Monday Nov 18, 2013

Using the Container Database in Oracle Database 12c by Christopher Andrews


The first time I examined the Oracle Database 12c architecture, I wasn’t quite sure what I thought about the Container Database (CDB). In the current release of the Oracle RDBMS, the administrator now has a choice of whether or not to employ a CDB.

Bundling Databases Inside One Container

In today’s IT industry, consolidation is a common challenge. With potentially hundreds of databases to manage and maintain, an administrator will require a great deal of time and resources to upgrade and patch software. Why not consider deploying a container database to streamline this activity? By “bundling” several databases together inside one container, in the form of a pluggable database, we can save on overhead process resources and CPU time. Furthermore, we can reduce the human effort required for periodically patching and maintaining the software.

Minimizing Storage

Most IT professionals understand the concept of storage, as in solid state or non-rotating. Let’s take one-to-many databases and “plug” them into ONE designated container database. We can minimize many redundant pieces that would otherwise require separate storage and architecture, as was the case in previous releases of the Oracle RDBMS. The data dictionary can be housed and shared in one CDB, with individual metadata content for each pluggable database. We also won’t need as many background processes either, thus reducing the overhead cost of the CPU resource.

Improve Security Levels within Each Pluggable Database 

We can now segregate the CDB-administrator role from that of the pluggable-database administrator as well, achieving improved security levels within each pluggable database and within the CDB. And if the administrator chooses to use the non-CDB architecture, everything is backwards compatible, too.

 The bottom line: it's a good idea to at least consider using a CDB.


About the author:

Chris Andrews is a Canadian instructor of Oracle University who teaches the Server Technologies courses for both 11g and 12c. He has been with Oracle University since 1997 and started training customers back with Oracle 7. While now a Senior Principal Instructor with OU, Chris had an opportunity to work as a DBA for about 10 years before joining Oracle. His background and experiences as a DBA, Database Analyst and also a developer is occasionally shared with customers in the classroom. His skill set includes the Database Administration workshops, Backup & Recovery, Performance Tuning, RAC, Dataguard, ASM, Clusterware and also Exadata and Database Machine administration workshop. While not teaching, Chris enjoys aviation and flying gliders, underwater photography and tennis.

Friday Oct 18, 2013

Oracle Database 12c New Partition Maintenance Features by Gwen Lazenby

One of my favourite new features in Oracle Database 12c is the ability to perform partition maintenance operations on multiple partitions. This means we can now add, drop, truncate and merge multiple partitions in one operation, and can split a single partition into more than two partitions also in just one command. This would certainly have made my life slightly easier had it been available when I administered a data warehouse at Oracle 9i.

To demonstrate this new functionality and syntax, I am going to create two tables, ORDERS and ORDERS_ITEMS which have a parent-child relationship. ORDERS is to be partitioned using range partitioning on the ORDER_DATE column, and ORDER_ITEMS is going to partitioned using reference partitioning and its foreign key relationship with the ORDERS table. This form of partitioning was a new feature in 11g and means that any partition maintenance operations performed on the ORDERS table will also take place on the ORDER_ITEMS table as well.

First create the ORDERS table -

SQL> CREATE TABLE orders
      ( order_id NUMBER(12),
        order_date TIMESTAMP,
        order_mode VARCHAR2(8),
        customer_id NUMBER(6),
        order_status NUMBER(2),
        order_total NUMBER(8,2),
        sales_rep_id NUMBER(6),
        promotion_id NUMBER(6),
       CONSTRAINT orders_pk PRIMARY KEY(order_id)
     )
    PARTITION BY RANGE(order_date)
   (PARTITION Q1_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-APR-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
    PARTITION Q2_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-JUL-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
    PARTITION Q3_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-OCT-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
    PARTITION Q4_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-JAN-2008','DD-MON-YYYY'))
    );

Table created.

Now the ORDER_ITEMS table

SQL> CREATE TABLE order_items
     ( order_id NUMBER(12) NOT NULL,
       line_item_id NUMBER(3) NOT NULL,
       product_id NUMBER(6) NOT NULL,
       unit_price NUMBER(8,2),
       quantity NUMBER(8),
       CONSTRAINT order_items_fk
       FOREIGN KEY(order_id) REFERENCES orders(order_id) on delete cascade)  
       PARTITION BY REFERENCE(order_items_fk) tablespace example;

Table created.

Now look at DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS to get details of what partitions we have in the two tables –

SQL>  select table_name,partition_name,
     partition_position position, high_value
     from dba_tab_partitions
     where table_owner='SH' and
     table_name  like 'ORDER_%'
     order by partition_position, table_name;

TABLE_NAME    PARTITION_NAME   POSITION HIGH_VALUE
-------------- --------------- -------- -------------------------
ORDERS         Q1_2007                1 TIMESTAMP' 2007-04-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q1_2007                1
ORDERS         Q2_2007                2 TIMESTAMP' 2007-07-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q2_2007                2
ORDERS         Q3_2007                3 TIMESTAMP' 2007-10-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q3_2007                3
ORDERS         Q4_2007                4 TIMESTAMP' 2008-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2007                4

Just as an aside it is also now possible in 12c to use interval partitioning on reference partitioned tables. In 11g it was not possible to combine these two new partitioning features.

For our first example of the new 12cfunctionality, let us add all the partitions necessary for 2008 to the tables using one command. Notice that the partition specification part of the add command is identical in format to the partition specification part of the create command as shown above -

SQL> alter table orders add
PARTITION Q1_2008 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-APR-2008','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q2_2008 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-JUL-2008','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q3_2008 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-OCT-2008','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q4_2008 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-JAN-2009','DD-MON-YYYY'));

Table altered.

Now look at DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS and we can see that the 4 new partitions have been added to both tables –

SQL> select table_name,partition_name,
     partition_position position, high_value
     from dba_tab_partitions
     where table_owner='SH' and
     table_name  like 'ORDER_%'
     order by partition_position, table_name;

TABLE_NAME    PARTITION_NAME   POSITION HIGH_VALUE
-------------- --------------- -------- -------------------------
ORDERS         Q1_2007                1 TIMESTAMP' 2007-04-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q1_2007                1
ORDERS         Q2_2007                2 TIMESTAMP' 2007-07-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q2_2007                2
ORDERS         Q3_2007                3 TIMESTAMP' 2007-10-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q3_2007                3
ORDERS         Q4_2007                4 TIMESTAMP' 2008-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2007                4
ORDERS         Q1_2008                5 TIMESTAMP' 2008-04-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q1_2008                5
ORDERS         Q2_2008                6 TIMESTAMP' 2008-07-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEM     Q2_2008                6
ORDERS         Q3_2008                7 TIMESTAMP' 2008-10-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q3_2008                7
ORDERS         Q4_2008                8 TIMESTAMP' 2009-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2008                8

Next, we can drop or truncate multiple partitions by giving a comma separated list in the alter table command. Note the use of the plural ‘partitions’ in the command as opposed to the singular ‘partition’ prior to 12c

SQL> alter table orders drop partitions Q3_2008,Q2_2008,Q1_2008;

Table altered.

Now look at DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS and we can see that the 3 partitions have been dropped in both the two tables –

TABLE_NAME    PARTITION_NAME   POSITION HIGH_VALUE
-------------- --------------- -------- -------------------------
ORDERS         Q1_2007                1 TIMESTAMP' 2007-04-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q1_2007                1
ORDERS         Q2_2007                2 TIMESTAMP' 2007-07-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q2_2007                2
ORDERS         Q3_2007                3 TIMESTAMP' 2007-10-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q3_2007                3
ORDERS         Q4_2007                4 TIMESTAMP' 2008-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2007                4
ORDERS         Q4_2008                5 TIMESTAMP' 2009-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2008                5

Now let us merge all the 2007 partitions together to form one single partition –

SQL> alter table orders merge partitions
   Q1_2005, Q2_2005, Q3_2005, Q4_2005
   into partition Y_2007;

Table altered.

TABLE_NAME    PARTITION_NAME   POSITION HIGH_VALUE
-------------- --------------- -------- -------------------------
ORDERS         Y_2007                 1 TIMESTAMP' 2008-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Y_2007                 1
ORDERS         Q4_2008                2 TIMESTAMP' 2009-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2008                2

Splitting partitions is a slightly more involved. In the case of range partitioning one of the new partitions must have no high value defined, and in list partitioning one of the new partitions must have no list of values defined. I call these partitions the ‘everything else’ partitions, and will contain any rows contained in the original partition that are not contained in the any of the other new partitions.

For example, let us split the Y_2007 partition back into 4 quarterly partitions –

SQL> alter table orders split partition Y_2007 into 
(PARTITION Q1_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-APR-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q2_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-JUL-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q3_2007 VALUES LESS THAN (TO_DATE('01-OCT-2007','DD-MON-YYYY')),
PARTITION Q4_2007);

Now look at DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS to get details of the new partitions –


TABLE_NAME    PARTITION_NAME   POSITION HIGH_VALUE
-------------- --------------- -------- -------------------------
ORDERS         Q1_2007                1 TIMESTAMP' 2007-04-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q1_2007                1
ORDERS         Q2_2007                2 TIMESTAMP' 2007-07-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q2_2007                2
ORDERS         Q3_2007                3 TIMESTAMP' 2007-10-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q3_2007                3
ORDERS         Q4_2007                4 TIMESTAMP' 2008-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2007                4
ORDERS         Q4_2008                5 TIMESTAMP' 2009-01-01 00:00:00'
ORDER_ITEMS    Q4_2008                5

Partition Q4_2007 has a high value equal to the high value of the original Y_2007 partition, and so has inherited its upper boundary from the partition that was split.

As for a list partitioning example let look at the following another table, SALES_PAR_LIST, which has 2 partitions, Americas and Europe and a partitioning key of country_name.

SQL> select table_name,partition_name,
   high_value
   from dba_tab_partitions
   where table_owner='SH' and
   table_name = 'SALES_PAR_LIST';

TABLE_NAME      PARTITION_NAME   HIGH_VALUE
--------------  ---------------  -----------------------------
SALES_PAR_LIST  AMERICAS         'Argentina', 'Canada', 'Peru',
                                 'USA', 'Honduras', 'Brazil', 'Nicaragua'
SALES_PAR_LIST  EUROPE           'France', 'Spain', 'Ireland', 'Germany',
                                 'Belgium', 'Portugal', 'Denmark'

Now split the Americas partition into 3 partitions –

SQL> alter table sales_par_list split partition americas into
   (partition south_america values ('Argentina','Peru','Brazil'),
   partition north_america values('Canada','USA'),
   partition central_america);

Table altered.

Note that no list of values was given for the ‘Central America’ partition. However it should have inherited any values in the original ‘Americas’ partition that were not assigned to either the ‘North America’ or ‘South America’ partitions. We can confirm this by looking at the DBA_TAB_PARTITIONS view.

SQL> select table_name,partition_name,
   high_value
   from dba_tab_partitions
   where table_owner='SH' and
   table_name = 'SALES_PAR_LIST';

TABLE_NAME      PARTITION_NAME   HIGH_VALUE
--------------- ---------------  --------------------------------
SALES_PAR_LIST  SOUTH_AMERICA    'Argentina', 'Peru', 'Brazil'
SALES_PAR_LIST  NORTH_AMERICA    'Canada', 'USA'
SALES_PAR_LIST  CENTRAL_AMERICA  'Honduras', 'Nicaragua'
SALES_PAR_LIST  EUROPE           'France', 'Spain', 'Ireland', 'Germany',
                                 'Belgium', 'Portugal', 'Denmark'

In conclusion, I hope that DBA’s whose work involves maintaining partitions will find the operations a bit more straight forward to carry out once they have upgraded to Oracle Database 12c.

Gwen Lazenby

Gwen Lazenby is a Principal Training Consultant at Oracle.

She is part of Oracle University's Core Technology delivery team based in the UK, teaching Database Administration and Linux courses. Her specialist topics include using Oracle Partitioning and Parallelism in Data Warehouse environments, as well as Oracle Spatial and RMAN.

Tuesday May 07, 2013

Create a high availability 12C weblogic clustering environment with Traffic Director 11gR1 by Eugene Simos

Traffic director is one of the latest load balancer software, released by Oracle.
In fact its a fast, reliable, scalable and very easy manageable solution, for HTTP, HTTPS, TCP traffic for backend application and HTTP servers.

I have used the latest version of both traffic director, and weblogic 12c, to setup a simple clustering replication session scenario, on my Linux 64bits VBox sandbox.

For this scenario, the Traffic Director, is configured as a front end to a backend weblogic 12C cluster.

A specific feature "dynamic discovery", will let Traffic Director, discover on "the fly" new clustered Weblogic Nodes, associated with its initial configuration, and I will be able to "join" to my initial " 3 nodes wls cluster an another wls instance (doted line), with full HTTP replication capabilities.

In order to test the session replication I used one sample application, delivered as such, with the wls 12 installation (I will detail the utilization of this application in a later post :) ), which I called Session, and I will test the failover features of wls 12, with the Traffic Director, with this Session application deployed on my cluster!

The binary distribution, of the Traffic Director can be download from here:

Once that the distribution is download to my linux box, i started the normal FMW installation workflow:

Passing the normal test on the Linux system components, and choose an empty Oracle Traffic director Home for the software installation :

I saved the response file (I might use next time the silent installer !)

Then after saving the installation details, I start to configure my Traffic Director instances as following :
1) Create one admin instance (I used just the default settings) and an "default user" admin/welcome1

2) Start the instance from the installation directory:

3 ) I used the Traffic Director admin interface : https://localhost:8989, and with my credentials ( from section 1 admin/welcome1) I got the first admin panel

Once that I m logged into the Traffic Director, I m getting a initial "welcome" screen, and I have to create my own configurations according to my wls 12 cluster:

My Weblogic 12c cluster, was configured initially with 3 nodes, and i will add later one more managed instance. I have to create a specific Traffic Director configuration to route the traffic to my backend servers.

Through the Traffic Director configuration wizard, i will create a node on my local linux ( port 8080) , which will push the HTTP requests to my wls 12c clustred servers.
The Traffic Director node will use the specific feature of dynamic discovery in order to be able to push the HTTP request to other wls 12c clustered instances that will join the cluster later:

Then I started my 3 wls 12c clustered instances, on which I deployed my test Session replication application, and i started to test the Session replication scenario thought the Traffic Director node:

As you can see, my session has been created to the M1 node of my cluster.
I have created some data with this session, then I stopped the M1 node ( node failure simulation) and re submitted the request to the wls 12 cluster.

As you can see the session failover feature of the wls 12c worked perfectly, and now my session is on the M2 wls clustered node with the same date as on the previous failed M1 node !

For the dynamic discovery, I created one more managed server in the cluster (M4), then stopped the M2 server, and retried the Session application URL through the Traffic director node!
As you can see the Traffic Director routed the request to the new clustered server, with all the session replication data.

In a next post , we will deploy the Session application in a weblogic cluster, and we will use it as a test application, for the session replication features of weblogic.

About the Author:


Eugene Simos is based in France and joined Oracle through the BEA-Weblogic Acquisition, where he worked for the Professional Service, Support, end Education for major accounts across the EMEA Region. He worked in the banking sector, ATT, Telco companies giving him extensive experience on production environments. Eugene currently specializes in Oracle Fusion Middleware teaching an array of courses on Weblogic/Webcenter, Content,BPM /SOA/Identity-Security/GoldenGate/Virtualisation/Unified Comm Suite) throughout the EMEA region.

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