OpenJDK Mercurial Forest

We are getting pretty close now to getting the OpenJDK Mercurial forest content. A forest is just a directory tree or set of directories that can contain multiple repositories. Each of the repositories are independent and are grouped only due to the location of it's directory. Here is an illustration that may help understand the layout and content of a full OpenJDK forest:

In many cases developers may only need to deal with one or two repositories so their own local forests may be pretty sparse, they may not necessarily need all the OpenJDK forest, however, verifying a change doesn't impact the build of the entire forest may require a developer to have a full forest.

A distributed SCM like Mercurial (or TeamWare) allows for distributed development but also isolated development between teams. Each team has an integration area where team members push their changes to, and one team member is assigned the task of integrating those changes into the MASTER forest which is used to create the promoted builds and the final product. A change will trickle from a individual's forest to the integration forest used and finally to the MASTER forest. This is essentially the historic model that we have used with TeamWare workspaces. Changes to integration areas are fresher for that team, but unless it's been sync'd with the MASTER may contain stale changes in other areas.

So there are decisions about what part of the forest you are interested in, and what integration area you might want to see changes from.

-kto

Comments:

Post a Comment:
Comments are closed for this entry.
About

Various blogs on JDK development procedures, including building, build infrastructure, testing, and source maintenance.

Search

Archives
« July 2014
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
  
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
  
       
Today