Friday Aug 08, 2008

Meet Beijing Skrocki!


Some of you may have read my post on Operation Frog Egg Relocation. Please meet Beijing Skrocki!

I'd like to say that Beijing is a symbol of the relocation program being a success, but as it turns out, Beijing was one of the few (if not only) eggs left in the koi pond that escaped the menu of Big Tuna (my big, sweet, hungry koi) and my OCD pond vacuuming. So, our little 8/8/08 froggie is indeed lucky! :-)

As for the relocated eggs, they are still doing well as tadpoles, but their road to becoming frogs is much slower than Beijing's. In fact, I'm beginning to worry about their slow progress -- winter will be here soon enough.

Sunday Aug 03, 2008

Dragonfly

Every now and then I catch a lucky shot with my rookie Canon PowerShot SD750 (a crowd-sourced recommendation that I totally appreciate!). This welcomed beauty was just visiting my pond -- s/he gets bonus points for having an appetite for mosquitoes.

Thursday Jun 19, 2008

Koi Pond and Frog Eggs Relocation Program

In my spare time, I'm a novice koi pond hobbyist. Which as it turns out, involves a whole lot more education than what I had originally expected when you factor in managing levels of acidity/alkalinity, ammonia, salt, nitrates, chlorine, etc. Bundle that with the required armchair koi vet degree and quarantine environment that you'll need to respond to infections and injury (on top of knowing the types of koi by their proper names, pond filtration equipment, predator control, the types of plants that will be compatible with the pond ecosystem, etc.) and it gets...complicated, but still fun.

This week's lesson-in-progress is how uninvited guests in the form of amorous amphibians one day, can turn into thousands of frog eggs the next day. At first glance the rope of eggs looked much like a cluster of plant roots, but after closer examination, it's clear that they are frog eggs. The koi managed to eat the majority of them before I had time to relocate them to a small water feature we have in the yard (pictured in this post). Now, we wait and see if tad poles will develop -- I understand that it takes a week or more.

I opted to intervene with a relocation because they are native to the area and offer value in the form of insect and slug control -- which our garden and mini fruit orchard will appreciate. Tho' some argue that frogs can introduce adverse conditions to a koi pond in the form of unfriendly bacteria or parasites. My pond has a UV filter that helps to manage bacteria, but it won't kill parasites. I've yet to experience a parasitic infestation, so I know little about responding to and managing one.

My frog-loving 6 year old nephew will be visiting for a couple weeks in about 10 days, so I'm hoping the timing will be right for him to observe the emergence of tadpoles...assuming a higher-ranking creature doesn't discover their hide-out.

Update (June 21): Tadpoles emerged today: http://flickr.com/photos/lskrocki/2597620655/
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Sr. Community Engineering Program Manager/Acting Director for Sun's external social networking sites (blogs, forums, wikis, etc.). Skrocki's personal blog, LinkedIn.

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