Tuesday Feb 26, 2013

Embedded Development: It's Not Just a Good Idea, It's the Law

Mobile World Congress this week in Barcelona is a gathering of over 70,000 people to discuss the state of mobile communications. As the MWC brochure says, "The mobile ecosystem is expanding at lightning speed, with endless innovation and new applications of mobile technology." Mobile World Congress used to just be about mobile phones and the industry surrounding them, but now "mobile" has redefined itself and is about sensors everywhere: cars, scooters, buildings, people, etc. The M2M (or "Internet of Everything") revolution is here, with mobile phones as just one of the many components that create an intelligent, connected world. The opportunities for developers in embedded and remote systems is almost endless.

embedded carThere are several cars on display at Mobile World Congress. They have infotainment systems, GPS maps, and sensors recording everything from temperature to tire pressure. Embedded systems for cars is so pervasive that the European Union has started the process of requiring embedded technologies in all new cars by 2015.  It wants the life-saving eCall system to be fitted to all new models of cars and light vehicles. eCall is activated automatically as soon as in-vehicle sensors detect a serious crash. Once set off, the system dials the European emergency number 112, establishes a telephone link to the appropriate emergency call center and sends details of the accident to the rescue services, including the time of incident, the accurate position of the crashed vehicle and the direction of travel (most important on motorways and in tunnels).

Who is going to develop the apps for these innovative, embedded systems? You? If you want to get started, you should check out Java. Java has been on devices for a long time: smart cards, cars, ATMs, phones, underwater probes, and more. Java enables devices to be intelligent, scalable and supportable. Already know Java? Great, you can easily develop for sensors of any size. Learn more at OTN/Java