X

Maximize Your Oracle Technology Investment with Quality Training and Certification from the Source

MySQL Cluster - What You Need To Know

Diana Gray
Sr. Principal Curriculum Product Manager

Written by Diana Gray, Principal Curriculum Product Manager, Oracle University

Did You Know?

MySQL Cluster automatically shards data across data nodes on separate hosts which means that your database performance scales naturally as you add more nodes.

Data nodes belong to node groups that replicate data internally so that if one data node fails, another data node carries on working with a copy of the failed node's data. This ensures high availability as well as scalability.

Data nodes can run on commodity hardware, and have very few requirements.

This means that it is possible to create large-scale clusters on relatively inexpensive computers, and it is simple to extend a running cluster by adding data nodes while the cluster is operational.

For example, in a simple cluster you can add a new data node to the cluster by copying a single binary to the new host and executing it with an option that refers to the cluster's management node. You can redistribute data among the new node groups with a single command, and from that point on the cluster automatically distributes data among all of the data nodes.

If your clustered database becomes too large to be contained in the memory of a single node group, you can add additional nodes (and therefore node groups).

MySQL Cluster distributes data between node groups, so that each node group contains a fraction of the overall database. This means that if you have four node groups in your cluster, each node group holds approximately one quarter of the cluster's data and responds to roughly one quarter of the cluster's row requests.

As your requirements grow (data or throughput), you can add more node groups to scale the database without making any changes to your existing applications.

You can back up the entire cluster's data on all data nodes with a single START BACKUP command issued on the management node. MySQL Cluster Manager makes it easy to start and stop an entire cluster.

You can reconfigure all data nodes in the cluster with a single command that not only changes the setting but also restarts each node in turn without bringing down the cluster.

To find out more about MySQL Cluster, take the new MySQL Cluster training course.

This MySQL Cluster training teaches you how to install and configure a real-time database cluster at the core of your application. Expert instructors will teach you how to design and maintain your clusters for high availability and scalability by using MySQL Cluster's open-source and enterprise components.

This 4-day training course is a must for those who want to learn about MySQL Cluster. You'll not only learn about the concepts and features; you'll also get extensive hands-on experience. You can follow this training course from your own desk via a Live Virtual Class or by attending class at an education center. 

Get more information about the MySQL curriculum

Be the first to comment

Comments ( 0 )
Please enter your name.Please provide a valid email address.Please enter a comment.CAPTCHA challenge response provided was incorrect. Please try again.