The power of pfexec

I recently got a comment on a blog entry I did a while back that explains setting up a multiboot system. The comment was from Peter Jones and he was having trouble editing the menu.lst file.  He had apparently overlooked the exact syntax that I had specified:

pfexec gedit /rpool/boot/grub/menu.lst

From the content of the comment, it appears the problem was that he did not specify pfexec, so he was unable to save changes to the file. 

That got me to thinking about how frequently in these blog entries we use pfexec, and we have never posted a detailed explanation of what it does and why it works. So I made a note to write a blog entry on that topic. 

I was about to write it up when I noticed that Joerg Moellenkamp has recently published a blog entry that pretty much says exactly what I was going to write; check it out at Less known Solaris features: pfexec. In particular, make note of the part at the end where he describes how by default, the userid you create during installation of OpenSolaris 2008.05 has the all-powerful Primary Administrator rights profile assigned to it.

Comments:

Hi,

Thanks for the note. Indeed, I use pfexec a lot (in lieu of the good ole "sudo" or "su" on my other \*nix boxes) and as long as you know what you are doing, it's a great feature.

Posted by Jean-Claude Vandonghen on September 22, 2008 at 09:33 AM GMT #

I prefer "vi"...

ps. I'm from Eastern Europe too))

Posted by Andrey on December 06, 2008 at 05:09 PM GMT #

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