Thursday Mar 28, 2013

IOUG Webcast: Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Metrics Monitoring and Management Repository Views: Tips & Tricks

IOUG Oracle Enterprise Manager Special Interest Group (SIG)    presents webcast "Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Metrics Monitoring and Management Repository Views: Tips & Tricks".  Suzanne Strasser will be sharing he real-life experience with Oracle Enterprise Manager metrics monitoring and management.

Date : April 2nd, 2013
Time : 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CDT
Featured Speaker: Suzanne Strasser
Register herehttps://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/612927881

Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c provides a rich set of metrics for monitoring database health and alerting when problems are encountered. In this educational webcast we will demonstrate the steps needed to set up and customize metrics monitoring in EM to meet the needs of your business. We will also cover the use of management repository views to access historical metrics data for performing additional analyses and graphics presentation outside of EM. Join this webcast to learn how to:

• Identify and describe the steps needed to implement administration groups / template collection associations in order to customize monitoring requirements for various targets based on the needs of your business;

• Build queries using the EM management repository views to extract metric data for historical analysis, trending, and graphing; and

• Identify how EM uses rollup tables to summarize metric data on an hourly and daily basis.

Wednesday Mar 27, 2013

Using Advanced Notifications in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c

When using an enterprise monitoring tool such as Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, one of the most critical components is notification. Once an alert or issue has been identified, how do you tell the right people at the right time? Most enterprises use e-mail or open a trouble ticket. As you can imagine, no two enterprises are the same when it comes to their tools and processes. Many customers use one of the more common and well known trouble ticketing systems but quite a few use non-standard or custom (homegrown) trouble ticketing systems. Some customers have special routing requirements or corporate standards and have custom applications which handle all emailing functions instead of directly emailing using an SMTP server.

Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c can handle all of these situations by utilizing one of the various notification methods provided: E-mail, 3rd party connectors and advanced notification methods. There are three types of advanced notifications: SNMP, OS Command or PL/SQL. This blog will introduce you to the OS Command and PL/SQL notification methods available in EM 12c and provide an example of using a custom OS script for notifications.

[Read More]

Tuesday Mar 26, 2013

Get OPN certified on Oracle Enterprise Manager and other Oracle Technologies at Collaborate

A rare opportunity to get your OPN Certified Specialist credentials at the Collaborate 13 event and at times your staff is not in the booth! Register now.

At Collaborate 13, Oracle Partners have a unique opportunity to become Oracle Certified Specialists in their chosen Oracle solution area from exams available at the event site. Understanding there are times the Exhibit Hall is closed to your staff, special hours and an onsite location have been arranged to make it as easy as possible for OPN Partners to take advantage.

OPN certification differentiates Oracle Partners in the marketplace by providing a competitive edge through proven expertise. Earning these certifications will also contribute to increasing your company's level in the OPN Specialization Program. Oracle Specialized partners are recognized by Oracle, and preferred by customers. Make sure you check the exams available at the event site and register early as there is a limited number of FREE vouchers enabling partners to take exams at no charge.

This is an excellent way for Oracle partners already attending the Collaborate event or have staff exhibiting at Collaborate, to easily get away when the Exhibit Hall is closed and take the Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c exam 1Z0-457

Best of all is there are a limited number of FREE vouchers available, so the first partners to register and use them save $195 for each person that takes the exam. As you  have already invested in travel for staff to be at the event, why not get more out of that investment and take advantage while staff is already out of the office to get it done.

Friday Mar 22, 2013

Cookbook : Middleware as a Service using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c

Oracle's Middleware as a Service (MWaaS) solution for enterprise private cloud provides a complete application development and deployment environment. It includes a complete runtime environment comprised of all services necessary to deploy and run an enterprise-class application, including services such as application hosting, persistence store, application integration and APIs that enable programmatic access to additional computing services that might be required by an application. Identity services are an example of APIs available within a PaaS environment. MWaaS facilitates cheaper and faster deployment of applications as developers need not deal with the complexities of the underlying hardware and software components.

Oracle recently published a cookbook for Middleware as a Service using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c. This document explains the step-by-step instructions in provisioning a WebLogic domain using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c . These steps include:   

  • Security Configuration for Named Credentials, Roles and Accounts for Cloud Management
  • Using Out of Box WebLogic profiles shipped with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c R2
  • Customizing WebLogic domain creation procedures to your environment and business requirements
  • Setting up the Middleware Zones
  • Setting quota limits for each cloud management roles
  • Definition of Service Templates to be used for middleware domain creation
  • Configuring chargeback policies for your middleware cloud infrastructure


Friday Mar 15, 2013

Wipro Gets a Complete View of Its Enterprise IT in One Click

Using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, Wipro can see the entire IT stack of its managed services offering, from applications to Infrastructure layers.

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Thursday Mar 14, 2013

Database as a Service: Glad that you asked these!

Thanks for visiting my earlier blog post on the new Database as a Service (DBaaS) features which got released in Enterprise Manager 12cR2 Plugin Update 1.

Our first public webcast on  DBaaS since the release was held this morning (the recording will be soon available on O.com). The webcast was pretty well attended with peak attendance going well over our expectation. I wish we had more time to handle the technical Q&A, but since we didn't, let me use the blogosphere to answer some of the questions that were asked. I am repeating some of the questions that we answered during the webcast, because they warrant details beyond what the duration permitted.

Kevin from the audience asked "What's the difference between a regular provisioning and DbaaS?" Sometimes the apparently obvious ones are the most difficult to answer. The recently released whitepaper covers the regular/traditional provisioning versus DBaaS in detail. Long story cut short, in a traditional provisioning model, IT (usually a DBA) uses scripts and tools to provision databases on behalf of end users. In DBaaS IT's role changes and the DBA simply creates a service delivery platform for end users to provision databases on demand as and when they need them. And that too, with minimal inputs ! Here's how the process unfolds:

  • The DBA pools together a bunch of server resources that can host databases or a bunch of databases that can host schema and creates a Self-Service zone.
  • The DBA creates a gold image and provisioning procedure and expresses that as a service template
  • As a result, the end users do not have to deal with the intricacies of the provisioning process. They input a couple of very simple things like the service template and the zone and everything else happens under the hood. The provisioning process, the physicality of the database, etc are completely abstracted out.
  • And finally, because DbaaS deals with shared resource utilization and self-service automation, a DBaaS is usually complemented by quota, retirement and chargeback. 

The following picture can make it clear.


In terms of licensing, for a traditional administrator driven database provisioning, you need the Database Lifecycle Management Pack.  If you want to enable DBaaS on top of it, simply add the Cloud Management Pack for Database.

I will combine the next two questions. Alfred asked, "Is RAC a requirement?" (the short answer for which is "No") while Jud asked, "Is the schema-level provisioning supported in an environment where the target DBs are running in VMs?" First of all, in our DBaaS solution we support multiple models, as shown below.

In the dedicated database model, the database can run on a pool of servers or a pool of cluster. So both single instance and RAC are supported. Similarly, in the dedicated schema (Schema as a Service) model, it can run on single instance or RAC, which can in turn be hosted on physical servers or VMs. Enterprise Manager treats both physical servers and VMs as hosts and as long as the hosts have the agent installed, they can participate in DBaaS. Bottomline is that as we move from IaaS and offer these higher order services, the underlying infrastructure becomes irrelevant. This should also satisfy Steve, who queried "As the technology matures is there an attempt by Oracle to provide ODA vs EXADATA as the foundation of the dbaas to lower the cost?". The answer is YES. But, why wait?  DBaaS is supported on Exa and ODA platforms TODAY. In fact, HDFC Bank in India is running DBaaS on Exadata. You can read about them in the latest Oracle Magazine.

Another interesting question came from Yuri. He asked, "Is there an option to disable startup/shutdown for the self-service users?" It can be answered in multiple ways. First of all, in Schema as a Service or dedicated schema model, the end user cannot control the database instance state because it houses database services (schemas) owned by others too. So this may be a good model for enterprises trying to limit what end users can do at the database instance level.  However, in a dedicated database model, the Enterprise Manager out-of-box self-service console allows the end user to perform operations like startup and shutdown on the database instance. In general, if you want to create your tailored own self-service console with a limited set of operations exposed in the self-service interface, using the APIs may be the way to go. Enterprise Manager 12c also supports RESTFul APIs for self-service operations and hence a limited set of capabilities may be exposed. Check this technical presentation for the supported APIs.

Gordon's question precisely brings out the value of the Enterprise Manager 12c offering. He asked, "How do the services in the cloud get added to Cloud Control monitoring and alerting?" Ever since Amazon became the poster child of public IaaS, enterprises tried emulating their model within the data centers. What most people ignore or forget is that there is a life of the resources in a cloud beyond the provisioning process. Initial provisioning is just the beginning of that lifecycle. In Amazon's case, the management and monitoring of resources is the headache of Amazon's IT staff and consumers are oblivious to the time and effort it takes for them to manage the resources. In a private cloud scenario, one does not have that luxury. Once the database gets provisioned, it needs to monitored for performance, compliance and configuration drifts by company's own  IT staff. In Enterprise Manager 12c, the agent is deployed on the hosts that constitute the pool making the databases automatically managed without any additional work. It comprehensively manages the entire lifecycle and both adminsitrators and self-service users have tailored views of the databases. Well, this also gives me an opportunity to address a question by a participant who alluded to a 3rd party tool exclusively for database provisioning purposes. First of all, as I mentioned during the webcast, Enterprise Manager 12c is the only tool that handles all the use cases- creation of full databases, schemas and cloning (both full clone and Snap Clone) from a single management interface. The point tools out there handle only fraction of these use cases- some specialize in cloning while others specialize in seed database provisioning. Second, as stated in the previous answer, provisioning is only the initial phase of the lifecycle and a provisioning tool cannot be synonymous with a cloud management tool. Thanks Gordon for helping me make that point!

Sam and Cesar share the honors for the most difficult question that came right at the beginning. "Has it started?  Been on hold for a while." was their reaction at two minutes past ten. This is possibly the most embarrassing one for me because I was caught in traffic. With due apologies for that, I wish my car operated like Enterprise Manager's  Database as a Service!

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Tuesday Mar 12, 2013

Monitoring virtualization targets in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12C

Contributed by Sampanna Salunke, Principal Member of Technical Staff, Enterprise Manager

For monitoring any target instance in Oracle Enterprise Manager 12C, you would typically go to target home page, and click on the target menu to navigate to:

  • Monitoring->All Metrics page to view all the collected metrics
  • Monitoring->Metric and Collection Settings to set thresholds and/or modify collection frequencies of metrics
The thresholds and collection frequencies modified affect only the target instance that you are making changes to.

However, some of virtualization targets need to be monitored and managed differently due to changes made to the way data is collected and thresholds/collection frequencies are applied. Such target types include:

  • Oracle VM Server
  • Oracle VM Guest

As an optimization effort to minimize number of connections made to Oracle VM Manager to collect data for virtualization targets, the performance metrics for Oracle VM Server and Oracle VM Guest targets are “bulk-collected” at the Oracle VM Server Pool level. This means that thresholds and collection frequencies of Oracle VM Server and Oracle VM Guest metrics need to be set on the Oracle Server Pool that they belong to. For example, if a user wants to set thresholds on the “Oracle VM Server Load:CPU Utilization” metric for Oracle VM Server target, the sequence of steps to be performed are:

1. Navigate to the homepage of the Oracle VM Server Pool target that the Oracle VM Server target belongs to

2. Click on the target menu->Monitoring->Metric and Collection Settings


3. Expand the view option to “All Metrics” if required, and find the “Oracle VM Server Load” metric and change the thresholds or collection frequency of "CPU Utilization" as required.


Note that any changes made at the Oracle VM Server Pool for a “bulk collected” metric affect all the targets for which the metric is applicable in the server pool. In this example, since the user modified the “Oracle VM Server Load: CPU Utilization” threshold, the change is applied to all the Oracle VM Server targets in the server pool sg-pool1.

To summarize – the differences between “traditional” monitoring and “bulk-collected” monitoring is that the thresholds and collection frequencies of metrics are modified at the parent target, and the changes made are applied to all the children targets for which the metrics are applicable. However, data and alerts uploaded continue to appear as normal against the child target.

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WEBCAST: Delivering Database as a Service with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c


Thursday March 14
10:00 a.m. PST / 1:00 p.m. EST

Join us for a live Webcast to find out about the recently released Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c plug-ins that deliver new capabilities and support for managing database cloud services with schema as a service for extreme database consolidation and quick efficient database cloning through Snap Clone or RMAN Backups. These new capabilities provide an optimum utilization of development and database resources giving customers more flexibility and control during application development, leading to a faster time-to-market for delivering IT services.

Register Now!

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Download the Oracle Enterprise Manager Cloud Control12c Mobile app

Friday Mar 08, 2013

Schema as a Service for Extreme Consolidation

As we deal with Database as a Service use cases, we often find that consumers do not need dedicated databases of their own. Developers of a home-grown application, for example, might be satisfied with a logical slice of the database. This logical slice, leads us to the concept of Schema as a Service—a new capability offered in the latest release of Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Release 2 Plug-in Update 1.

Schema as a service is the ultimate and extreme in consolidating multiple schemas in a shared database model. Cloud users can request one or more schemas, with or without seed data, from Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c’s out-of-the-box self service portal. It offers excellent manageability, not only for its fast efficient provisioning, but because administrators only need to manage a small number of databases.


Schema as a Service: Consolidate Multiple Schemas in a Shared Database Cloud Services Model

However, consolidation comes at the expense of isolation, because the operating system and database are not isolated among the database consumers. While enabling Schema as a Service, it’s important to isolate the workloads as much as possible to make sure that one user doesn't run away with all the database resources. Administrators can guarantee this does not happen by using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c’s CPU monitoring capabilities built in to Oracle Database Resource Manager to maintain service levels.

For security, the more consolidated you get, the more concerns administrators have about data isolation and security. Using Oracle Data Vault can help resolve these issues. It is integrated with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c, and administrators can use Oracle Data Vault to enable fine grain control based on roles and privileges within the database cloud service.

For reporting purposes, metering and chargeback capabilities can be implemented to help IT organizations gain in-depth visibility into resource consumption and expenses incurred with each schema as a service deployment. This is useful for regulatory compliance requirements as well.

Schema as a Service at a Glance:

  • Consolidate multiple application schemas in a shared database deployment model
  • Each application user (i.e. developers or testers) can provision one or more database schema(s) with a dedicated database cloud service
  • Automated placement can be based on workload characteristics and specifications
  • Service levels are guaranteed through Oracle Database Resource Manager
  • Service governance is done through quotas, retirement policies and chargeback plans
  • Integrated with Oracle Data Vault for security isolation and control
  • De-provision schemas when needs change

Benefits:

  • Save resources through ultimate consolidation of multiple database applications
  • Boost administrator productivity and increase efficiency with automated provisioning
  • Deploy schema as a service implementations consistently using self-service profiles and templates
  • Metering and chargeback helps keep track of resource consumption and usage for accountability and reporting
  • Minimize administrative overhead and compliance challenges by preventing database sprawl

How To:
There are several steps involved when setting up and deploying database schema as a service in Oracle Enterprise Manager’s self service portal. Here is a quick summary of what’s involved. For more details be sure to review the resources below.

1. Setting up Platform as a Service Zones

  • Before deploying your schema as a service, you first need to create a Platform as a Service (PaaS) infrastructure using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c’s self-service portal. A PaaS Zone comprises multiple hosts, i.e. servers with Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c agent installed.
  • Use the portal to create a PaaS zone and organize it by function type (i.e. based on geography, line of business (sales, development) or application lifecycle. (i.e. dev, test, QA, production)
  • Next expose the PaaS zone to the self-service cloud users in the portal. For example, developers can now have the option to select a development PaaS zone or testers can select a QA zone.
  • Visibility of each zone can be restricted based on the self-service user's credentials.

2. Setting up Database Pools

  • Database pools are a collects of databases used to host schema as a service.
  • To create a new database pool, you can use a portion of resources that are available to the zone. Keep in mind that all members of the database pool need to be the same target type. For example, a single database instance or database cluster; platform, or same database version. This ensures provisioning consistency during deployment.
  • Next configure placement constraints and policies for the database pool. For placing databases within the pool and controlling how resources are utilization, you need to first create a placement constraint and set its policies. This provides protection for the database members within the pool for resource consumption. For example, a production database pool might enforce more conservative constraints whereas a development pool might allow liberal limits.
  • You can set a constraint for each database in the pool by services or by workload associated with the service request based on CPU and memory. You can also enable Oracle Database Resource Manager for the database pool to control your CPU usage and the underlying service levels.

3. Request Settings

  • During this part of the schema as a service set up, future reservations, archive retention and duration of request can all be enabled.

4. Quotas

  • Controlling quotas and setting limits for users based on role level can be assigned in this step of the process. Oracle Enterprise Manager supports quota based on CPU, memory and number of database services.

5. Profiles and Service Templates

  • A service template is standardized definition that is offered to self-service users to create a database or schemas within the deployment. A service template defines the workload characteristics and schema details that can be generated with or without seed data.
  • To create a service template with seed data, you need to create a profile. A profile is an entity that captures source database information for provisioning purposes. Once you create your service template it becomes part of a collection which makes up the service catalog. This catalog is then exposed to cloud users in the self-service portal.
  • Next, you can either export the seed data from the source database or export the schema definitions without the data. Once you decide, a Data Pump Export job will be created.
  • You can now map your newly created profile and service templates to the required zone(s) and database pools.

6. Chargeback

  • The final step in deploying schema as a service is to configure resource metering and chargeback.
  • Setting up metering and chargeback can easily be done in order to track resource usage within the schema as a service implementation.
  • For more information on how to set up chargeback we recommend reading this white paper.

LEARN MORE:

Product Info:
  • Oracle Cloud Management
  • Zero to Cloud Resource Center
  • Demos:
  • Oracle Cloud Management
  • Setting up Database Clouds for Schema as a Service
  • Whitepapers:
  • Delivering Database as a Service using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c
  • Best Practices for Database Consolidation in Private Clouds
  • Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c: Metering and Chargeback
  • Cloud Management for Oracle Database

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    Wednesday Mar 06, 2013

    Snap Clone: Instant, self-serviced database-on-demand

    Snap Clone: Introduction
    Oracle just released Enterprise Manager 12c Release 2 plugin Update 1 in February, 2013. This release has several new cloud management features that, such as Schema as a Service and Snap Clone. While the relevance of Schema as a Service is in the context of new database services, Snap Clone is useful in performing functional testing on pre-existing data.

    One big consumer group of cloud is QA Engineers or Testers. They perform User Acceptance Tests (UAT) for various applications. To perform an UAT, they need to create copies of the production database. For intense testing, such as in pre-upgrade scenarios, they need a full updateable copy of the production data. There are other situations, such as in functional testing, they need to perform minimal updates to the data, but at the same time, need multiple functional copies. Enterprise Manager 12c supports both the scenarios. In the former case, it leverages RMAN backups to clone the data. In the latter case, it leverages the “Copy on Write” technology at the storage layer to perform Enterprise Manager 12c Snap Clone (or just Snap Clone). Currently, NAS technologies viz. Netapp and ZFS Storage Appliance are supported for Snap Clone. By using this technology, the entire data does not need to be cloned, but the new database can physically point to the source blocks within the same filer and only needs to allocate new blocks if there are updates to the cloned copy.

    Underlying “Copy on Write” technology
    To cover the underlying technology, let us look at the Netapp  and Sun ZFS storage technologies. First of all, Netapp supports pooling of storage resources and creating volumes on top of those. These volumes are called Flexvols. NetApp FlexClone technology enables true data cloning - instant replication of the Flexvols without requiring additional storage space at the time of creation.  Each cloned volume is a transparent, virtual copy that can be used for a wide range of operations such as product/system development testing, bug fixing, upgrade checks, data set simulations, etc. FlexClone volumes have all the capabilities of a FlexVol volume, including growing, shrinking, and being the source of a snapshot copy or even another FlexClone volume. Data ONTAP makes it happen by Copy on Write technology. When a volume is cloned, ONTAP does not allocate any new physical space but simply updates the metadata to point to the old blocks of the parent volume. NetApp filers use a Write Anywhere File Layout (WAFL) to manage disk storage. When a file is changed, the snapshot copy still points to the disk blocks where the file existed before it was modified, and only the changes (deltas) are written to new disk blocks. A block in WAFL currently can have a maximum of 255 pointers to it. This means that a single FlexVol volume can be cloned upto 255 times. All the metadata updates are just pointer changes, and the filer takes advantage of locality of reference, NVRAM, and RAID technology to keep everything fast and reliable. I found this documentation on the Netapp site specially useful to understand the concept. The following picture provides a graphical illustration of how this works.



    Oracle  ZFS employs a similar copy-on-write methodology that creates clones that point to the source block of data. When one needs to modify the block, data is never overwritten in place. Oracle Solaris ZFS then creates new pointers to the new data and a new master block (uberblock) that points to the modified data tree. Only then does it move to using the new uberblock and tree. In addition to providing data integrity, having new and previous versions of the data on disk allows for services such as snapshots to be implemented very efficiently.

    The best way to think of storage snapshots is that it is a point-in-time view of the data. It’s a time machine, letting you look into the past. Because it’s all just pointers, you can actually look at the snapshot as if it was the active filesystem. It’s read-only, because you can’t change the past, but you can actually look at it and read the data. NetApp and SunZFS snapshots just write the new information to a special bit of disk reserved for storing these changes, called the SnapReserve. Then, the pointers that tell the system where to find the data get updated to point to the new data in the SnapReserve.

    Space efficiency: Since we are only recording the deltas, you get the disk savings of copy-on-write snapshots (typically a few hundred kilobytes for a 1 terabyte database).

    Time efficiency: Because the snapshot is just pointers, to restore data (using SnapRestore), we simply update the pointers to point to the original data again. This is faster than copying all the data back. So taking a snapshot completes in seconds, even for really large volumes (like, terabytes) and so do restores. A typical terabyte database therefore takes only a couple of minutes to clone, backup and restore.

    So, what is the additional benefit of Enterprise Manager Snap Clone over storage level cloning?

    Snap Clone is complementary to the copy-on-write technologies described above. It leverages the technologies mentioned above;  however it provides additional value in:

    1. Automated registration and association with Test Master database: Registering the storage with Enterprise Manager in context of the Test Master database. For example, it queries the filer to find the storage volumes and then associates those with the volumes that the datafiles are associated with. It provides granular control to the admins to make a database clonable, since there could be databases that DBAs do not want cloned off.
    2. Database as a Service using a self-service paradigm: Provides a self-service user (typically a functional tester) to provision a clone based on the Test Master. The self-service capability has administrator side feature like setting up the pool of servers which will host the databases, creating a zone, creating service templates for provisioning and setting access controls for the users both at the zone level and the service template level.
    3. Time travel: Functional testers often need to go back to an earlier incarnation of a database. Enterprise Manager provides the self service users to take multiple snapshots of the database as backups. The users can then easily restore from an earlier snapshot. Since the snapshot is only a thin copy, the backup and restore are almost instantaneous, typically a couple of minutes. During restore a large part of that is spent in actually starting the database, for example and discovering its state in Enterprise manager and not in the actual restore.
    4. Manageability: Finally, Enterprise Manager provides the complete manageability of these clones. This includes performance management, lifecycle management, etc. For example, when cloning at a storage volume level, sysadmin tools have little idea on the databases and applications that are consuming those volumes. From an inventory management, capacity planning and compliance it is important to track the storage association and lineage of the clones at the database level. Enterprise Manager provides that rich set of manageability features.


    So how does this work in Enterprise Manager 12c?

    In order to understand the Snap Clone feature of Enterprise Manager and its relevance to DBaaS, it is important to understand the sequence of steps that enable the feature and the DbaaS.


    Step 1: Setting up the DbaaS Pool
    First of all the Sysadmin has to designate few servers (which become Enterprise Manager hosts when the agent is deployed on them) to constitute the PaaS Infrastructure Zone. Each of these servers should have the connectivity to be able to mount the volumes participating in the Snap Clone process.

    The DBA intrinsically knows the exact versions and flavor of databases being used within each LoB along with the operating system version compatibility. As the next level of streamlining he/she can add each unique type of the database configuration to a single place called Pool. For example, single Instance 11.1.0.7, cluster database 11.2.0.2 …etc.

    A database pool contains a set of homogeneous resources that can be used to provision a database instance within a PaaS Infrastructure Zone. For Snap Clone in particular, the administrator needs to pre-provision the same version of Oracle Homes either on standalone hosts or in a RAC cluster, which should be a part of the PaaS Infrastructure Zone.


    Step 2: Setting up the Test Master
    In the first step the administrator has to set up a Test Master as a clone of the production. Sometimes, the administrator has to create another copy of production at the source itself for masking and subsetting. The solution would vary depending on the customer's specific need and infrastructure. One can use one of RMAN, Dataguard, Golden Gate or even storage technologies such as Netapp Snapmirror, but usually our customers have figured out one way or other to do it. If the customer wishes to use EM for this, they can also use the Database Clone feature to clone the data (this leverages RMAN behind the scenes) or even use data synchronization feature of the Change Manager (part of Database Lifecycle Management Pack) to keep production and Test Master consistent. There is no unique way of accomplishing this; it all depends on the specific use case. There can be cases where the customer may need to mask or subset the data at source for which they can use those EM features as well.



    The test master has to be created on ZFS Storage Appliance or Netapp Filer. Currently, the versions supported are:
    ·    ZFS Storage Appliance models  7410 and 7420
    ·    Any Netapp storage model where Version ONTAP® 7.2.1.1P1D18 or above of Netapp is supported.  The Netapp interoperability matrix is available here

    Here’s a sample of database files on a Netapp filer that could constitute the Test Master database.
    ·    /vol/oradata (datafiles and indexes): [8-16 luns]
    ·    /vol/oralog (redologs only): [2-4 luns]
    ·    /vol/orarch  (archived redo logs ):[2-4 luns]
    ·    /vol/controlfiles (small vol for controlfiles):[2-4 luns]
    ·    /vol/oratemp (temp tablespace):[4-8 luns]

    Step 3: Register the storage and designate the Test Master
    Once the Test Master database has been created, one has to
    1.    Discover the Test Master database as an EM target
    2.    Register the storage with Enterprise Manager. Enterprise Manager uses an agent installed on Linux x86-64 bit to communicate with the filer. For NetApp storage, the connection is over http or https. For Sun ZFS storage, the connection is over ssh.

     Enterprise Manager associates a database with a filer by deriving the volumes  from the data files and then associating the volumes with those seen by the filer. For a database to participate in Snap Clone, it should be wholly located on flexvols or shares with Copy on Write enabled. Enterprise Manager performs the necessary validations for that.

    Step 4: Creating the service template using the Profile
    Finally, the Test Master needs to be exposed as a source of cloning to functional clones to self-service users. This is done by creating a provisioning profile. Provisioning Profile, in general, is an Enterprise Manager concept that denotes a gold image-whether in the form of a “tarball” archive or an RMAN backup or a Test Master.  The concept of profile makes the process repeatable by several users, such as QA testing different parts of the application.

    The profile is exposed to the service catalog via a service template which also includes the provisioning procedure, pre and post scripts for deploying the image.

    Finally, comes the user side experience
    . Enterprise Manager supports a self-service model where users can provision databases without being gated by DBA. The self-service user can pick a service template (which indirectly via the provisioning profile links to the Test Master) , specify the zone where to deploy and the database gets provisioned.  This new database is actually a "thin clone" of the Test Master and new blocks will get allocated only when the data is updated. The user can also take backup the cloned database, which are essentially read-only snapshots of the database. If the user needs to restore the database the latest incarnation of the database is simply pointed to the snapshot, so that the restore is instantaneous. This literally enables the self-service user to go back in time, in a "time travel" fashion. In addition to provisioning and backup, self-service users can also monitor the databases-check their statuses, look at session statistics, etc.



    Before concluding this blog entry, let me point to a bunch of collateral related to DBaaS that we recently published. Check out the new whitepaper, demos, and presentation. We will soon publish a technical whitepaper on performing E-Business Suite testing using Snap Clone. Till then...

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    Tuesday Mar 05, 2013

    Webcast: New Cloud Management Plug-Ins Provide Enhanced Capabilities for Deploying and Managing Clouds


    Thursday March 7
    10:00 a.m. PST / 1:00 p.m. EST

    Join us for this presentation to learn about Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c's recent release of new and updated Management Plug-ins that provide optimum utilization of compute resources, ultimately leading to faster time-to-market for IT services delivery. In addition to providing enhanced cloud management support, the Plug-ins extend Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c's capabilities for Database as a Service (DBaaS) and Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas), as well as introduce new features for Testing as a Service (TaaS).

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    Friday Mar 01, 2013

    Oracle's TaaS: Spend More Time Testing (and Less on the Other Stuff)

    Recently we asked a group of testers what percentage of their testing time was spent on peripheral activities such as: 
    • procuring hardware  
    • deploying the application under test  
    • deploying a test tool  
    • find/detect/log issues/bugs  and/or 
    • patching an application
    Two thirds of those testers indicated they spent between 40% to 70% of their time on these peripheral activities. 

    When asked what the right solution could be to solve that enormous time consumption, the majority selected testing cloud solutions that combine capabilities for Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and Software as a Service. Let's look at each one :

    Infrastructure as a Service ( IaaS ) based testing cloud : This solution is typically based on provisioning of virtual machines on provided infrastructure . This will only resolve the provisioning of applications under test and test tools which is only 10-15% of the total solution.

  • Software as a Service ( SaaS ) based testing cloud : This is Software ( for test automation ) as a service solution. This only addresses the test execution and ( possibly ) issue/bottleneck identification. It does not offer provisioning for applications under test . In many cases, it does not offer monitoring of internal applications.

  • The brand new Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c Testing as a Service (TaaS) solution (.pdf) offers that combination and helps software development and QA organizations to spend more time on actual testing and less on peripheral activities, while significantly enhancing testing efficiency and reducing the duration of testing projects.


    Oracle's TaaS is a platform for delivering automated application testing services. It is a self-service solution designed for private clouds that orchestrates the testing process end-to-end by: 
    • Automating the provisioning of test labs including application under test and test tools. 
    • Executing load and/or functional test scripts against the application. 
    • Providing rich application monitoring and diagnostics data for analysis.
    • Sophisticated chargeback facility for metering and charging the usage of the testing cloud by end-users. 
    It's built with semantic understanding of testing artifacts like testing tools, applications, test scripts, it is not just VMs.

    All this information and more was discussed in a recent webcast we ran in cooperation with the online StickyMinds.com community. We uploaded the replay on Youtube for you to watch at your convenience.



    Happy testing!

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