Thursday Jul 31, 2014

LDAP Enhancements in 12.2.1

In Ops Center 12.2 and older versions, there were limitations on how a user pulled from an LDAP could log in to Ops Center - basically, users could only log in using the user name field.

One of the improvements in version 12.2.1 is that an Ops Center Admin can designate other fields, such as email address, name, or member ID, to be used when logging in to Ops Center.

The Admin Guide's section on Users and Roles has more information about adding users from directory servers.

Thursday Jul 24, 2014

Upgrading to version 12.2.1

Now that Ops Center 12.2.1 is out, I thought I'd give a brief walkthrough of the upgrade process.

The first thing to do if you're planning on upgrading to 12.2.1 is checking the upgrade paths. If you're using an older version of Ops Center, such as 12.1.4, you'll have to upgrade to version 12.2 first. Here's a flowchart that shows the supported upgrade paths:

Once you've figured out your upgrade path, you should check the release notes. They have a list of known issues that could be relevant to your environment. In particular, if you're using version 12.2, there's a patch that you have to apply if you want to upgrade through the UI.

Once you've taken a look at the release notes, the Upgrade Guide will take you through the upgrade itself, with different procedures based on how you're doing your upgrade (through the UI or command line) and what sort of environment you have.

Monday Jul 21, 2014

Version 12.2.1 Released

Version 12.2.1 of Ops Center is out today.

There are a number of improvements in this version. The big ones are:

  • Support for discovering x86 64-bit Oracle Sun X4-8 servers through the ILOM SP.
  • Additional options for adding users from an external LDAP, using characteristics like full name or email addresses as Ops Center user names.
  • Audit logs let admins track Ops Center jobs, user logins, and changes to a user's roles.
  • A generic CPU architecture lets you migrate logical domains between systems with different architectures.

We've also made a number of performance enhancements - cutting the start-up times for several parts of Ops Center - and a number of bug fixes. You can find the full listing of what's new here.

For information about upgrading to 12.2.1, take a look at the Upgrade Guide.

If you're on 12.2, you'll need to apply a patch to your environment if you want to upgrade through the UI.  See the Release Notes for more information.

Thursday Jul 17, 2014

Java versions for Agents

I recently saw a question from the field regarding Agent installation:

"I'm trying to manage a group of servers with Ops Center. They use Java 1.5; is that going to be a problem?"

No, it shouldn't be. The Ops Center Agent uses Java 1.6, but it will install Java 1.6 if it's not already there. Java 1.5 and 1.6 can coexist on your systems. As long as Ops Center can get to Java 1.6 in the default location, it should work fine.

Thursday Jul 10, 2014

How-To: Configuring NAS Libraries

Server Pools in Ops Center let you group multiple virtualization hosts together and migrate guests between them. For guests to be migratable, though, the storage for the guests must be accessible to all of the hosts.

One way that you can make accessible storage is by configuring a NAS library. The library puts the guest storage in an NFS share that can be accessed by the virtualization hosts, enabling migration.

One of our how-tos, the creatively titled Configuring NAS Libraries how-to, walks you through the steps of configuring a NAS library - creating the NFS share on the storage server, then identifying it and creating the library in Ops Center. There's a workflow that explains when to use the several how-tos related to storage library deployment, as well.

Thursday Jul 03, 2014

How-To: Using Complex Plans

You can use Ops Center to perform some very complex tasks. For instance, you might use it to provision several operating systems across your environment, with multiple configurations for each OS.

Complex plans let you standardize each part of processes like that, and fit them together in different ways based on your environment's needs. You can create an OS provisioning profile for a specific OS, then create an OS configuration profile for one of the configurations your environment needs, and then put them together in a complex plan. By running the complex plan on the target systems, you ensure that no part of the process is being left out or performed inconsistently.

We've put together a how-to that demonstrates how complex plans work, using an Install Server plan as an example.


This blog discusses issues encountered in Ops Center and highlights the ways in which the documentation can help you


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