Sometimes it is the Obvious Things...

Slight tangent, but still on the efficiency theme. Last year, I was doing some work with a large Internet retailer, and came across a few epiphanies that apply to these monologues.

We were addressing storage, with a view toward a "private storage cloud" as the intended goal. This customer was very forward-thinking in much of their environment, with excellent processes in place for most of their IT environment. Some pieces seemed to be stuck in the 90's though, and were based on "traditional operating practices" rather than the realities of their business.

Simple example: What happens when the table spaces of your database are running out of room? Traditionally (and in this customer's environment), a monitoring agent on the server sent an alarm to the service desk, and opened a trouble ticket. The ticket was then assigned (by hand) to one of the DBA's, who could go into the database management interface and "add tablespace" using some available disk space. What happens when you run out of available disk space? A trouble ticket is opened for the storage group to allocate another chunk of storage to the system. What happens when the storage array starts running short of available chunks? A trouble ticket is opened for the manager of the storage group to either add capacity through a "Capacity on Demand" contract, order an upgrade, or purchase an additional storage array.

What's wrong with this picture? Nothing according to the classic flow of IT management. In reality, there are way too many people doing manual processes in this flow. Simple business question: If the system taking orders from your customers is running out of tablespace to store the orders, are you really ever going to say no to adding more disk space? No? Then why do we have a series of binary decisions and checkpoints on the way to satisfying the demand?

Automation and self-service are key components of the cloud "ilities", but can also stand alone as an efficiency play in almost every IT environment. We often execute traditional processes and practices rather than mapping the real business needs and constraints against the technology capabilities. In this example, a few scripts to automate adding tablespaces, creating new tablespaces, adding filesystems, adding and assigning storage chunks, and pre-provisioning those storage chunks in a standardized fashion saved countless hours of human intervention. Each of those activities is simple and repeatable, and the scripting reduces the opportunities for error. Throw in informational alerts to the interested parties, instead of trouble tickets requiring action, and the efficiency of this little piece of the puzzle is greatly improved.

Some parts do remain mostly "traditional", such as the procurement of new storage assets, but even those business functions are streamlined as part of this evolution. Once IT realizes that the business needs follow a predictable pattern of simple actions and reactions, automation becomes a simple task. After all, what Internet retailer wants a potential customer to click on the "check out now" button and get some weird error message because of a storage shortage, when they just spent an hour filling the cart with all of those items that they need? It isn't just a lost transaction, it could be a lost customer.

Well, back to my day job for now.


bill.


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