Friday Apr 16, 2010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041610

A few images from the Tokyo Linux User Group last night …

Saturday Apr 10, 2010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Some shots from the Tokyo Linux User Group meeting earlier this evening …

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Tokyo Linux User Group 041010 Tokyo Linux User Group 041010

Monday Mar 29, 2010

OpenSolaris DTrace @ Yokohama Linux UG

I went to the Yokohama Linux User Group meeting held at Rakuten Inc., in Shinagawa Seaside (far away), earlier tonight to see Hisayoshi Kato and Mikiya Okuno talk about DTrace. There were more than 80 guys there from multiple communities including OpenSolaris, Linux, BSD, MySQL, and others. For more on DTrace, including some Japanese presentations, see the OpenSolaris DTrace Day event from last Saturday in Tokyo.

Saturday Mar 27, 2010

A Quick Visit to Tokyo Hackerspace

I stopped by the Tokyo Hackerspace in Shirokanedai earlier today and dropped off 10 OpenSolaris Bibles and 15 OpenSolaris t-shirts. And a few hats. Actually, I dragged the stuff all the way from my office in Yoga. It took forever. Those damn bibles are bricks. A thousand pages each. But I figured a house full of international hackers could use some books and shirts. I find the Hackerspaces concept really interesting because it attracts people who participate in multiple communities.

Sunday Mar 14, 2010

Massive DTrace Day Coming to Tokyo

The Japanese OpenSolaris Community will be hosting a massive DTrace Day on Saturday, March 27th in Yoga. Meeting details are here in Japanese and here in English. Directions with photos are here in Japanese and English. There will be two rooms to hold the six sessions. All talks will be on DTrace and everything will be in Japanese. A nomikai will follow (of course). Developers working on all operating systems platforms are welcome.

DTrace at Yokohama Linux User Group

kato dtrace zfs japanIn my job I meet a lot of interesting engineers. That’s why I like what I do. I don’t really get the technology that deeply, but I do very much find the people fascinating. It’s the people who build communities. It’s the people who create history.

Anyway, one character I know here in Tokyo is Hisayoshi Kato (blog, twitter). He’s a core developer in the Japan OpenSolaris community. He’ll be presenting DTrace at the Yokohama Linux User Group (YLUG) Monday night March 29th (and don’t forget DTrace Day on the 27th at the OpenSolaris User Group). If you know Japanese and you want to know DTrace, you should go to these presentations. Everyone is welcome.

Kato-san presented DTrace at the Tokyo Linux User Group a while back, and he’s done technical talks at many FOSS conferences and user groups meetings throughout Japan. He also knows a bunch about ZFS, too. He’s a co-author of this book on ZFS, which is an original work in Japanese. And finally, if you are are going to the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit in San Francisco in April, you may bump into Kato-san there as well. Hopefully, he’ll be able to meet up with some OpenSolaris guys in the Bay Area during the Linux conference.

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

There was an interesting Tokyo Linux User Group Meeting yesterday. We did an Open Space meeting (info here, here, here) to have a free-flowing discussion about the community and what we want to do this year. I took some notes from the conversation and posted them to the list (subscribe here). Basically, we kicked around ideas for technical presentations and how we can structure meetings to enable more types of talks. Also, we want to grow the group, so we’d like to reach out to other communities in Tokyo (and around the world, actually) to see if we can enable some new connections. That’s the part I’m most interested in, and that’ll be my focus as the group’s new vice president (we did a little election today, thanks, guys!). I’m really excited about this. I’ve been participating in TLUG for a few years now, and I want to do a lot more to help the community grow. I missed the nomikai after the meeting because I was up pretty much the entire night before, but I’ll make the next one for sure. Here are some images from the meeting:

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Tokyo Linux User Group 031310

Thursday Feb 25, 2010

4 OpenSolaris Sessions at Tokyo OSC

The OpenSolaris community plans four sessions at the Tokyo Open Source Conference on Friday and Saturday. See announcements from Shoji and Masafumi and Reiko Saito, who also posted her slides. These sessions will involve not only dives into the technology, such as ZFS and new features in the OpenSolaris distribution, but also how to contribute localizations and get involved in the community generally. There will be a booth, so stop by and get some CDs and shirts and other stuff. If you miss the conference, you can catch up with things in March when we'll have more community events at the Sun Yoga office. A Linux technical meeting is planned for the 13th, and then there will be 3 sessions of OpenSolaris later in the month on the 27th.

Friday Feb 05, 2010

Building International Communities in Tokyo

Here are two really nice articles in the Japan Times talking about the international tech community in Tokyo:
The articles describe the meta community here, and that's where we OpenSolaris guys hang out. By contributing to the larger community, we've found that the OpenSolaris community here is growing and earning its way right along side everyone else. There are language and culture barriers to overcome, but we all are making a great deal of progress. It's quite common now to find OpenSolaris developers, administrators, and users participating in multiple international communities, which, of course, helps us to learn in return. And the Web 2.0 community is growing in size and diversity as well. Also, since the tech community locally is well connected globally, we can extend our reach around the world by just interacting right here at home. Here's my photo archive as well (mostly Linux & OpenSolaris).

Monday Dec 14, 2009

OpenSolaris: 3 Community Events This Week

Members of the OpenSolaris Community in Japan will be participating in three community events this week Tokyo's Biggest Tech Party Ever (A Charity Event), OpenSolaris Hot Topics Seminar, and the Tokyo Linux User Group's Technical Meeting & Bonenkai. Should be a pretty busy week to end the year around here. I'll take some images. If you are in the area, stop by. After that I am taking a couple of weeks off -- no email, no cell phone, no Internet, no nothing. Just fresh air.

Saturday Nov 14, 2009

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Some images from the Tokyo Linux User Group technical meeting and nomikai tonight.

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Tokyo Linux User Group 111409 Tokyo Linux User Group 111409

Many more TLUG photos here.

Saturday Oct 31, 2009

OpenSolaris at the Tokyo Open Source Conference

Here are some images from the Fall 2009 Tokyo Open Source Conference. The OpenSolaris community participated with presentations from Reiko Saito and Masafumi Ohta and a booth full of demos for the weekend event. There are some NetBeans and Linux guys mixed in here as well. There were dozens and dozens of communities there.

Friday Oct 23, 2009

Tokyo Linux User Group: 15th Anniversary Event

Some shots from the Tokyo Linux User Group 15th Anniversary Event last night in Akihabara.

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary Tokyo Linux UG 15th Anniversary

My Tokyo Linux User Group archive.

Friday Oct 16, 2009

Looking Back: Spamming the Linux Kernel Mailing List

I subscribed to the Linux kernel mailing list recently. It`s way too technical for me to really follow very closely, but I just wanted to get a feel for the personality of the community. It`s interesting. And things move very rapidly.

But watching all this Linux kernel mail flowing by all day long reminds me that I do actually have some experience posting to the list. Twice, in fact. And it was by far the single most embarrassing moment in my OpenSolaris life, although I must admit it stings much less now all these years later. Here it is. Back before we opened the OS/Net consolidation in June of 2005 (that`s what people consider the main opening of the project), we had been collecting email addresses on our temporary site that hosted the DTrace code, which we had previously opened in January of 2005. People would enter their email addresses into a database on the site so we could then alert them when we opened the main code base. I hated the idea of doing this but obviously lost the argument. Also, I was asked to write the email that we would send to these people announcing the opening of our kernel. The whole thing made me nauseous. But, so be it. On opening day my mail shot out to well over 7 thousand people via our corporate systems. It didn`t come from my mailer, that`s for sure. I just submitted the text to another team and ducked. And did we clean the list beforehand? Of course not. We just let all fly. And it ended up in some rather interesting places -- one of which being the Linux Kernel Mailing List. Here it is. I was mortified. And here is my apology to the entire Linux kernel community shortly thereafter. Like I said, I hated the idea of any mass mailing outside for just this reason. Sure, it was well intentioned, but it was also unnecessary, poorly implemented, and easily gamed. Obviously. Anyway, I did get a few private responses from list members who were very kind and understanding. That made all the difference in the world.

Lessons learned, eh? Hey, you have to go through some pain to learn this community business, right? Fun stuff.

Friday Oct 09, 2009

Tokyo Linux User Group: 15th Anniversary Party

The Tokyo Linux User Group will be celebrating 15 years of Linux in Tokyo in a couple of weeks. I`ll be there. If you want to go, see the info here. I have been participating in TLUG for over two years now, and I have learned a great deal -- not only about Linux but also about the FOSS community in Tokyo. And, actually, the Linux community in Tokyo is international, so you are always meeting people from not only here but from all over the place. In any given meeting, you could easily have conversations with guys from a dozen countries. Really interesting group. Friendly. Open. Technical. Diverse.

Sunday Sep 20, 2009

Building by Contributing

I was meditating earlier and I got a great idea. It`s an obvious idea for me, but for some reason it clicked this time when it bubbled up. Maybe because I have an enormous amount of material now, I don`t know. I have some interesting stories to tell and piles of photographs to play with as source material, and I keep generated new stuff all the time. The more I look the more I find.

Anyway. I am going to put together a new presentation about all the people I look up to as great community builders. Most of them I have met and/or work with every day in the multiple communities in which I participate, but some are just acquaintances who I observe from afar and study in detail. And some I have never met but would love to because they are changing the world in important ways that oftentimes go unrecognized. They teach me. They are international and multi lingual. They are young and old. They cut across many industries and disciplines. Some think big and build globally, but even more think small and organize locally -- and many times that`s even more difficult and more important. Some are famous but most are not. And the common thread tying them together in my mind? They all build communities by contributing to communities. They do. They don`t just talk. That`s the bit they get right, and that`s why they teach so naturally by simply doing what they love. This is personal. That`s why it`s powerful. And that`s why I have to tell these stories. Just looking up to people who build community is not enough. We have to learn from these people and distribute community building opportunities among everyone. That`s the only way a community becomes sustainable.

Saturday Sep 12, 2009

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Some images from the Tokyo Linux User Group (TLUG). Really good technical meeting on Saturday and nomikai later at night. About 50 people came by to hear Zev Blut on using the shell effectively, Alberto Tomita on the upcoming Japan Linux Symposium, and Matthew (Karamoon) on Hackerspaces.

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

Tokyo Linux User Group 091209 Tokyo Linux User Group 091209

All of my TLUG photos here on Flickr
All of my TLUG posts tagged here: http://blogs.sun.com/jimgris/tags/tlug

Saturday Jul 25, 2009

Community Leadership Summit: Photos

Here are some images from the Community Leadership Summit (CLS 2009 Retrospecitve by Jono Bacon) last weekend in San Jose. I'm really glad I had the opportunity to participate in this event. I didn't have a chance to check out OSCON, which followed CLS, but I think this un-conference style of gathering better fits my interests anyway (see this tag here for BarCamp & other community events events in Tokyo). I hope the photos came out ok ...

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Community Leadership Summit Community Leadership Summit

Tuesday Jul 14, 2009

Community Leadership Summit

I'm heading to the Community Leadership Summit this weekend in San Jose, California. Jono Bacon's gig. I'm looking forward to meeting many others who build software communities around the world. I know and respect many of the people planning to attend, so it should be great fun. And it should be a hugely valuable experience, too.



I have an agenda in mind for my time. It's only a weekend, so I need to probe some issues as deeply as I can. I'd especially like to explore how software engineering and user communities are built across language and cultural barriers. That's the biggest deal for me since I live the issue every day and I believe there are big opportunities involved.

Other stuff: How/why do some communities seem to emerge organically (do they really?), while others are built using significant resources and sometimes face big challenges in the process. How do you manage around community dependence issues while investing resources? I know it's not popular to discuss, but I'll be asking people about competitive challenges they face while building communities. Over the years, many have told me that communities shouldn't be competitive (companies compete and communities cooperate, right?), but I've come to question and largely reject that line. I can point to many cases where it's absolutely true, but I also have lots of painful experience demonstrating that it's a lot of BS (I think it depends greatly on geography, culture, placement in the community, and politics).

More: Where is the line distinguishing building from natural evolution? And who defines the difference? On governance issues: Do you start out building with governance in place or let it emerge naturally over time? Do you build a top-down governing system, or let structures bubble up from the bottom when (and if) they are needed? And how do you resolve governance vs development methodologies? How do you measure growth or quality or whatever else you're building? What are the distinctions between building community from the platform of a major corporation vs building community while actually living out in the community itself? How are community development and engineering operations implemented differently around the world? How is community actually defined differently in various regions? Those are some of the issues I'll be poking.

And finally, I'd really love to see how people feel about the issue of "leadership" in communities. That's the name of the conference, after all, and it's an issue we've wrestled with on OpenSolaris forever. My opinion on leadership has evolved greatly over time, but I'm clearly moving in a specific direction lately and feel much more comfortable asserting my view on leadership.

Saturday Jul 11, 2009

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

A bunch of images from the Tokyo Linux User Group Saturday afternoon and evening. Karamoon on Tokyo Hackerspace, Marty Pauley on security, and Michael Sullivan on ZFS.

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109

Tokyo Linux User Group 071109 Tokyo Linux User Group 071109
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