 18th year with Oracle. You might be surprised by that, but many in the Global Methods team have more tenure than I do. This is part of what makes my job so interesting. If I don’t know the answer to something about Oracle Implementation projects of a certain type, I don’t have to go far to find someone who does. Even though some concepts have been around for a while, there is always something new coming so we are constantly adapting and changing.

    We have many things to learn about, today, even though they may have been around for a while, for example Scrum. Scrum was created in 1993 by Jeff Sutherland. The term “scrum” is borrowed from an analogy used in the 1986 study by Takeuchi and Nonaka (Takeuchi), published in the Harvard Business Review. In the study, the authors equated high-performance, cross-functional teams to the packs formed by Rugby teams.

    Here we are nearly two decades later actually applying Scrum in our software development projects. Yet some people think that Scrum is new,maybe it is coming into the mainstream perhaps because we realize that often taking something large and breaking it down helps support a successful software implementation.  It is only now that we're seeing teams celebrate success using Scrum.  Of course, not everyone is successful. Scrum seems so simple, it's often the human factor that really determines how well things go.

    In the 80’s I was very into music, I started in University as a music education major. My major was percussion as well as piano, with a minor in French. At the time, I had no idea what a computer was, however, I was playing electric keyboards “synthesizers” with built-in percussion instruments of course I was enamored with the Mellotron and Moog synthesizers that were being used by some of the progressive rock bands. Once I discovered that music was being cut from the curriculum of many schools, I decided to re-think my major. A software “recruiter” lived across the street from me. She suggested that I try taking some computer courses, since often people who are good at music and language happen to excel in using computers. I began taking classes in computer science, and the more I learned, the more I wanted to know!

    I find it interesting at this point in my life, I’m being reminded of good things that I learned about when I was younger, that are actually useful in my adult life – today.

    Just the other day, I was working on some updates to the Scrum View in OUM and I came across the word “Cadence”. Oh, I thought, I know about Cadence! Any good drummer knows that a cadence is needed to get the marching band to stay in step when marching across the football field or in a parade.  Of course the percussionists are experts in various percussion instruments,

    The percussionists in a marching band have a natural rhythm, in fact when the band is marching in between songs, the percussionists are keeping a cadence that allows everyone to step together, as part of a group, each individual takes nice even steps until we’re in place to play the next song.  This rhythm can me a steady tapping on the drum "rims" or use of the full percussion instrument.

    So think about a Scrum team, just the way you would think about a group of musicians in a band. Good Scrum teams “feel the rhythm” they have a cadence that allows the team to work together easily, almost naturally. With each Sprint retrospective, they examine what worked and what didn’t. Over the course of several Sprints, a true cadence is achieved by the team. A sustainable team cadence leads us to another term used in the Scrum approach; velocity.

    When I think of velocity, I think of speed, but in a software development effort, speed isn’t always our main focus. In Scrum, velocity is obtained by calculating the number of units of work that can be completed by the team during a specific timeframe (Sprint). Velocity refers to the speed at which a team can implement and test use cases (user stories) and change requests (that is, how much of the product backlog the team can complete). This is reflected in the Burndown Charts by showing the progress made so far versus the planned/estimated progress. Of course with each Scrum Sprint, the team becomes more experienced, and can determine velocity based on how many units of work they have completed during previous Sprints.


    Contrary to what some may say, even though Scrum uses the word Sprint, we aren’t necessarily only focused on going as fast as we can until we burn out the team. Rather, we work on building teams that can develop, test and integrate working software in a collaborative, yet agile fashion.  This results in a sustained rhythm. So I ask you - can YOU feel the rhythm? What experiences have you had in building expert teams that work well together?  Have you used Scrum successfully and why?  Listen... do you feel it?


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