Friday Mar 02, 2012

Interaction 12 - Critique

I’ve summarized my highlights of Interaction 12 already on this blog: Day 1 / Day 2 / Day 3

And there are many more, hidden between the tracks. It is an open secret that the interesting stuff happens in the breaks. Meet and greet with long-time-not-seen’s, meeting virtual friends for the first time in RL, and getting in touch with other interaction designers around the world. To that extend, IxD12 was very good.

But I want to bring some light to the dark corners as well. The opening party took place at the Trinity College in the center of Dublin. A wonderful location. I’ve never been so close to the Book of Kells, but this is another story. – What do you expect from a welcome party? To be welcomed. To say Hello to friends. To talk about the first day of workshops. etc. But you I do not expect a long series of presentations on the first evening already. This was an unfortunate attempt to pick up speed and get us me into the mood for the upcoming three days. Have just a party, or do a Pecha Kucha when the audience is I am open to pay attention. All of the presenters would have deserved a better setting.

My second point of crit concerns the main three days of the event: It was a professional conference. Hugh? Yes, for my taste it was too slick. After all those years we are still a young profession. And that could have been better represented with a little more spontaneity, or unconference feeling. For some time I want to write about the idea of a conference experience. You can design conferences much like you can do with tools and software. Just imagine that your app runs for three days (in fact it runs much longer if you include the pre- and post-conference activities, and the twitter stream is still active with all the redux events) and that you have 700 simultaneous users. Live. It is much more like theater or circus.
Then, why do you let the Conference Center choose the music between the talks? Why do you not have some interactive game or art installations during the breaks? Why don’t you encourage (more) Q&A? The audience felt rather tired or uninspired to me. No debates at all. Hey, we do not meet that often. What was going on? Where is the energy in our field?

I should mention –my third point– that I gave up during the 10 minutes short talk sessions. I understand the idea that you want to give as much air time to as many presenters as possible. But the pulsing of 10 minutes talk - 5 minutes nothing or switching between sessions - 10 minutes high - 5 minutes low - etc. was not in synch with my bio-rhythm of attention. Now I would have appreciated the fast paced short talks from the opening party, w/o the 5 minutes breaks of course.

Dear Organizers,
please take my opinion as constructive feedback. I’ve been in your role a few times before. You’ve done a tremendous job to get all this together. But maybe future or other conferences can benefit from my impressions.

cheers, and memorizing the highlights of IxD12 once again.

Wednesday Nov 30, 2011

One Year Oracle SocialChat - The Movie

You’ve just watched – hopefully – my first short movie. Thank you! Here is a bit of the back stage story.

About 6 weeks ago colleagues from SNBC (Social Network and Business Collaboration) announced a Social Use Case Competition. It was expected to submit a video of 2 to 5 minutes duration on the Social Enterprise (our internal phrase for Enterprise 2.0). Hmm – I had a few vague ideas, but no script – no actors – no experience in film making. Really the best conditions to try something!

I chose our weekly SocialChats as my main topic. But if you don’t do Danish Dogma cinema, you still need a script. Hence I played around with the SocialChat’s archive, and all of a sudden a script and even the actors appeared in front of me. The words that you have just seen are weekly topics. Slightly abridged and rearranged to form a story.

Exciting, next phase. How to get it on digital celluloid? I have to confess I am still impressed by epic. (Keep in mind, epic was done in 2004.) And my actors – words – call for a typographic style already. The main part was done over a weekend with Apple Keynote. And I even found a wonderful matching soundtrack among my albums: Didge Goes World by Delago. I picked parts of Second Day and Seventh Day. Literally, the rhythm was set, and I "just" had to complete the movie. Tools used – apart from trial and error: Keynote, Pixelmator, GarageBand, iMovie.

Finally I want to mention that I am extremely thankful to BSC Music for granting permissions to use the tracks for this short film! Without this sound it would have been just an ordinary slide show.

Monday Dec 20, 2010

Sun Founders Panel 2006

I was a little concerned when I realized that a video has vanished from a Computer History Museum's page at the time when Sun's website was reorganized during the transition to Oracle. It was an intriguing panel with Sun founders and pioneers Andy Bechtolsheim, Bill Joy, Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy, and John Gage. Ironically I remember the quote

"Get them on tape before they die."

And if you have them on tape, keep the video up regardless of any changing situations; you are a museum! But here is the good news (thanks Oliver): The webcast is still available on YouTube. Enjoy!

Some quotes at A Tribute to Sun Miscrosystems: A Night to Remember

sun systemnews Jan 4, 2011:

Redundancy is sometimes the salvation of technology. Certainly in the case involving the supposed holdings of the Computer History Museum, without redundancy and YouTube, the Sun Microsystems Founders Panel (Bill Joy, Andy Bechtolsheim, Vinod Khosla, Scott McNealy and moderator John Gage) would have vanished forever since the video disappeared mysteriously from the museum's web site during the confusion around the reorganization reflecting Oracle's acquisition of Sun. Now, in all their glory, the founding four, courtesy of YouTube, share their personal stories of the early days at Sun.

Tuesday Aug 10, 2010

SocialChat: Giving Back to the Community

Big companies feel the urge to give something back to the community. They support local and social activities with employee's time and know-how. Oracle is no exception. Here are once again my contributions to our weekly SocialChat. You know the game. Read bottom up:

  • Famous last words: Share your shit! -- Evening Talk by Tor Nørretranders at reboot11 (video)
  • If you mention your company name along the lines: even better!
  • But since you get something back personally -- trust, friends, reputation – it is worth every minute.
  • If you want to support your community the effort is much higher.
  • 1day/year doesn't change anything. And I doubt that it is even effective due to the management overhead.
  • Even better: Do good stuff and let others talk, blog and tweet about it.
  • My mantra: Do good stuff and talk about it. Rephrased today as: Do good stuff and blog about it.
  • What about organizing un-conferences? Think TED. Or http://raumschiffer.de/
  • I mean I do not even mow my own lawn. Why do it at the kindergarden next door?
  • What about building and managing online communities? e.g. the UX Forum at Xing
  • If I am running a local non-profit designers group, does it count as an Oracle supported volunteer project? http://uxhh.de
  • …or align our individual forces and abilities on less but larger projects.
  • If you want to make a difference you have to commit more time on the project, …
  • …rather limited. It is important but the impact on the local community and the benefits for the company is low.
  • I am really struggling with today's topic. I see the value of individuals spending a number of days on scattered social projects as...
  • Some of my OraTweets from the SocialChat #6 on "Giving back to the Community"…

Friday Nov 20, 2009

Social Enterprise Tools. Beipiel Sun.

Hier die Folien und einige Referenzen zu meinem Abschlussvortrag der Swiss Intranet Summit 09 in Zürich. – Jetzt auch als Webcast!

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