Solaris, MacBook and Parallels

I recently switched from Ferrari 3400 laptop to MacBook Pro. After I got familiar with Mac OS X (one of the first tasks was to find Terminal ;-) ) I started to play with Parallels Desktop for Mac in order to be able to install Solaris.

Parallels is easy to install but there is not actually too much information at their web site how to set up the virtual machine for Solaris installation. After a some searching I found very useful blog entry Getting Solaris 10 working in Paralles by Martin MC Brown. I did not use Solaris 10 but Solaris Express Community Edition (SXCE, Nevada, build 68). The virtual machine has the following parameters:

OS TypeSolaris
OS VersionSolaris 10
Main memory1024 MB
Video memory16 MB
1 x HDD, size25600 MB
1 x CD/DVD ROMImage file with SXCE image
2 x Serial portEmulation / Use output file
Network adapterBridged Ethernet / Default Adapter

Set Options/Booting/Boot Sequence to boot from CD-ROM at first and the SXDE installation can start. I choose the "Solaris Express" option at the begin because I wanted to use this machine to compile ON/Nevada from the sources later on (Solaris Express Developer Edition installs Sun Studio 12 while Sun Studio 11 is recommended for building ON/Nevada).

The installation went on without any problems. The only thing to really decide was the slice layout. I used a simple one -- slice 0 for /, slice 1 for swap, slice 2 is the overlay, and slice 3 for /data).

When the Solaris Express booted first time I logged as a root using Failsafe Session and created /root directory and set it as home directory for the super user (edit the file /etc/passwd. This way all the Gnome stuff generated for root goes to the /root directory and /does not get polluted.

The next step was to install driver for the Realtek 8029(AS) network adapter provided by the Parallels virtual machine. As Martin MC Brown's blog says, the driver is located on vmtools.iso CD image located inside /Library/Parallels/Tools directory. So, I shut down the Solaris Express, stopped the virtual machine, set the vmtools.iso at the CD/DVD-ROM Options/Image File, and booted the Solaris Express again.

The vmtools.iso gets automatically mounted and inside /media/PRTOOLS/Drivers/Network/RTL8029/SOLARIS is located device driver for the Realtek network adapter. I installed the driver using the network.sh script and choose to get the IP address using DHCP. After another reboot I get assigned DHCP address from my home DHCP server and another (virtual) machine appeared on the network!

After getting the network up an running I set up ZFS pool. I used slice 3 (/dev/dsk/c0d0s3), which was originally mounted as UFS file system (under /data in my case). Here are the steps to convert this slice to ZFS pool:

  • umount /data
  • Edit /etc/vfstab and remove (mark as a comment) the line, specifying how the /dev/dsk/c0d0s3 should be mounted.
  • Create the ZFS pool: zpool create -f mypool /dev/dsk/c0d0s3 (the -f parameter forces to overwrite the existing UFS file system.
  • Check the ZFS pool: zfs list

Once the ZFS pool is set then actual file systems can be created inside it. One of the obvious choices would file system for /export/home. This can be achieved in two simple commands, for example:

  • zfs create mypool/home
  • zfs set mountpoint="/export/home" mypool/home

And this is all folks :-) -- the Solaris Express, Comunity Edition is ready for the game!

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

The views expressed on this blog are my own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Oracle.

Search

Archives
« April 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
   
       
Today