Friday Aug 29, 2014

OLL Live Event: WebLogic Server 12.1.3 Using FMWC to Manage WebLogic Server Domains

I will be demonstrating how to use Fusion Middleware Control (FMWC) to manage WebLogic Server domains with WebLogic Server 12.1.3.

FMWC enables you to manage your WebLogic Server domains using and Enterprise Manager (EM)-based GUI that shares common characteristics with other EM consoles. FMWC is packaged as part of the FMW infrastructure package that includes Java Required Files (JRF), the Repository Creation Utility (RCU), and Oracle Platform Security Services (OPSS). FMWC provides some capabilities that are not readily available with the default WebLogic Server administration console, such as configuring and managing OPSS-based security.I recently developed the WebLogic Server 12.1.3 New Features Self-Study course on OLL and some associated OBE tutorials to show you how to configure and use these features.

When you install the FMW infrastructure package, WebLogic Server 12.1.3 is included as part of the installation. You can really just download the one file, install it, configure a domain, and start using FMWC.

You start FMWC control for your domain by browsing to the regular listen port of your administration server and specifying em as the application context.

The main page appears, which shows you your domain at a glance. What servers are running, which servers are down, the status of your clusters, and more.

You use the controls in the upper left-hand corner of the page to access more FMWC features.

FMWC enables you to configure server templates,

start,stop, and configure clusters,

manage application deployments,

and more.

You can attend the OLL Live Event listed below, or if you're more of a do-it-yourself type of person you can check it out in the Self-Study course listed above.


OLL Live Event Announcement

Oracle

Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3: Using Fusion Middleware Control to Manage WebLogic Server

Date: Wednesday, September 17th, 2014 Time: 9:00 am US/Pacific time

Oracle

This webcast demonstrates how to use Fusion Middleware Control (FMWC) to manage a WebLogic Server domain. Learn how to use FMWC to view domain statistics, start and stop servers and clusters, manage application deployments, manage JDBC data sources, and manage users and groups without using the WebLogic administration console.

To access the content this event is based on, click here


Oracle

Mark Lindros

Mark Lindros has been in the IT industry since 1994, fulfilling various roles in support, consulting, and courseware development and delivery. His entire career spans the enterprise application space, using the products that now form the foundation of Oracle Fusion Middleware. Mark was the world wide internal field readiness developer at BEA for WebLogic Server 4.5.1-10.0. Mark also has expertise in a number of other Oracle products, including Java, Oracle Entitlements Server, Coherence, Oracle Platform Security Services, the Tuxedo product suite, and WebLogic Portal. Recently, he completed the development of the WebLogic Server 12.1.3 New Features Self-Study and associated Oracle by Example tutorials.


Access recordings of previous OLL Live Events.

Register for other OLL Live Events.

Send questions or comments to OLL-LIVE-ADMIN@beehiveonline.oracle.com.

OLL Live Event: WebLogic Server 12.1.3 Using REST Services to Manage WebLogic Domains

I will be demonstrating how to use RESTful requests to manage WebLogic Server domains with WebLogic Server 12.1.3.


OLL Live Event Announcement

Oracle

Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3: Using REST Services to Manage WebLogic Server

Date: Wednesday, September 10th, 2014 Time: 9:00 am US/Pacific time

Oracle

This webcast demonstrates how to use RESTful requests to manage a WebLogic Server domain. Learn how to format REST requests to start and stop servers and clusters, manage application deployments, and manage JDBC data sources... all from the command-line!

To access the content this event is based on, click here


Oracle

Mark Lindros

Mark Lindros has been in the IT industry since 1994, fulfilling various roles in support, consulting, and courseware development and delivery. His entire career spans the enterprise application space, using the products that now form the foundation of Oracle Fusion Middleware. Mark was the world wide internal field readiness developer at BEA for WebLogic Server 4.5.1-10.0. Mark also has expertise in a number of other Oracle products, including Java, Oracle Entitlements Server, Coherence, Oracle Platform Security Services, the Tuxedo product suite, and WebLogic Portal. Recently, he completed the development of the WebLogic Server 12.1.3 New Features Self-Study and associated Oracle by Example tutorials.


Access recordings of previous OLL Live Events.

Register for other OLL Live Events.

Send questions or comments to OLL-LIVE-ADMIN@beehiveonline.oracle.com.

OLL Live Event: WebLogic Server 12.1.3 Whole Server Migration with Dynamic Clusters

I will be demonstrating whole server migration of a server on a dynamic cluster with WebLogic Server 12.1.3.

Although whole server migration isn't new to WebLogic Server (as of version 9.0), the last release of WebLogic Server (12.1.2) didn't support this type of migration for servers that were part of a dynamic or mixed cluster. I recently developed the WebLogic Server 12.1.3 New Features Self-Study course on OLL and some associated OBE tutorials to show you how to configure and use these features.

The configuration of whole server migration is essentially the same as it was before. The only difference is that you need to make sure the floating IP addresses you configure for the Node Manager to use to migrate your servers matches the IP addresses of the servers themselves. The trick for this is to leverage configuration macros used for configuring servers in a dynamic cluster. The listen address of the server is suffixed with the server's ID, thus creating a unique IP address for each server. When Node Manager needs to bring the server up, it automatically activates the matching IP address from its pool for that server so it is enabled on the networking interface and starts the server.

You can attend the OLL Live Event listed below, or if you're more of a do-it-yourself type of person you can check it out in the Self-Study course listed above.


OLL Live Event Announcement

Oracle

Oracle WebLogic Server 12.1.3: Using Whole Server Migration with Dynamic Clusters

Date: Wednesday, September 3rd, 2014 Time: 9:00 am US/Pacific time

Oracle

This webcast will demonstrate how to configure whole server migration for clusters that contain dynamically created servers. Watch as JMS messages are placed on a queue on one server, that server is automatically migrated to another machine, and the same JMS messages are accessible by the migrated server.

To access the content this event is based on, click here


Oracle

Mark Lindros

Mark Lindros has been in the IT industry since 1994, fulfilling various roles in support, consulting, and courseware development and delivery. His entire career spans the enterprise application space, using the products that now form the foundation of Oracle Fusion Middleware. Mark was the world wide internal field readiness developer at BEA for WebLogic Server 4.5.1-10.0. Mark also has expertise in a number of other Oracle products, including Java, Oracle Entitlements Server, Coherence, Oracle Platform Security Services, the Tuxedo product suite, and WebLogic Portal. Recently, he completed the development of the WebLogic Server 12.1.3 New Features Self-Study and associated Oracle by Example tutorials.


Access recordings of previous OLL Live Events.

Register for other OLL Live Events.

Send questions or comments to OLL-LIVE-ADMIN@beehiveonline.oracle.com.

Friday Dec 13, 2013

Interactive Posters

I lead a team that develops a framework that generates interactive quick reference tools for Oracle products. We affectionately refer to these as "posters". This tool is still under development, but we have released a couple of posters for popular Oracle products, such as the Oracle Database and Oracle WebLogic Server. These tools take you from an intuitive graphical view of a typical configured architecture for a product and allow you to drill down into deeper details, including related documentation and free online training on the Oracle Learning Library, providing the training you need, just when you need it.

Database 12c Poster

WebLogic Server 12c Poster

Stay tuned because we have several other posters in the works for other Oracle products. 

Tuxedo Optimizations for Exalogic

 

 I created a demo for Tuxedo optimized features for Tuxedo. It is already posted on several Oracle social networks, but I figured I would list it here as well in case someone is following my blog and not some of our other channels.

 This demo covers almost every Exalogic feature that is supported by Tuxedo 12c and spells out everything very clearly. If you are trying to get started using Tuxedo on Exalogic, then this is a great way to see the features in action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qKWrHs2xAwY

Tuesday Dec 10, 2013

Efficient Starting and Stopping of WebLogic Servers in Scripts

Introduction

When I first started writing scripts to start and stop WebLogic servers... ok, even after years of doing it... a fellow Oracle coworker tuned me in to trying a better approach. You see, initially I would start a server and then loop for a particular amount of time that I thought it would take for the server to be in the RUNNING state. This is problematic for a true automation process because the timing can potentially be off so subsequent processes can start before the servers are ready, or they may take a lot longer to start after servers have successfully reached the RUNNING state.

The Solution

Use the lwp-request (simple WWW user agent) command to make requests to our running server and check the returned response to see if the server is started or not. This command can be used to determine started and stopped states, depending on which action you are performing. A good practice is also to encapsulate the functionality into a shell function, within a script file of its own that can be sourced by multiple scripts. This way, any changes are only made in a single location and are realized throughout the scripting infrastructure.

Example Function Code


checkwls.sh

export SLEEPTIME=5

#Loop determining state of WLS
function check_wls {
    ACTION=$1
    while true
    do
        echo -e "***** Waiting for WebLogic server to get $ACTION *****"
        sleep $SLEEPTIME
        status=`lwp-request http://host01:7001 | grep "500 Can't connect"`
        if [ "$ACTION" == "started" ] && [ -z "$status" ]; then
            break
        elif [ "$ACTION" == "shutdown" ] && [ ! -z "$status" ]; then
            break
        fi
    done
    echo -e "\nWebLogic Server has $ACTION\n"
}


Example of Importing and Using the Function in Another Script


startAdmin.sh

source /practices/tune/bin/checkwls.sh

#Start AdminServer within a gnome terminal window
cd /u01/domains/tune/wlsadmin
gnome-terminal -t "AdminServer" -e "bash -c \"./startWebLogic.sh; exec bash;\""

#Wait and check for AdminServer to start using imported function
check_wls started

#For stopping the server use
check_wls stopped


Explanation and Summary

  1. The check_wls function uses the passed in action to determine if it is checking to see if the server has started or stopped. This is stored in the $ACTION variable.
  2. The function begins an infinite loop.
  3. The function sleeps for $SLEEPTIME (which is a hardcoded 5 seconds) to allow the server some time to reach its intended state.
  4. The server is called using lwp-request using the http://host01:7001 hardcoded URL. This can easily be a passed in variable to use the function for any server in a domain. The result of the lwp-request call piped into a grep call for an HTTP 500 connection error is captured in the $status variable.
  5. The $status variable is checked based on the intended action of starting or stopping the server. If $status is correct for that action, the function breaks the loop and returns control to the calling script.
  6. Using 5 second sleep intervals allows some time for processing, and also means that there will not be a long period of time between when the server is started and when the script recognizes it.
  7. The script recognizes the server's state using an actual call and response from the server so it is able to efficiently determine exactly when the next processing step is safe to execute.

About


Mark Lindros
Oracle FMW Curriculum Developer

Former BEA and Oracle TM Consultant, Support Engineer, and internal Staff Engineer

I have been in the IT industry since 1994, fulfilling various roles along the way. My entire career spans the enterprise application space. I started as a Tuxedo specialist, and later changed my focus to Java EE and WebLogic Server. I have extensive field experience implementing solutions using multiple Oracle FMW products.

When I'm not stuck behind my desk unraveling technology, I can be found enjoying my family, working out, playing video games, mountain biking, and enjoying life.

This blog is for posting interesting technical findings I make while using Oracle FMW products.

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