Thursday May 02, 2013

How to Monitor Systems in Enterprise Manager using Ops Center

In this post, we'll use Ops Center to add hardware monitoring to Enterprise Manager. We'll discuss the existing capabilities of Host targets, show how to create an Infrastructure Stack and demonstrate some of the features it provides to Enterprise Manager.



A recording of this community call is now available here:

WebEx Recording: Ops Center integration with Cloud Control
          


Prerequisites

This blog post uses both the Enterprise Manager 12c Cloud Control and Ops Center products. The following list describes the initial setup state and provides links to Oracle documents you can use to install and configure both products:

  • Enterprise Manager 12c
    • Install and configure an Oracle Management Server and Repository (OMS and OMR)
    • Install the Oracle Management Agent (OMA) on a target OS instance
  • Ops Center 12c
    • Install and Configure the Enterprise and Proxy Controller (EC and PC)
    • Discover and manage the system and its associated OS (installing the Ops Center agent on the OS instance)

I've configured the environment for this post in the following way:

  • Enterprise Manager 12c: OMS and OMR running separately
  • Ops Center 12c: EC and PC running co-located
  • Two sample systems, both running Solaris 11
    • An Oracle SPARC T4-2 server
    • An Oracle SunFire X4200 M2 server

Host Capabilities in Enterprise Manager

By default, installing an Enterprise Manager agent on an OS instance creates an associated Host target. A Host provides a lot of useful data about the platform that hosts the OMA, such as

  • CPU and memory utilization
  • File system size and utilization
  • Network interfaces and activity
  • Program and process resources
  • User activity

The Host does not provide sensor data associated with the server and cannot report issues with the underlying hardware. Fortunately Ops Center can do both of these things, and you can incorporate server data, monitoring thresholds and alerts into your Enterprise Manager environment.

Setting Up an Infrastructure Stack

Ops Center: Configure the connection to Enterprise Manager

To connect Ops Center with Enterprise Manager, select the left-hand Navigation link Administration > Enterprise Manager Cloud Control. Click on the right-hand Action link Configure/Connect and open a pop-up dialog box. The dialog lets you configure the OMS and OMR settings. The screen shot below shows both steps from the wizard.

Enterprise Manager: Download and deploy the Ops Center Plug-In

Enterprise Manager 12c provides a deployable plug-in to manage an Infrastructure Stack. For Enterprise Manager installations running in online mode, you can download it from the Extensibility > Plug-Ins menu from the Servers, Storage and Network category.

Download and deploy the plug-in to the OMS. You can immediately deploy it to the OMA instances you want to integrate with Ops Center, or wait until you create an infrastructure stack. (Enterprise Manager will automatically install the plug-in to the OMA if it is not already present)

Enterprise Manager: Create an Infrastructure Stack Target

An Infrastructure Stack associates data from a system in Ops Center with targets in Enterprise Manager. To create one, select the menu option Setup > Add Targets > Add Targets Manually. From the wizard, select Infrastructure Stack from the pull-down menu and identify the Monitoring Agent that will be used.

The subsequent configuration screen allows you to define the name for the target, to identify the Enterprise Controller that will provide the data for the server, and to specify the Ops Center login credentials. Any user account defined in Ops Center is suitable for the target.

Infrastructure Stack Capabilities

What benefits does an Infrastructure Stack provide? As the consolidation point for server-related information, it enables you to perform three principal tasks:

  • Monitoring, with metrics and thresholds for the server
  • Reporting, using a set of standard Information Publisher reports
  • Incident Management, with Ops Center hardware alerts

Let's look at some examples for each.

Monitoring

An Infrastructure Stack provides a wealth of information about a server, including identification information, state, capabilities and sensor data. The home page provides a summary of current values for power consumption, temperature, fan speed, and reported incidents.

The metrics section provides more detailed data such as sensor values, thresholds, installed firmware and server capabilities.

Note that the reported values ultimately depend on what data is available for a specific type of server. Some earlier models don't report temperature data, for instance.

Reporting

Enterprise Manager provides three standard Information Publisher reports:

  • Infrastructure Stack Topology, showing the server and OS associated with the stack
  • Infrastructure Stack Configuration, providing a tabular summary of key data
  • Hardware Sensors, showing current values and thresholds for monitored server data

The following screen shots provide sample report output for the infrastructure stack configuration and hardware sensor data.

Incident Management

Incident reporting is an optional capability for an Infrastructure Stack. Enabling the feature causes Ops Center to forward hardware alarms, allowing you to consolidate problem management in Enterprise Manager.

To enable incident reporting, navigate to the Infrastructure Stack and select the menu option Monitoring > Metric and Collection Settings. Select the link Collection Schedule for Infrastructure Stack Alarms to edit the settings:

If you toggle the collection schedule to Enabled, Enterprise Manager will activate incident reporting based on hardware alarms. By default, the data refresh frequency is once every five minutes, with warning or critical alarms being reported.

In this example, we simulated an hardware alarm using the IPMItool utility from the Hardware Management Pack. Ops Center forwarded the event and all associated data, which generated an actionable incident in Enterprise Manager,

Summary

In this post, we have demonstrated how to integrate Ops Center data into Enterprise Manager, and described the features available for an Infrastructure Stack. If you would like to learn more, please join us for the WebEx demo on May 9th.


Thursday Nov 15, 2012

Ops Center Solaris 11 IPS Repository Management: Using ISO Images

A recording of this community call is now available here:

https://oracleconferencing.webex.com/oracleconferencing/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=71862997&rKey=76be5a666dc12c90

With Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c, you can provision, patch, monitor and manage Oracle Solaris 11 instances. To do this, Ops Center creates and maintains a Solaris 11 Image Packaging System (IPS) repository on the Enterprise Controller. During the Enterprise Controller configuration, you can load repository content directly from Oracle's Support Web site and subsequently synchronize the repository as new content becomes available.

Of course, you can also use Solaris 11 ISO images to create and update your Ops Center repository. There are a few excellent reasons for doing this:

  1. You're running Ops Center in disconnected mode, and don't have Internet access on your Enterprise Controller
  2. You'd rather avoid the bandwidth associated with live synchronization of a Solaris 11 package repository

This demo will show you how to use Solaris 11 ISO images to set up and update your Ops Center repository.


Prerequisites

This tip assumes that you've already installed the Enterprise Controller on a Solaris 11 OS instance and that you're ready for post-install configuration.

In addition, there are specific Ops Center and OS version requirements depending on which version of Solaris 11 you plan to install.You can get full details about the requirements in the Release Notes for Ops Center 12c update 2.

Additional information is available in the Ops Center update 2 Readme document.


Part 1: Using a Solaris 11 ISO Image to Create an Ops Center Repository

Step 1 – Download the Solaris 11 Repository Image

The Oracle Web site provides a number of download links for official Solaris 11 images. Among those links is a two-part downloadable repository image, which provides repository content for Solaris 11 SPARC and X86 architectures. In this case, I used the Solaris 11 11/11 image.

First, navigate to the Oracle Web site and accept the OTN License agreement:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/server-storage/solaris11/downloads/index.html

Next, download both parts of the Solaris 11 repository image. I used the Solaris 11 11/11 image, and have provided the URLs here:

http://download.oracle.com/otn/solaris/11/sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso-a
http://download.oracle.com/otn/solaris/11/sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso-b

Finally, use the cat command to generate an ISO image you can use to create your repository:
# cat sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso-a sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso-b > sol-11-1111-repo-full.iso

The process is very similar if you plan to set up a Solaris 11.1 release in Ops Center. In that case, navigate to the Solaris 11 download page, accept the license agreement and download both parts of the Solaris 11.1 repository image. Use the cat command to create a single ISO image for Solaris 11.1

Step 2 – Mount the Solaris 11 ISO Image in your Local Filesystem

Once you have created the Solaris 11 ISO file, use the mount command to attach it to your local filesystem. After the image has been mounted, you can browse the repository from the ./repo subdirectory, and use the pkgrepo command to verify that Solaris 11 recognizes the content:


Step 3 – Use the Image to Create your Ops Center Repository

When you have confirmed the repository is available, you can use the image to create the Enterprise Controller repository. The operation will be slightly different depending on whether you configure Ops Center for Connected or Disconnected Mode operation.

For connected mode operation, specify the mounted ./repo directory in step 4.1 of the configuration wizard, replacing the default Web-based URL. Since you're synchronizing from an OS repository image, you don't need to specify a key or certificate for the operation.


For disconnected mode configuration, specify the Solaris 11 directory along with the path to the disconnected mode bundle downloaded by running the Ops Center harvester script:

Ops Center will run a job to import package content from the mounted ISO image. A synchronization job can take several hours to run – in my case, the job ran for 3 hours, 22 minutes on a SunFire X4200 M2 server.


During the job, Ops Center performs three important tasks:

  1. Synchronizes all content from the image and refreshes the repository
  2. Updates the IPS publisher information
  3. Creates OS Provisioning profiles and policies based on the content

When the job is complete, you can unmount the ISO image from your Enterprise Controller. At that time, you can view the repository contents in your Ops Center Solaris 11 library. For the Solaris 11 11/11 release, you should see 8,668 packages and patches in the contents.


You should also see default deployment plans for Solaris 11 provisioning. As part of the repository import, Ops Center generates plans and profiles for desktop, small and large servers for the SPARC and X86 architecture.



Part 2: Using a Solaris 11 SRU to update an Ops Center Repository

It's possible to use the same approach to upgrade your Ops Center repository to a Solaris 11 Support Repository Update, or SRU. Each SRU provides packages and updates to Solaris 11 - for example, SRU 8.5 provided the packaged for Oracle VM Server for SPARC 2.2

SRUs are available for download as ISO images from My Oracle Support, under document ID 1372094.1. The document provides download links for all SRUs which have been released by Oracle for Solaris 11. SRUs are cumulative, so later versions include the packages from earlier SRUs.


After downloading an ISO image for an SRU, you can mount it to your local filesystem using a mount command similar to the one shown for Solaris 11 11/11.

When the ISO image is mounted to the file system, you can perform the Add Content action from the Solaris 11 Library to synchronize packages and patches from the mounted image. I used the same mount point, so the repository URL was file://mnt/repo once again:


After the synchronization of an SRU is complete, you can verify its content in the Solaris 11 library using the search function. The version pattern is 0.175.0.#, where the # is the same value as the SRU.

In this example, I upgraded to SRU 1. The update job ran in just under 8 minutes, and a quick search shows that 22 software components were added to the repository:


It's also possible to search for "Support Repository Update" to confirm the SRU was successfully added to the repository. Details on any of the update content are available by clicking the "View Details" button under the Packages/Patches entry.


Wednesday Nov 07, 2012

Keeping track of File System Utilization in Ops Center 12c

Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c provides significant monitoring capabilities, combined with very flexible incident management. These capabilities even extend to monitoring the file systems associated with Solaris or Linux assets. Depending on your needs you can monitor and manage incidents, or you can fine tune alert monitoring rules to specific file systems.

This article will show you how to use Ops Center 12c to

  • Track file system utilization
  • Adjust file system monitoring rules
  • Disable file system rules
  • Create custom monitoring rules

A recording of this community call is now available here:

https://oracleconferencing.webex.com/oracleconferencing/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=71648742&rKey=a8b3b199a3d9a997

Monitoring File Systems for OS Assets

The Libraries tab provides basic, device-level information about the storage associated with an OS instance. This tab shows you the local file system associated with the instance and any shared storage libraries mounted by Ops Center.

More detailed information about file system storage is available under the Analytics tab under the sub-tab named Charts. Here, you can select and display the individual mount points of an OS, and export the utilization data if desired:


In this example, the OS instance has a basic root file partition and several NFS directories. Each file system mount point can be independently chosen for display in the Ops Center chart.

File Systems and Incident  Reporting

Every asset managed by Ops Center has a "monitoring policy", which determines what represents a reportable issue with the asset. The policy is made up of a bunch of monitoring rules, where each rule describes

  • An attribute to monitor
  • The conditions which represent an issue
  • The level or levels of severity for the issue

When the conditions are met, Ops Center sends a notification and creates an incident.

By default, OS instances have three monitoring rules associated with file systems:

  • File System Reachability: Triggers an incident if a file system is not reachable
  • NAS Library Status: Triggers an incident for a value of "WARNING" or "DEGRADED" for a NAS-based file system
  • File System Used Space Percentage: Triggers an incident when file system utilization grows beyond defined thresholds

You can view these rules in the Monitoring tab for an OS:

Of course, the default monitoring rules is that they apply to every file system associated with an OS instance. As a result, any issue with NAS accessibility or disk utilization will trigger an incident. This can cause incidents for file systems to be reported multiple times if the same shared storage is used by many assets, as shown in this screen shot:


Depending on the level of control you'd like, there are a number of ways to fine tune incident reporting.

Note that any changes to an asset's monitoring policy will detach it from the default, creating a new monitoring policy for the asset. If you'd like, you can extract a monitoring policy from an asset, which allows you to save it and apply the customized monitoring profile to other OS assets.


Solution #1: Modify the Reporting Thresholds

In some cases, you may want to modify the basic conditions for incident reporting in your file system. The changes you make to a default monitoring rule will apply to all of the file systems associated with your operating system. Selecting the File Systems Used Space Percentage entry and clicking the "Edit Alert Monitoring Rule Parameters" button opens a pop-up dialog which allows you to modify the rule.

The first screen lets you decide when you will check for file system usage, and how long you will wait before opening an incident in Ops Center. By default, Ops Center monitors continuously and reports disk utilization issues which exist for more than 15 minutes.

The second screen lets you define actual threshold values. By default, Ops Center opens a Warning level incident is utilization rises above 80%, and a Critical level incident for utilization above 95%

Solution #2: Disable Incident Reporting for File System

If you'd rather not report file system incidents, you can disable the monitoring rules altogether. In this case, you can select the monitoring rules and click the "Disable Alert Monitoring Rule(s)" button to open the pop-up confirmation dialog.

Like the first solution, this option affects all file system monitoring. It allows you to completely disable incident reporting for NAS library status or file system space consumption.

Solution #3: Create New Monitoring Rules for Specific File Systems

If you'd like to have the greatest flexibility when monitoring file systems, you can create entirely new rules. Clicking the "Add Alert Monitoring Rule" (the icon with the green plus sign) opens a wizard which allows you to define a new rule.

 This rule will be based on a threshold, and will be used to monitor operating system assets. We'd like to add a rule to track disk utilization for a specific file system - the /nfs-guest directory. To do this, we specify the following attribute

FileSystemUsages.name=/nfs-guest.usedSpacePercentage

The value of name in the attribute allows us to define a specific NFS shared directory or file system... in the case of this OS, we could have chosen any of the values shown in the File Systems Utilization chart at the beginning of this article.

usedSpacePercentage lets us define a threshold based on the percentage of total disk space used. There are a number of other values that we could use for threshold-based monitoring of FileSystemUsages, including

  • freeSpace
  • freeSpacePercentage
  • totalSpace
  • usedSpace
  • usedSpacePercentage

The final sections of the screen allow us to determine when to monitor for disk usage, and how long to wait after utilization reaches a threshold before creating an incident. The next screen lets us define the threshold values and severity levels for the monitoring rule:

If historical data is available, Ops Center will display it in the screen. Clicking the Apply button will create the new monitoring rule and active it in your monitoring policy.


If you combine this with one of the previous solutions, you can precisely define which file systems will generate incidents and notifications. For example, this monitoring policy has the default "File System Used Space Percentage" rule disabled, but the new rule reports ONLY on utilization for the /nfs-guest directory.


Stay Connected:

Twitter |  Facebook |  YouTube |  Linkedin |  Newsletter

Thursday Sep 13, 2012

Upgrading Agent Controllers in Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c recently released an upgrade for Solaris Agent Controllers. In this week's blog post, we'll show you how to upgrade agent controllers.

Detailed instructions about upgrading Agent Controllers are available in the product documentation here. This blog post uses an Enterprise Controller which is configured for connected mode operation. If you'd like to apply the agent update in a disconnected installation, additional instructions are available here.

Step 1: Download Agent Controller Updates

With a connected mode Ops Center installation, you can check for product updates at any time by selecting the Enterprise Controller from the left-hand Administration navigation tab.

Select the right-hand Action link “Ops Center Downloads” to open a pop-up dialog displaying any new product updates. In this example, the Enterprise Controller has already been upgraded to the latest version (Update 1, also shown as build version 2076) so only the Agent Controller updates will appear.

There are three updates available: one for Solaris 10 X86, one for Solaris 8-10 SPARC, and one for all versions of Solaris 11. Note that the last update in the screen shot is the Solaris 11 update; for details on any of the downloads, place your mouse over the information icon under the details column for a pop-up text region.

Select the software to download and click the Next button to display the Ops Center license agreement.

Review and click the check box to accept the license agreement, then click the Next button to begin downloading the software.


The status screen shows the current download status. If desired, you can perform the downloads as a background job. Simply click the check box, then click the next button to proceed to the summary screen.


The summary screen shows the updates to be downloaded as well as the current status. Clicking the Finish button will close the dialog and return to the Browser UI. The download job will continue to run in Ops Center and progress can still be viewed from the jobs menu at the bottom of the browser window.

Step 2: Check the Version of Existing Agent Controllers

After the download job completes, you can check the availability of agent updates as well as the current versions of your Agent Controllers from the left-hand Assets navigation tab.

Select “Operating Systems” from the pull-down tab lets to display only OS assets. Next, select “Solaris” in the left-hand tab to display the Solaris assets. Finally, select the Summary tab in the center display panel to show which versions of agent controllers are installed in your data center.


Notice that a few of the OS assets are not displayed in the Agent Controllers tab. Ops Center will not display OS instances which do not have an Agent Controller installation. This includes Enterprise Controllers and Proxy Controllers (unless the agent has been activated on the OS instance) and and OS instances using agentless management.

For Agent Controllers which support an update, the version of agent software (in this example, 2083) appears to the right of the currently installed version.

Step 3: Upgrade Your Agent Controllers

If desired, you can upgrade agent controllers from the previous screen by selecting the desired systems and clicking the upgrade button. Alternatively, you can click the link “Upgrade All Agent Controllers” in the right-hand Actions menu:

In either case, a pop-up dialog lets you start the upgrade process. The first screen in the dialog lets you choose the upgrade method:

Ops Center provides three ways to upgrade agent controllers:

  • Automatic Upgrade: If Agent Controllers are running on all assets, Ops Center can automatically upgrade the software to the latest version without requiring any login credentials to the system
  • SSH using a single set of credentials: If all assets use the same login credentials, you can apply a single set to all assets for the upgrade process. The log-in credentials are the same ones used for asset discovery and management, which are stored in the Plan Management navigation tab under Credentials.
  • SSH using individual credentials: If assets use different login credentials, you can select a different set for each asset.

After selecting the upgrade method, click the Next button to proceed to the summary screen. Click the Finish button to close the pop-up dialog and start the upgrade job for the agent controllers.

The upgrade job runs a series of tasks in parallel, and will upgrade all agents which have been selected. Once the job completes, the OS instances in your data center will be upgraded and running the latest version of Agent Controller software.

Monday Jul 23, 2012

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c Update 1 - Additional Information and Best Practices

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c Update 1 was released earlier this month. Eran Steiner , Technical Architect, Oracle Enterprise Manager, adds some additional information and best practices about upgrading to Ops Center 12c Update 1 in this blog.

Eran hosted a call to provide an overview of Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c Update 1 and answer any questions.The recording of this call is available here and the presentation can be downloaded here.

[Read More]

Monday May 21, 2012

Benefits of using Ops Center to deploy and manage Solaris 11

One of the more significant new features in Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c is the ability to install Ops Center on Oracle Solaris 11, and to deploy and manage systems running Solaris 11.  The Solaris 11 capabilities are in addition to the analogous features for Solaris 10 and Linux, which can all be handled from the same Ops Center infrastructure.

When the Ops Center Enterprise Controller (EC) is installed on a system running Solaris 11, the EC can create a Solaris 11 Software Update Library containing Oracle Solaris Image Packaging System (IPS) content that is synchronized with the main Oracle repository at pkg.oracle.com. The Ops Center managed Solaris 11 repository becomes the package (pkg) publisher for downstream Solaris 11 deployments and updates on all Solaris 11 systems being managed by Ops Center.

Ops Center provides the ability to define Solaris 11 OS and Software Profiles comprised of Oracle Solaris 11 packages, user-supplied custom packages, scripts, and other files.  Such Software Profiles profiles can then be used to install and update software on systems already running Solaris 11 in a structured and consistent way.  Ops Center not only caches the main Oracle Solaris IPS repository, but more importantly it gives admins the ability to define their own preferred collection of packages so that systems can easily be kept in sync with each other, running a well-defined, life-cycle-managed Standard Operating Environment (SOE), instead of just whatever the latest content is at pkg.oracle.com.

Ops Center 12c also adds Solaris 11 features for bare-metal OS Provisioning, based on the Solaris 11 Auto Install (AI) facility.  Ops Center configures the Solaris 11 AI in a way that shields admins from needing to write custom AI manifests or custom "first boot" packages.  Solaris 11 deployments using Ops Center follow similar profile-based patterns as for Solaris 10 or Linux, all of which can all be deployed from the same Ops Center infrastructure running on Solaris 11.  The gory details of all these different times of bare-metal OS Provisioning are handled automatically for the user so that he or she does not need to put time and resources into manually creating and maintaining infrastructure for deploying different OS's natively -- Solaris 11 with AI, Solaris 10 JumpStart with JET, or Linux with Kickstart or AutoYast.  All of those OS's are handled by Ops Center under the covers, based on whatever network boot capability the OS requires (PXE/DHCP, WANBOOT, or AI), and all from the same Ops Center infrastructure running on Solaris 11.

Specific to Solaris 11 OS Provisioning (via AI), Ops Center provides its own "first-boot" package+scripts to customize the Solaris 11 deployment, and in particular this approach automatically installs the Ops Center agent.  With the Ops Center Agent in place right from the start, it is easy to handle post-install steps using the Ops Center features for handling Solaris 11 OS and Software Profiles containing additional packages, scripts, and content from the Solaris 11 Software Library, described above.

Tying bare-metal Solaris 11 deployment and post-install customization together is a key way that Ops Center simplifies the overall life-cycle management for Solaris 11 (in addition to Solaris 10 and Linux).   For example, a top-level plan based on "Configure and Install Logical Domains" can create numerous Logical Domains into an Oracle VM Server for SPARC "Server Pool" and provision Solaris 11 into each LDom Guest based on a powerful multi-step "Install Server" plan.  Such a plan can cover the end-to-end steps for installing and updating the OS, running scripts and adjusting monitoring parameters, etc.

Here is an example of the kinds of activities that can be performed in conjunction an OS Deployment, or separately, depending on the need:

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c Deployment Plan

NOTE: In the above example, the last step "Create Guests" can be used to create one or more Solaris Containers within the LDom Guest, rounding out the end-to-end deployment all the way from LDom Guest to Solaris 11 Global Zone to multiple Solaris Containers, if so desired.

One of the nicest aspect of deploying and managing Solaris 11 using Ops Center Plans and Profiles is that the same content can be applied as updates to existing Solaris 11 systems, aligned to the same content as chained off a bare-metal OS Provisioning.  It is up to the user which steps they want to include in a deployment plan -- whether they are updating Software Profiles on systems deployed 6 months ago to match the latest standard, or they are deploying new systems based on that same standard, Ops Center provides the means to insure that the outcome is consistent.

Here is an example of the kinds of activities that can be performed on an existing Solaris 11 OS -- either ad hoc, or immediately after a Solaris 11 OS Provisioning step, so that whether the life-cycle started with a new system, or the intent is to update a system deployed six months ago, the outcome can be the same:

S11 Update Multi-Step Plan

In short, Ops Center running on Solaris 11 can manage Solaris 10 and Linux systems, all from a common infrastructure, and all based on a simplified, consistent, profile- and plan-based way to do the OS and Software deployments and updates.  The net effect is an easy to use way to managing the life-cycle of heterogeneous systems, in a very consistent way through automation and re-use.

Please let us know what you think?  Until next time...
\Leon
--

Leon Shaner | Senior IT/Product Architect
Systems Management | Ops Center Engineering @ Oracle

The views expressed on this [blog; Web site] are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.



For more information, please go to Oracle Enterprise Manager  web page or  follow us at : 

Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Linkedin | Newsletter

Tuesday Apr 24, 2012

Demo Series : Gain Total Cloud Control of Systems with Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c

Earlier this month, at Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c launch, we published a series of demos of Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c  managing various Oracle solutions from applications to hardware . You could see all of those demos by clicking the graphic below.  Following the graphics below, I have a brief overview of an enterprise customer scenario and various demos highlighting the management of various systems .

Demo Series - Explore Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c

A Step-by-Step Journey to Enterprise Clouds

A large global financial company serving millions of customers worldwide has decided to investigate a private cloud infrastructure. They have multiple business units and are located in multiple regions worldwide.

Their enterprise applications include Oracle Siebel CRM, Oracle E-Business Suite Financials, and PeopleSoft HCM. They have recently added several Oracle Fusion Applications modules to enhance their CRM and HCM capabilities. Over time, they have also deployed a number of Java and web-based applications. They use Oracle Solaris/SPARC environments for their E-Business Suite applications. Their web servers, some of their application servers, and a number of the home grown applications run on Oracle Enterprise Linux and Oracle x86 servers. They have deployed Oracle virtualization solutions for x86 servers and SPARC.

This company is transitioning their IT to a private cloud environment to support the CEO’s new corporate strategy to increase operational efficiency by 10% while growing the top line by 30% in two years. The IT organization, led by their CIO, considered various options and concluded that achieving the CEO’s objectives would require them to transition their enterprise applications to the cloud, thereby creating real differentiation in how they service their customers. They reviewed several vendors and concluded that their private cloud solutions were adequate for small applications but too risky for enterprise applications. They decided to go with the an Oracle solution because only Oracle was able to demonstrate a proven solution to power enterprise applications while also leveraging SPARC and x86 virtualization for a complete cloud management solution.

They have already started to deploy Database-as-a-Service and Fusion Middleware-as-a-Service clouds using Oracle Enterprise Manger Self Service Application Portal. They plan to deploy Infrastructure-as-Service cloud based on both SPARC and x86 servers with Oracle virtualization solutions and manage them through Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center. They have recently deployed many ExaData systems. They are starting to deploy ExaLogic and Super Clusters Engineered systems as well to accelerate performance and time to market.

Integrated Linux Management in the Cloud

Linux Management functionality is available as part of Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c and is available to Oracle Linux Basic and Premier Support customers at no cost. The solution provides an integrated and cost-effective solution for complete Linux server lifecycle management and delivers comprehensive provisioning, patching, monitoring, and administration capabilities via a single, web-based user interface thus significantly reducing the complexity and cost associated with managing Linux operating system environments.

Using these rich Linux management features along with the complete Oracle Enterprise Manager product solution, the global financial company takes advantage of enterprise-scale service level management, automated change and configuration management, and comprehensive system and application performance management.

Integrated Lifecycle Management for Physical and Virtual Servers in the Cloud

Oracle VM offers server virtualization for both x86 and SPARC architectures that enable the deployment of agile cloud infrastructures. Virtualized server environments integrated with Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center allow you to easily create, deploy, clone virtual servers, and live migrate workloads while dynamically controlingcompute resources. Integrated lifecycle management of both physical & virtual servers with Ops Center simplifies the daily workflowneeded to control cloud infrastructures. This is one of the key reasons why this company decided power their private cloud with Oracle virtualization technologies.

Oracle Solaris 11 – The First Cloud OS

With its new and improved features, Oracle Solaris brings mission-critical enterprise class computing to cloud scale environments. These features include extremely agile, no overhead virtualization, simplified software lifecycle management, and built-in security across all layers. Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center understands all these new technologies, and therefore is the perfect tool to manage Oracle Solaris deployments at data center and cloud scales.

Manage Mission Critical Applications in the Cloud

Deploying and managing mission critical applications in cloud are one of the key strategic interests of the enterprises. Oracle SPARC based Infrastructure-as-a-Service ( IaaS ) offers the scale, reliability, and performance needed for those mission critical applications. In this demo, you will learn about how to manage SPARC server platforms, which is the foundation of the enterprise cloud this global financial company wants to deploy The Oracle SPARC technologies offers an extreme thread count and memory density in a small and eco-friendly form factor. This company wanted to insure they could leverage their existing SPARC population with not excluding new growth into the T4 chassis models. They found Ops Center offered them complete coverage of where they were the most invested.

Private PaaS and IaaS Cloud with Oracle Enterprise Manager

Oracle Enterprise Manager provides complete lifecycle management for cloud - from automated cloud setup, to delivery, to cloud operations. Learn how Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control 12c and Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c work together to provide an end-to-end solution to take you from zero to cloud in a day, whether the goal of your private cloud is Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) or Platform as a Service (PaaS).

Managing DBaaS and MWaaS Cloud Services Delivery with Oracle Enterprise Manager

This demo showcases Engineered Systems Management capabilities of Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control and Ops Center 12c. You can now manage all components of Oracle Exadata Database Machine, from databases to cell storage to network swicthes, from a single console. Similarly, you can now manage all aspects of Oracle Exalogic, including software and hardware, from a single console. Learn how Oracle Enterprise Manager is engineered systems-aware and provides insight into the performance, configuration and physical health of these highly performance machines.

Simplify Your Data Center with Exalogic Elastic Cloud

Oracle Exalogic Elastic Cloud is the industry’s Best Foundation for Cloud. It is hardware and software engineered together to provide extreme performance for Java applications, Oracle Applications, and other enterprise applications. Exalogic offers fully integrated compute nodes, storage and networking, fully integrated ZFS network attached storage appliance with 40TB of SAS disk storage, QDR InfiniBand IO Fabric, with 40 Gb/second throughput and microsecond latencies, Data center service network integration with 10 GbE, Scalable, open standard grid architecture. That means less effort spent by you on putting the pieces together and more time spend on extending the business value of your applications.

Check out this demonstration to learn more about Exalogic and the right configuration that meets your needs.

Oracle Software Runs Best on Oracle Hardware

Oracle Enterprise Manager offers the right amount of information across the stack, breaking down isolated IT organizations and helps make a stronger connection between the business services and the server assets they utilize.

To learn more, please go to Oracle Enterprise Manager  web page and stay connected with us at  :

Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Linkedin | Newsletter

Tuesday Apr 10, 2012

A new version of Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center Doctor (OCDoctor ) Utility released

In February,  we posted a blog of Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center Doctor aka OCDoctor Utility. This utility assists in various stages of the Ops Center deployment and can be a real life saver. It is updated on a regular basis with additional knowledge (similar to an antivirus subscription) to help you identify and resolve known issues or suggest ways to improve performance.

A new version ( Version 4.03 ) of the OCDoctor is now available . This new version adds full support for recently announced Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center 12c including prerequisites checks, troubleshoot tests, log collection, tuning and product metadata updates. In addition, it adds several bug fixes and enhancements to OCDoctor Utility.

To download OCDoctor for new installations:
https://updates.oracle.com/OCDoctor/OCDoctor-latest.zip

For existing installations, simply run:
# /var/opt/sun/xvm/OCDoctor/OCDoctor.sh --update

Tip : If you have Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center12c EC installed, your OCDoctor will automatically update overnight.

Stay connected with  Oracle Enterprise Manager   : 

Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Linkedin | Newsletter


Tuesday Mar 06, 2012

How to use Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center to patch your Solaris Systems ?

Oracle Enterprise Manager Ops Center allows you to update your Solaris systems with patches available from My Oracle Support (MOS).

Like always in life, there are multiple ways to perform a given task and the same is true for Ops Center.

Juergen Fleischer, Senior IT/Product Architect , Oracle Enterprise manager Ops center provided the content for this blog to guide you through different ways to perform Oracle Solaris patching depending on deployment scenarios.

Scenario 1 - Applying a single Patch to an Asset

Let's start with installing just a single patch to a system. To perform this task you would select the OS Asset and pick the action 'View/Modify Catalog' from the right hand side Actions panel.

From the pop-up screen, you can search for the patchid, see which revision is already installed and select a newer one if required.

Here is a MOS how-to document describing this in all detail:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=HOWTO&id=1390766.1


Scenario 2 - Applying multiple patches to several systems

If you have to apply a list of patches to multiple systems every now and then, creating an Update Profile would be the best method, as once you have created the Profile it can be used many times ensuring the exact same patches in the list are applied each and every time.

Update Profiles are located in the 'Plan Management' section. Update Profiles can be used in two ways: either you select a single or a group of OS assets and pick the action 'New Update OS Job'. Or, you pick the Update Profile in the Plan Management section and select 'New Update OS Job'. The wizard will allow you to select one or more target assets or groups.

Here is a MOS how-to with all the details:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=HOWTO&id=1390769.1

Scenario 3 - Regular Baseline Patching

For regular Baseline Patching 'Update Profiles' can be based on given patchsets which are made available by the Ops Center Knowledge Base (KB).

The KB offers two different patchsets, the monthly released Solaris Baselines (based on Oracle's internal EIS-DVD) and the current or archived versions of the "Recommended Patchset for Solaris". These are updated whenever a new critical patch gets released. Every quarter, one of these Recommended Patchsets for Solaris will be renamed as the 'Critical Patch Update' in line with standard Oracle practice. It's up to the Customer's patching policy and strategy to determine which patchsets should be used and how often they should be applied.

Scenario 4 - Latest & Greatest patchset

Finally, if required, Customers can select what is called "Latest & Greatest" patchset. These are all the latest available patches for all installed packages. To perform this task, use the 'Host Compliance Report' and tick the Security & Bug Fixes check box.

More details can be found in this blog entry
https://blogs.oracle.com/patch/entry/applying_the_latest_solaris_patches

or in this MOS how-to document:
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=HOWTO&id=1390785.1


So far, we have talked about various scenarios around applying a single patch or multiple patches.  These patches can be applied on a running system or by using LiveUpgrade (LU).  LU allows creating Alternate Boot Environment (ABE), Synchronizing boot environments, Patching the ABE and then Activating the ABE.
For detailed examples and howto examples:

https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=HOWTO&id=1390757.1
https://support.oracle.com/CSP/main/article?cmd=show&type=NOT&doctype=HOWTO&id=1390764.1


Before using LiveUpgrade, please verify that the latest LU-Patch (sparc: 121430, x86: 121431) is  installed on the running system.

Furthermore, when payching zones always make use of the parallel zone patching feature, independent if using LU or not. Following blog entry describes this very well :
https://blogs.oracle.com/patch/entry/zones_parallel_patching_versus_update

Stay Connected:
Twitter | Facebook | YouTube | Linkedin | Newsletter

Wednesday Oct 27, 2010

New IDC Podcast on Systems Management

[Read More]
About

Latest information and perspectives on Oracle Enterprise Manager.

Related Blogs




Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
3
5
6
7
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today