Mozilla Keyboard Accessibility proposal

Those who have been playing with Mozilla accessibility on UNIX and Linux systems know that we "aren't there yet" with it. An attempt to fix one of the larger failings is the Mozilla/Gecko Keyboard Navigation Proposal, now available for review.

Interested parties are strongly encouraged to review it, and send comments to < mozilla-accessibility [at] mozilla [dot] org >

(subscribe via the usual list interface: mozilla-accessibility-request@mozilla.org or via the fancy web interface).

As much-loved movie reviewer Joe Bob Briggs sez, "Check it out!"

Comments:

I'm organizing a Carnegie-Mellon West Coast Campus Speakers Panel entitled, "Back to Proprietary Client-Server, or Web Renaissance?", for November 10th, 2004, at Bldg. 23, Moffett Field, CA.

As we continue to see rich-GUI Web software slide into proprietary formats, and the pressure on Microsoft to "play nicely" from legal battles ease, the time is right to address the future of the Web.


\*\* Details:

In this panel, I will have the panelists speak to the following questions:

\* What role did open standards (specifically, HTTP and HTML) play in the initial adoption (from 1994 onward) of the Web and its development into a giant new business market and more?

\* How did these open standards come to take hold? What were the major obstacles? Was the driving force to adoption a mix of technological evangelism and market forces?

\* Compare and contrast HTML to DHTML (Dynamic HTML) with the JavaScript binding. Give your perspective on client-side Web software development, and its importance today on the Web.

\* What is the importance of Dynamic HTML and the binding to JavaScript on the Web today? Do you view the application of OO techniques to JavaScript, particularly simulation of Java-like class-based inheritance in JavaScript, as helpful in deploying Web software?

\* Is JavaScript a more realistic choice on the Web than Java for the front-end of consumer Web applications, due to JavaScript's current near-ubiquity, lack of need for installation, fast start-up time, and security (especially, it's lack of a file API)? Give your view of the pros and cons of server-centric Web development (i.e., JSP, ASP) as opposed to a Web based on the distributed application or client-server concept.

\* What are the pros and cons to the consumer Web user, who needs high usability, interactivity, and speed, on dial-up and on high-speed? What are the pros and cons to the server center, from the perspectives of IT (i.e., scalability), engineering, and security?

\* Why is it that the "other" Web browsers -- the non-Microsoft Web browsers -- do not support the W3C standards correctly enough to support building "next generation" Web applications based on public Web standards?

\* What is the impact of this situation, as we see rich-GUI Web applications migrate to proprietary formats such as Flash and IE-specific? What can be done to improve the support of Web browsers for rich-GUI Web applications built solely on W3C standards?

\* What are the security implications of a Web highly fragmented among Flash browsers, Microsoft Longhorn Client browsers, Web-standard browsers, and Internet Explorer-specific Web sites? Would this amount to an unmanageable blizzard of security patches for consumers?

\* Would an industry consortium be an appropriate vehicle for this task? Can the market alone, in its current state, take care of this situation? Is technological evangelism needed?

\* Imagining a supportive climate for distributed Web applications built on Web standards, what market spaces would this create? What would be the role of current vendors of traditional Web application frameworks, such as BEA, IBM, and Sun/Netscape?

- Chris

Posted by Christopher M. Balz on September 29, 2004 at 09:12 AM PDT #

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