Sunday May 23, 2010

Photos: Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010

Here are about 90 images from the Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010 this weekend at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ookayama Campus. I saw a bunch of guys from the OpenSolaris, Linux, and Java communities and also the crew from Tokyo Hackerspace. Great fun. Lot of interesting hacking going on in Tokyo, and everyone I spoke with said the community is growing in size, diversity, and quality.

See Make on Twitter here. See Make Magazine here. Also related from the past: Tokyo Hackerspace, O’Reilly Make Tokyo 04 2009, Tokyo BarCamp 2009, Yokohama BarCamp 2009. And don’t forget to participate at BarCamp Tokyo 2010 next week on Saturday May 29th!

Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010Tokyo Make Meeting 05 2010
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Here are 320 more images from Tokyo Make 05 2010 from Lem Fugitt (Robots-Dreams).

Tuesday Nov 24, 2009

O`Reilly Make Tokyo: Fall 2009 Photos

Monday was a holiday here in Japan so I went to the O`Reilly Make Conference and saw some of my Tokyo Hackerspace friends there -- among thousands of other Japanese Makers. Really good time.

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

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Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009 Make: Tokyo, Fall 2009

Make Magazine | My photos in Make blog (cool) | Make Conference News Video (Japanese)

Tuesday Sep 11, 2007

Deathmatch or Lovefest?

Noah Gift at O'Reilly has an interesting conversation going about OpenSolaris and GNU/Linux. Check it out:

Tuesday Sep 28, 2004

O'Reilly on F/OSS Licensing

I'm looking forward to picking up this book from O'Reilly, "Understanding Open Source and Free Software Licensing." Should be an interesting read considering my current job doing community relations for OpenSolaris.

Friday Mar 19, 2004

How to Define Open Community

I spent some time at the Open Source Business Conference this week in San Francisco and was struck by the behavior of Microsoft. Impressed, too. They sponsored, they did a keynote, they participated on panels, they talked up the lawyers, and they didn't spark any controversy. There was no talk of cancer and anti-American trends, either. On the contrary, I heard several people say, "Hey, Microsoft is here to learn." Pretty innoxious performance, I'd say.

But here's where it gets insidious. What they did was interesting rhetorically, and Aristotle -- the guy who first quantified rhetoric -- would be proud. They carefully mixed two terms with the intention of redefining both of them. Very smart. Basically, they said: "We are here to learn about open source, but 'community' is not exclusive to open source. We have a community program, too, and it's called shared source." Nice. Expand the term community on which open source is built by associating it with a program not based on open community concepts at all. It's a distinction with a pretty big difference. The term community means something very specific to open source developers, and Microsoft's shared source doesn't fit that definition. If you call them on it, they will gladly admit the distinction, but then they go about their business of redefining and elevating their program to community status until it's part of the open source vernacular. It's just another community model, after all, and we all know there are many different community models.

But at an open source conference? Perfect place, actually. But I think they are on the edge of what is generally accepted as the definition of an open community. Granted, there are passionate debates among developers about various open community models. NetBeans, Jxta, Linux, Apache, Gnome, Mozilla, OpenOffice, etc. All different, but all based on openness and sharing that benefits all involved.

Open source developers are not fooled by this, of course, but as Tim O'Reilly says, OSBC was filled with hundreds of lawyers, who are themselves expert rhetoricians. The conference was also filled with business people who rightly need to build profit-making models around emerging open source development methodologies. I'm not hitting lawyers and business people here. However, as the open source community matures and diversifies, multiple communities are growing and this gives Microsoft an opportunity to redefine terms and change the definition of what an open community means.

Thursday Mar 18, 2004

Paradigms well Defined

Tim O'Reilly spoke at the Open Source Business Conference yesterday in San Francisco and correctly cited Thomas Kuhn as the historian who popularized the concept of paradigms. This was refreshing since many people in technology toss around the word "paradigm" a bit too casually. The implications of paradigms are powerful and deserve the utmost respect, especially if you want to survive a paradigm shift.

Kuhn wrote in the Structure of Scientific Revolutions about the evolution of science and how the field grew through a series of major paradigm shifts -- one paradigm replacing the other not one built on top of the other, as our science textbooks suggest. Tim drew the parallel to the technology industry brilliantly.

Paradigms and their effect on technology was also beautifully explained by Clayton Christensen at the conference during his two hour evening keynote to a standing room only audience. Christensen, though, uses terms like innovation and disruption to explain his theories in The Innovator's Dilemma and The Innovator's Solution.

All three books are landmarks of strategic thought. They will terrify you if you are stuck in Christensen's sustaining technology or in Kuhn's normal science, but the books are also liberating for those who understand and embrace the phenomenon. Embrace it and succeed. Ignore it and fail. History demonstrates the concept with painful and exhilarating clarity -- depending on what side of the paradigm you are on, of course.

Update: Tim wrote up his talk as a comprehensive article here.
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