JVM Language Summit agenda is posted

Samuel Johnson (the dictionary writer) once observed, “Language is the dress of thought.” This is true enough, and I suppose it implies that the JVM Language Summit is a clothing show. (Should we meet in Paris?) More boldly, Ludwig Wittgenstein wrote, “The limits of my language mean the limits of my world.” In those terms, the Summit is about building the world, at least those parts that run on silicon, and as that world becomes multi-core, our languages are becoming a limiting factor. In any case, for me, the Summit is a chance to visit, chat, and dream big with you fellow world builders (or tailors) out there.

Next month, we are once again gathering a room full of language and VM developers at Oracle’s Sun Santa Clara Campus, for the three-day meeting known as the JVM Language Summit. This year (like before) we have an excellent set of speakers lined up. I have just posted the agenda.

If you missed the call for speakers, but are a VM or language implementor who wants to have an extended chat with your colleagues about where the JVM is going, consider coming to Santa Clara on Jul 26-28. There are still some participant slots available. Space is limited, because this is designed as a one-room event. If you can’t come, you may also enjoy the recorded talks from previous years, and those from this year, since we are planning to record them.


P.S. Samuel Johnson was quoting a well-known Roman language researcher, who elsewhere noted that language design is almost a solved problem, as follows: “Atqui plerosque videas haerentes circa singula et dum inveniunt et dum inventa ponderant ac dimetiuntur.” (“When our language is good Latin, significant, elegant and aptly arranged, why should we labor for anything more?” Institutio Oratoria, VIII.0.30, pub. A.D. 95.) Luckily for us aficionados, language design continues. (To all Quintilian fans: Yes, I took him out of context. Sorry.)
Comments:

Are there any discussion about how to help other languages to run on the JVM?
It's seems that people at Sun/Oracle are Java-centric and most improvement proposals are dismissed like "If Java doesn't need it, the JVM won't get it".

But apart from InvokeDynamic not much happened. Which is basically some sort of marketing joke, where the PR group at Sun probably thought "Damn, the .NET people tout themselves of being friendly to dynamic languages. We need something which will make us look like them, too.".

In the end, tail call and real generics support will show if Sun/Oracle takes other languages seriously or lets them just play around as long as they won't compete with Java (like all these "dynamic" languages).

Posted by Steve McJones on June 26, 2010 at 10:06 PM PDT #

Have you got somebody who can talk about Project Lambda, and encourage discussion about compatibility between Project Lambda's strategies and other existing JVM languages? (In particular, I'm thinking about Scala's traits and Project Lambda's defender methods.)

Posted by Ken Bloom on June 28, 2010 at 03:59 AM PDT #

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About

John R. Rose

Java maven, HotSpot developer, Mac user, Scheme refugee.

Once Sun and present Oracle engineer.

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