Friday Feb 05, 2010

Building International Communities in Tokyo

Here are two really nice articles in the Japan Times talking about the international tech community in Tokyo:
The articles describe the meta community here, and that's where we OpenSolaris guys hang out. By contributing to the larger community, we've found that the OpenSolaris community here is growing and earning its way right along side everyone else. There are language and culture barriers to overcome, but we all are making a great deal of progress. It's quite common now to find OpenSolaris developers, administrators, and users participating in multiple international communities, which, of course, helps us to learn in return. And the Web 2.0 community is growing in size and diversity as well. Also, since the tech community locally is well connected globally, we can extend our reach around the world by just interacting right here at home. Here's my photo archive as well (mostly Linux & OpenSolaris).

Tuesday Feb 02, 2010

Half Way to Closing the Stage

We said at the October 27, 2009 move to that we`d keep available for 6 months with a snapshot of the content we migrated to the new site in case people needed it as a reference for cleaning up their Collectives. Or if some files didn`t migrate properly, we could do those manually. Or if people just wanted to check formatting. Well, this is a reminder that we are half way though that time period, and will be decommissioned at the end of April 2010. If you need to reference your old content, please do so before that time. We`ll send monthly reminders until the final date. And I can`t believe it`s been three months already. Time flies, having fun, and all that.

Monday Feb 01, 2010

OpenSolaris in India's Digit

Abhishek Kumar, the leader of the Mumbai OpenSolaris User Group in India, surely gets the star of the month for getting OpenSolaris into Digit, India's largest IT magazine. There will be a 100,000 copies of this special 96 page mini book -- "Fast Track to OpenSolaris" -- on Install, ZFS, DTrace, Source Juicer, etc. Check out the contents of the February magazine shipment. Nice to see OpenSolaris on one of the DVDs. See Abhishek's announcement here. Beautiful cover on that mini book, eh?

Sunday Jan 31, 2010

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group 013010

There were two sessions (beginners/advanced) at the monthly Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group on Saturday:

OpenSolaris Study Group 013010

OpenSolaris Study Group 013010

A third concurrent session will be opened hopefully starting in February or March. More info soon. Subscribe to ug-jposug and ug-tsug to participate.

More info about the OpenSolaris communtiy in Japan here. More OpenSolaris photos here.

Thursday Jan 28, 2010

OpenSolaris: My Original Pre Launch Email in 2005

Earlier today I was thinking about the original "good luck" email I sent to the OpenSolaris Pilot Community just before we opened the project in June of 2005. Fortunately, the opensolaris-discuss public archive actually goes back 9 months before we launched, so this mail survives in the open and from the other threads you get a glimpse into some of the very earliest conversations taking place when the project was private. Anyway, what strikes me is how different the situation was back then, how utterly conservative we were, and how my thinking has changed as a result of my experiences all along the way. A day after I sent this email, we opened. See my opening blog here, and the result of that opening announcement here. History. Always enlightening.

[osol-discuss] Good Luck and Thank You

Jim Grisanzio Jim.Grisanzio at Sun.COM
Mon Jun 13 17:27:01 PDT 2005

Hello, OpenSource Pilot Community.

I just wanted to chime in before the fur really flies around here:

 Good Luck, and Thank You!

You all deserve Sun's thanks for your efforts and your patience this 
year. It should be wild day tomorrow, for sure, so light up those blogs 
and start talking, guys. The engineers are leading this launch tomorrow, 
make no mistake about it.

Oh, and if you want to bring someone into the program, you \*don't\* have 
to call me and sign another f\*\*\*\*\*\* NDA. Just do it. I can't tell you 
how happy I am to not have to dig out another NDA. Not that I could read 
the damn thing but whatever. It's such a cold way to start a friendly 
little conversation, don't you think? Also, I've tried to honor as many 
of your requests (and those from internal people) as possible to get 
people into the program. We ended up with 145, but quite frankly, dozens 
and dozens of developers never made it in due to lack of time or 
resources. We even had a dozen Chinese engineers all briefed, 
translated, and NDA-signed but couldn't get export control approval in 
time. It drove me nuts for three months. I'm more than a bit pissed 
about that one.

Anyway, I hope you are happy with the results of what we are all 
releasing. The core team here has worked almost non-stop for weeks on 
this to get ready for the final push. We wanted to do more, you know 
that, but hey, look at where we were last year and look at the potential 
tomorrow brings. Also, the OpenSolaris team internally really has been 
genuine in their intentions, I can assure you. At times we've not been 
as open as we could have been -- we get that -- but I hope you believe 
me when I say that many people on the team fought hard on your behalf 
all year long. Every time you told us we were full of shit on something 
we took it to heart and it went up line. There were a few, ah, heated, 
conversations regarding some of the issues that were discussed in the 
pilot. We won some and we lost some, but every time we moved a little 
closer to our goal of openness. As you've seen, this stuff takes time. I 
wish we could have exposed more of that process to you. Next time it 
will probably be easier to do that.

As this program has grown it's garnered attention from all across Sun 
and from Sun's competitors and supporters. Just recently, I've heard 
from executives and engineers traveling to South America and to Asia, 
and they report that there \*absolutely\* is massive community interest 
out there. Even Wall Street has noticed. Some people are probably a bit 
confused since the Solaris community was supposed to be dead by now. 
Well, too bad. It's too late. They lost their window of opportunity to 
crush us. Our next step is to stay positive and to engage the interest 
we know is there, make it tangible, and grow this OpenSolaris community.

In a very real way, you've all been part of something special here. 
You've helped change this company and potentially an entire market along 
the way. Some people may not know this quite yet, but they'll surely 
find out tomorrow. You are some of the most knowledgeable people in the 
world about Solaris, and you've help make OpenSolaris a possibility. 
Congratulations and we'll see you on the other side.


Tuesday Jan 26, 2010

Updating Website Community Space

Spent some time cleaning up the content in the Website Community yesterday. The transition to auth/xwiki is over, so I rewrote a lot of the content we had pointing to the project management docs and moved some content to archive to clean up the nav. I cut the amount of content on the top level page in half. Roadmap & Announcements updated too. Over the last few months, we've accumulated a huge amount of information about the website project and various community processes. Still streamlining. Next needs to address the front page of the site.

Friday Jan 22, 2010

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210: Photos

Some images from the OpenSolaris Night Seminar in Tokyo earlier this evening with presentations from Junko Yoshida, Mami Sueki, and Shoji Haraguchi. Video from Shoji Haraguchi here.

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210 OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210 OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210 OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210

OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210 OpenSolaris Night Seminar 012210

Hundreds more images from the OpenSolaris community in Japan right here.

Updated XWiki for OpenSolaris

Chris updated our implementation of XWiki yesterday to v2.1.1, which fixes a bunch of bugs we had been living with while using v1.8. The current bug list for hub is on, so please file any issues there. Also note we doubled the number of languages we are supporting with this update (screen of 17 language codes). See the localization page if you want to contribute translations. More website application updates to come: auth, repo, and poll are on tap next. Roadmap here.

Sunday Jan 17, 2010

2 New OpenSolaris Website Translation Projects

The latest version of is now in the Community Translation Interface for a localization update, and we are also now starting to localize as well. Because of many community contributions recently, already lives in 17 languages. It will be good to get the SCM Console at localized into a bunch of languages via the same process as we continue updating that application in the coming months. See the announcement from Ales on i18n-discuss for details about contributing to these these two website projects.

The localization of -- which is currently 15 applications -- will come together over time and in various stages. But I really would like all of it localized into at least two dozen languages by the end of this year. Should be doable. So, if you are interested in participating, I wrote an outline about how we are breaking this into pieces and how you can get involved: Localizing Website Content. I will update the document as the project evolves. See the Internationalization & Localization Community for even more projects and information. Subscribe to i18n-discuss. Thanks.

Friday Jan 15, 2010

OpenSolaris Night Seminar, January 22, Tokyo

Shoji Haraguchi just announced the next OpenSolaris Night Seminar in Tokyo. It will be on January 22nd in Jingumae. On tap will be Crossbow and Solaris Containers. Register early. These seminars generally fill up pretty quickly, and there's only room for about 100 people in the room. You know, we really could use some bigger conference rooms to hold these events. Lots of people are interested in OpenSolaris in Tokyo. See you there.

Tuesday Dec 22, 2009

OpenSolaris at the 2010 Japan Developer Summit

The OpenSolaris Community will participate at 2010 Japan Developer Summit in Tokyo February 18-19. Subscribe to ug-jposug and ug-tsug for more information.

OpenSolaris 2010.03 Translation Cycle Continues

It's cool to see the localization of the OpenSolaris distribution moving right along with contributions going directly into the development builds. [i18n-discuss] The 2nd translation cycle of OpenSolaris 2010.03.

Saturday Dec 19, 2009

Updating Common Content:

Since the transition to the Auth and XWiki applications in August and October, the website team has been updating (editing, deleting, moving, merging, rewriting) the majority of common content on the site -- all the stuff around the edges, the stuff not in Communities, Projects, User Groups, or Subsites. We're making good progress on these updates now as well as maintaining various project management documents for the website transition. Here is the initial list of two dozen files we updated recently. More coming. Send questions/suggestions to website-discuss. File bugs at

Here are the most important content updates in this round:

  • Website Roles & Collectives (Updated):
    Start here to understand the context around all of the roles in all of the collectives on the site (including the elusive Electorate) and who has Website Privileges, Administrative Privileges, Source Code Repository Privileges, and Governance Privileges. It's all on one page.
  • Website User Guide (New):
    An outline of the essential tasks most users perform on the site based on the roles they hold and the collectives in which they participate.
  • Localizing Website Content (New):
    An emerging contribution model to translate all the content on the website.
  • Website Infrastructure Life Cycles (Updated):
    How community members can acquire new website infrastructure, and how that infrastructure is managed throughout various life cycles. All the spaces on the site have slightly different acquisition processes, but everything is documented on one page.
  • How to Participate (Updated):
    There are many ways to participate in the OpenSolaris Community. Advocate for the community, contribute code, report bugs, translate content, help new users get involved, port and maintain packages, write documentation, start user groups. How would you like to participate? Tell us.

After the winter break, we'll address more content issues (including the front page of the site), we'll  deploy significant updates to the Auth and XWiki applications (both are being tested now), and we'll  start working on some graphical and navigation issues across the site. Looking forward to it. We're making solid progress now, and we have a pretty good plan to continually evolve the site to support OpenSolaris engineering operations and community development programs around the world.

For updates, check the current roadmap (which we are building now). The 2009 roadmap has been updated and is final. Also, I will keep the announcements page up to date as we move into the new year.

Friday Dec 18, 2009

OpenSolaris Hot Topics Seminar in Tokyo 121909

I stopped by the OpenSolaris Hot Topics Seminar in Jingumae tonight ...

OpenSolaris Hot Topics 121909 OpenSolaris Hot Topics 121909

OpenSolaris Hot Topics 121909 OpenSolaris Hot Topics 121909

Here are the presentations and videos from the event from Shoji Haraguchi. Japanese language only. See Shoji's YouTube space for more OpenSolaris videos.

OpenSolaris at Tokyo Charity Event

The OpenSolaris community in Japan participated at a charity event last night -- Tokyo's Biggest Tech Party Ever. I don't know if it was the biggest ever, but there were 400 people there throughout the evening from over a dozen tech communities in the city. Michael Sullivan, who leads the Tokyo OSUG and who got us involved in the event, auctioned off a bag stuffed full of OpenSolaris and Glassfish items (shirts, CDs, books, mice, pens, pads, hats, and whatever else we could find). Good time. Some images.

Saturday Dec 12, 2009

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group 121209

I stopped by the Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group meeting in Yoga today. The guys were running two consecutive sessions on ZFS, Solaris Internals, and Driver Development. Good turn out for a Saturday afternoon, too. About 35 people came to the sessions with another 30 or so contributing on IRC at #opensolaris-jp on Freenode. Here are some images:

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group

Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group

 The Tokyo OpenSolaris Study Group grew out of the Japan OpenSolaris User Group. Here are some links to more information about the OpenSolaris community in Japan. And here is a stash of several years of images from OpenSolaris in Japan.

Thursday Dec 03, 2009

Localizing OpenSolaris Website Content

Now that we've moved to XWiki, we should go about the business of localizing more of the OpenSolaris website. This is going to take a while and it will require work from the community and from the website engineering team. It may also require some people from Sun and the OpenSolaris community getting directly involved in the XWiki community, which could prove interesting as the communities benefit from each other's contributions. It's a big opportunity all around, and hopefully we'll be able to build more OpenSolaris development communities around the world by simply speaking more languages on our website. There will be multiple steps involved to localize everything, but at least we have some tools in place and a much better platform from which to build some interesting localization projects. So, here are the big three buckets:

1. Auth

Auth is already localized into 17 languages thanks to the contributions of the OpenSolaris community using the Sun Open CTI tool. In a few weeks, we will update auth, and then after that the community will be able to update the localizations for auth as well. The process of localizing auth is well known now, and we'll just move ahead as we have in the past. Auth is most important in this process because the more languages we can localize into the more languages we can offer on our implementation of XWiki at Remember, hub is integrated with auth and part of that integration means that language preferences are set in auth.

2. XWiki

XWiki currently supports 21 languages in the base application. Now, if you go to the OpenSolaris website and edit a page, you will see the following text in the right navigation bar:
Document translations
You are editing the original document.
Translate this document in: cs de en es fr pl ru zh
Here's what it looks like in a screen shot. Those eight languages represent the intersection between localizations supported on and those supported by the XWiki application itself. It's important that we build out that intersection so we can enable more languages on for the community to localize more general OpenSolaris content. So, when you click on a language code in that nav, certain elements on the screen will immediately change to that language, and the URL will change to language=[whatever language you chose]. After you translate and save the page, the right nav bar in edit mode will display the language code, and also at the top right side of the page the new language code (among whatever other translations are there) will display with a little flag icon. That tells users the page is localized into any number of languages. Pretty basic but we didn't have this capability on the old site.

Now, here's the challenging and/or confusing part from a social point of view. is not a wiki where anyone can edit and translate anything. The site is actually comprised of many applications and many spaces, but all of the content basically fits into three big sections:
  1. Common Content: This content includes the front page, project overview, FAQ center, roadmaps, site map, downloads, Collectives overview and navigation, navs, header/footer spaces and documents, style sheets, etc. Sun's Website Team manages the common content on, and requests to update and translate this information can be made on website-discuss. Contact information here.
  2. Collective Content: This is all the content inside all the hundreds of Collectives on the site -- Community Groups, Projects, User Groups. Leaders of those Collectives are responsible for managing their own content and for providing edit privileges to their community members. Contact information here.
  3. Subsites Content:This is all the content on the dozen or so applications, sometimes called subsites, that provide services to users and developers, such as (code review), (source juicer), (package), (test), etc. And each subsite has an owner. The site map has more details. Contact information here.
So, you can only translate content where you have privileges to edit in the first place, and the site gets all that user access data from auth, which is set up to implement the structure of the community as specified in the OpenSolaris Constitution. It's actually not as complicated as it sounds (although it needs to get easier over time, we all know that). Here are the Roles and Collectives
we built into the new site, and that should be enough to explain the basic structure without having to read the entire Constitution. Basically, if you have edit privileges to your own areas on the site and you want to translate some content, then go translate content. Just do it. But if you want to translate content in an area of the site where you don't already have edit privileges, then you should contact the Leaders in those areas and ask them if they would be interested in having their stuff localized and if they would give you the appropriate editorial privileges to do that work. Can you imagine people saying no to that request? I can't. And the manual process of going out and talking to people will only increase the number of interactions community members will have with each other. That can only be good.

3. Subsites

The subsites should to get localized at some point, too. This can be accomplished in three steps:
  1. First, the website engineering team will build a backend web application to serve all the common graphical elements of the OpenSolaris website to all the subsites, so that includes the headers, footers, wordmarks, logos, icons, etc. This way, the entire website can have a common look and feel (as much as possible given that there are many applications involved). Also, the benefit of this concept becomes clear when we have to update common elements of the site or add new translations or templates. Then all of the subsites will be updated as well and those owners don't have to worry about keeping in sync with the rest of the site. Over time, all of the sites that make up will look and feel more like one site (with single sign on via auth, of course). That's the goal anyway.
  2. Second, the OpenSolaris community will be able to localize all the content for that web application, and when we are ready we'll make it available via the Open CTI tool. So, even embedded text in icons will be translated.
  3. Third, OpenSolaris community members can contact the subsite owners and offer to translate that content, which can then be uploaded to each subsite by the Leaders.

Contribute Right Now

So, to sum up a bit, if you have language translations skills, here's how you can contribute to this crazy website localization effort:
  • Localize content in the areas that you already have privileges to edit.
  • Ask other Leaders in other Collectives if they would like you to localize their content. 
  • If you are a Leader of a Collective and you are not involved in localization and want your content translated, post to i18n-discuss and ask the Internationalization & Localization Community.
  • Ask the Website Team if they`d like the common content on the site localized. The answer is yes, by the way. We have updated a great deal of the site's common content (FAQs and such), and we continue to do so. So check with us first so we can remain in sync as much as possible.
  • Add more languages to auth via Open CTI by translating the auth resources file. Ask questions on i18n-discuss (subscribe here, archives here, forum here, blog here). A new auth resources file is coming soon.
  • Add more languages directly to the XWiki application at by translating the XWiki ApplicationResources file. NOTE: WE NEED A JAPANESE TRANSLATION OF THIS FILE! It's a big deal and would represent a gigantic contribution to the XWiki community as well as the OpenSolaris community. I am talking with the XWiki community about this as well (see thread beginning here and running about 15 messages). Currently, XWiki does not support Japanese (ja) among its list of 21 supported languages (it supports Japanese language text displayed on pages, of course, but not at the application resources level with menu and icons and the URL). Subscribe to the xwiki users list here.
  • Content translations are major contributions to this community. We take them seriously. Please read and sign the Sun Contributor Agreement (FAQ here), so everyone's rights are understood and protected. Here's more on contributing to OpenSolaris.

What do you think? I certainly don't have this all figured out yet, but that's enough to start. On the old site, we started this project with the Portals, but that was a very temporary effort to fix a site that didn't support localization. Auth and XWiki do support localization (see XWiki's application evaluation here), so now we can move much faster on these early steps. Even longer term, we'd like to develop a system to automate some of this so we can do bulk translations and publish those documents automatically. One thing at a time

Posted to i18n-discuss at opensolaris dot org (here, here). Join the conversation there.

Sunday Nov 22, 2009

Bandung OpenSolaris User Group

After spending Tuesday talking with hundreds of engineering students at ITHB Bandung (and after a great lunch with the university faculty), we found a very cool Bandung OpenSolaris User Group meeting at, which is Indonesia`s largest news portal (meeting references here and here). The gathering was held in a dimly lit driveway under a tent. For over two hours we sat on the floor on a carpet and just talked about building developer communities using OpenSolaris.

I didn`t present any slides. We just had a free-flowing conversation. It was a warm night and the rains (read: utterly massive downpours) had stopped, so everything was nice and relaxed and quiet. I tried to stress that it`s important to build community locally first (this way you can follow your own rules) but then to connect globally so you learn from others around the world. The second point I made was that there is no secret to establishing credibility in a community. It`s a simple concept, really. Contributing. That`s it. In fact, there is no other way. Your title does not matter. Nor does your age or political associations or position in any given organization. And you geography should`t matter, either. What matters most is your ability to get involved, to organize and engage new people, to build basic infrastructure and tools to facilitate participation, and then to contribute directly yourself. That`s how you build community -- and the building concept pervades all levels of a community. Everyone builds. And everyone builds from within the community, not from the outside. I also told a bunch of stories about the engineers, managers, and community developers I have met along the way, the ones I respect most and from who I still learn every day. Excellent night. Then the next morning some of guys took me to a nearby volcano.

Saturday Nov 21, 2009

OpenSolaris Day at ITHB Bandung

On Tuesday we went to ITHB in Bandung, which is about two hours from Jakarta, for another university visit. We were a bit late due to some really impressive winter rain, but when we arrived the energy in the room was palpable. Great fun. Loved every minute. Can`t wait to go back. More presos on OpenSolaris from Harry Kaligis, Agus Setiawan, Lukman Prihandika, Rachmat Febrianto, Alex Budiyanto. And me

Indonesia OpenSolaris User Group

On Monday after visiting Gunadarma University we went back to Jakarta for an OpenSolaris User Group meeting at the Sun office. Met a lot of nice guys and had some good conversations about OpenSolaris. More pics to come. 

Indonesia OSUG Jakarta Indonesia OSUG Jakarta

Blog tag: indonesia-09 | Photos on Flickr



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