Friday Apr 17, 2009

Professor David Cheriton at Open HA Cluster Summit on May 31

I'm excited that Professor David Cheriton has agreed to give the keynote address at the Open HA Cluster summit on May 31. Dr. Cheriton has an impressive resume in both academia and industry, and his lecture should be quite interesting. I can testify from personal experience that Dr. Cheriton is an entertaining speaker, as I took CS244b (Distributed Systems) from him as a grad student. This was my first exposure to distributed systems, and I've been in the field ever since.

The summit is free and open to anyone. It falls on the Sunday directly before CommunityOne and JavaOne, so if you're planning to attend those conferences, come a day early and check out this one. There will be free food, and the first 10 students to arrive at the conference, bright and early at 8:45 AM, will be able to participate in a drawing for a nano-iPod. Later at the evening reception we will be giving away a Toshiba Portege laptop. You can register on the summit wiki.

Thursday Jul 05, 2007

Recent Reads

In this holiday week in the US, here's a list of the fiction I've read in the past couple months.


  • Hunting Badger by Tony Hillerman -- Typical Hillerman; a good quick read.

  • Moral Disorder by Margaret Atwood -- I usually like Margaret Atwood's work, but this collection of short stories didn't do much for me.

  • Summerland by Michael Chabon -- My first exposure to Chabon's novels. This fantasy story was interesting, but didn't grab me the same way as other fantasy books I've read. I'll withold judgement on Chabon until I've tried some of his other novels ("The Mysteries of Pittsburgh" is up next).

  • Oblivion by David Foster Wallace -- David Foster Wallace is certainly unique. His writing is quite dense, and for the first time in quite a while I found myself needing to look up vocabularly words in a dictionary while reading fiction. Of the eight stories in the book, I enjoyed about three of them. I'd like to try one of his novels at some point, but maybe not immediately.

  • Walk Two Moons by Sharon Creech -- this novel for kids was quite well-written and enjoyable.

  • The Rule of Four by Ian Caldwell and Dustin Thomason -- I wasn't impressed with this best-seller. The concept was interesting, but the characters didn't strike me as believable or well-developed.

  • The Adventures of Augie March by Saul Bellow -- It took about 100 pages to get into, but after that the story carried me along.

  • Next by Michael Crichton -- (in progress)

About

Nick Solter is a software engineer and author living in Colorado.

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