Thursday Oct 18, 2007

OpenSolaris at IEEE at Aizu University

I took a quick day trip to Aizu University yesterday to present OpenSolaris at the IEEE conference there. Aizu is a few hours north Tokyo, and it was great to get out of the city to see trees and mountains as the fall season rolls into Japan. This was my second visit to the Aizu since I was there a few months ago with the team from Sun's Tokyo Software Center.

The presentation yesterday went well. I was talking in a big cafeteria, so it was difficult at times to project my voice over the natural noise in the room, but in our little corner the participants seemed quite interested in OpenSolaris. The audience was a mix of Europeans, Asians, and Americans so English was the common language overall and everyone was very interactive. Also, wireless worked perfectly -- and automatically -- and the projector worked great, too. That's a big deal for me since I always have projector problems with my laptop, but all is well now. The response to OpenSolaris was also really good. I think people are starting to realize that we've done a lot of work in the past few years, and we are getting to a point where a lot of people are noticing and appreciating the effort. I don't see a tipping point yet, but we are getting closer. Perhaps in the spring when Indiana is launched.

I also had my very first experience seeing a bullet train blow through a station at jet speed. Now, riding the bullet is one thing. I've done that many times. It's nice but no big deal. But standing on the platform and watching the thing fly by 20 feet away is another thing altogether. It's extremely impressive. You can't even hear the darn thing coming till it's right under your nose. Then you hear massive sound as it tears through the air and then in a second it's gone. It's that fast. I'm not kidding. It's sort of like watching the Indy cars rip down the backstretch at Indianapolis. Very difficult to get a photo unless you know it's coming. Really wild.

Anyway, here are some pics from the trip. Special thanks to Makoto Uno at Sun for shooting many of the conference photos and to Aizu Professors Toshiaki Miyazaki, Daming Wei, and Incheon Paik for inviting me and making me feel welcome.

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

OpenSolaris at IEEE OpenSolaris at IEEE

Flickr set here. Everything tagged Aizu here.

Tuesday Sep 18, 2007

OpenSolaris at IEEE

IEEE CIT2007: I'll be presenting OpenSolaris at this IEEE Conference at Aizu University in Japan on Oct 17th. Stop by if you are in the area. It's only 4 hours or so north of Tokyo. Really beautiful place.
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