Monday Oct 14, 2013

Oracle Java Now Part of Raspberry Pi Raspian Distribution

Having sold more than 1.75 million units in its brief lifespan, there is no denying the profound impact the Raspberry Pi has had on the embedded development community.  Amid all the hoopla surrounding the recently completed Oracle OpenWorld and Java One events, one announcement that flew under the radar dealt with the fact that the Oracle JDK is now part of the Raspberry Pi Raspian distribution.

This means that by default, when you download and install the latest Raspian distribution on your Raspberry Pi, the Oracle Java runtime environment and development tools are automatically part of the list of packages installed.  Here's a screenshot showing a login session to a Raspberry Pi running the 2013-09-25-wheezy-raspian distribution.  The JDK is installed as the oracle-java7-jdk package and is utilizing the Java 7u40 release.

For those who either cannot or do not wish to perform an entire Raspian upgrade, the Oracle JDK is available via the following command:

$ sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install oracle-java7-jdk

Great news.

Saturday Dec 22, 2012

A Raspberry Pi / JavaFX Electronic Scoreboard Application

As evidenced at the recently completed JavaOne 2012 conference, community excitement towards the Raspberry Pi and its potential as a Java development and deployment platform was readily palpable.  Fast forward three months, Oracle has announced the availability of a JDK 8 (with JavaFX) for Arm Early Access Developer Preview where the reference platform for this release is none other than the Raspberry Pi.

What makes this especially interesting to me is the addition of JavaFX to the Java SE-Embedded 8 platform.  It turns out that at $35US, the (not so) humble Raspberry Pi has a very capable graphics processor, opening up a Pandora's box of graphics applications that could be applied to this beloved device.  As a first step in becoming familiar with just how this works, I decided to dust off a two year old JavaFX scoreboard application, originally written for a Windows laptop, and see how it would run on the Pi.  Low and behold, the application runs unmodified (without even a recompile).

The video that follows shows how an ordinary flat screen TV can be converted into a full screen electronic scoreboard driven by a Raspberry Pi.  The requirements for such a solution are incredibly straightforward: (1) the TV needs access to a power receptacle and (2) it must be within range of a WiFi network in order to receive scoreboard update packets.  The device is so compact and miserly from a power perspective, that we velcro the Pi to the back of the TV and get our power from the TV's USB port. If you can spare a few moments, it just might be worth your while to take a look.



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Jim Connors

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