Sunday Jul 01, 2007

Japan: Aizu University Photos

I went with the Sun Japan team to the University of Aizu this weekend for a series of hands-on workshops and presentations on Java and OpenSolaris and an OpenSolaris install-fest with the latest Solaris Express Developer Edition. Schedule in Japanese and English. I also had a chance to play around with the very cool new Sun Ray Notebook (article in Japanese), which I think would work quite well right here in my apartment (hint, hint). 135 photos on flickr and below ...

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

TOP: LEFT TO RIGHT: Miki Matsui, Masaki Katakai, Takayuki Okazaki, Akira Ohsone, Takanobu Masuzuki, Nobuchika Kobayashi, Satoshi Kawai, Shingo Takamatsu. BOTTOM: LEFT TO RIGHT: Hiroaki Nozaki, Kazuya Kawahara, Fumihiko Iwabuchi, Kenji Funasaki, Mitsuru Sasanuma.

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

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OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu

OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu OpenSolaris & Java at Aizu


Sun Japan article on the trip here.

Friday Jun 22, 2007

60,000

We just crossed over the 60,000 mark for people registered on opensolaris.org. Cool. Register here.

Thursday Jun 14, 2007

OpenSolaris at Two

Congratulations to the OpenSolaris Community! We're two!

We've had an amazing year, haven't we? I thought I'd do a little roll up of some stuff that interests me and that I generally track. It's not really intended to capture 100% of what's going on, of course, so leave a comment if I've missed something big or if I have something wrong.

Measuring and tracking an engineering project the size of OpenSolaris is difficult. But as a project manager, I'm trying to look at OpenSolaris from a different perspective and from a much more comprehensive perspective. There are a lot of things going on here both inside and outside the company. The code base is massive (10+ million lines, 35,000+ files), and there are about 1,000 engineers in the Solaris organization working on that code and the products made from the code. Now add in almost 60,000 new people since we opened two years ago. Then there are the ongoing engineering operations inside the company to finish opening the source, building the infrastructure, and migrating the internal development systems across the firewall for open development. There are also critical process changes being planned and implemented to separate development from productization while the company simultaneously builds, ships, and supports products for customers. Then there are community and company marketing programs wrapped around the entire project. Customer and partner interactions ranging from engineering, marketing, sales, and services right on up through the executive levels. Governance operations and open elections add yet another component. Press and analyst meetings. Website hosting. Conferences. Multi language user groups and country portals and university programs around the world. Ports to other hardware platforms and operating systems. Distributions. Mail lists. IRC channels. Blogs. New development projects and the opening of existing projects. Community Group formation. Legal issues. Business issues. Competitive issues. Leadership issues. It's a lot. OpenSolaris cuts across many things at Sun as we open up to build and connect new communities around the world.

I'm not sure how you quantify all of it, but after only two years, I'd say we've come a long way ... 

CODE RELEASES

Context: OpenSolaris source is being released in stages. DTrace was released on 1/25/05, OS/Net on 6/14/05, and we've been opening code ever since. There have been even more code releases within the projects not listed here, but these are the major releases:
  1. 01/25/05: DTrace Source Code
  2. 06/14/05: OS/Networking Consolidation Source Code (the main OpenSolaris launch)
  3. 10/28/05: JDS Consolidation Source Code
  4. 11/10/05: DevPro Consolidation: SCCS/make Binaries
  5. 11/15/05: OpenGrok Source Browser Source Code
  6. 11/16/05: ZFS Project integrated into ON build 27
  7. 01/27/06: Network Storage Consolidation Source Code
  8. 02/22/06: DevPro Consolidation: libm/libmvec Source Code
  9. 02/28/06: DevPro Consolidation: libmtsk Binaries
  10. 03/06/06: Install Consolidation: Packaging Tools Source Code
  11. 03/29/06: SFW Consolidation Source Code
  12. 03/31/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • ZFS Administration Guide
    • Device Driver Tutorial
  13. 03/31/06: X Window System Consolidation Source Code
  14. 05/10/06: Globalization Consolidation: Source for OS/Net Consolidation Message Files
  15. 05/31/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • Solaris Dynamic Tracing Guide
    • System Administration Guide: Solaris Containers -- Resource Management and Solaris Zones
  16. 06/12/06: DevPro Consolidation: medalib Source Code
  17. 06/26/06: Companion CD Source Code
  18. 06/30/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • OpenSolaris Developer's Reference
    • Solaris Containers: Resource Management and Solaris Zones Developer's Guide
  19. 07/28/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • Solaris Volume Manager System Administration Guide
    • Solaris Express Installation Guide: Basic Installations
  20. 08/31/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions Installation and Configuration Guide
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions Label Administration
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions User's Guide
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions Transition Guide
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions Developer's Guide
    • Solaris Express Installation Guide: Solaris Flash Archives (Creation and Installation)
    • System Administration Guide: Basic Administration
    • System Administration Guide: Advanced Administration
  21. 09/11/06: BrandZ Project integrated into ON build 49
  22. 09/26/06: DevPro Consolidation: SUNWlibC (C++ runtime libraries) Binaries
  23. 09/29/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • Application Packaging Developer's Guide
    • DTrace User Guide
    • Solaris Trusted Extensions Administrator's Procedures
  24. 10/06/06: Solaris PowerPC source release
  25. 10/20/06: SPARC Graphics Consolidation: Device Driver Binaries
  26. 11/30/06: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • Solaris Express Installation Guide: Custom JumpStart and Advanced Installations
    • Solaris Express Installation Guide: Planning for Installation and Upgrade
    • Solaris Tunable Parameters Reference Manual
    • System Administration Guide: Security Services
  27. 12/08/06: Man Page Consolidation: Source for an initial set of 356 man pages.
  28. 12/18/06: ON Test: Source for the NFSv4 Test Suite
  29. 12/19/06: DevPro Consolidation: Source for SCCS and make
  30. 12/22/06: Globalization Consolidation Source Code
  31. 01/18/07: Globalization Consolidation: Source for multiple translations
  32. 01/26/07: Man Page Consolidation: Source for a second set of 2790 man pages
  33. 02/20/07: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • System Administration Guide: IP Services
  34. 04/12/07: Documentation Consolidation: Source for
    • System Administration Guide: Naming and Directory Services (DNS, NIS, and LDAP)
    • System Administration Guide: Network Services
  35. 05/24/07: Man Page Consolidation: Source for third set of 622 man pages

LIST CONVERSATIONS

Context: The level of list conversation on the OpenSolaris project has grown steadily in the first two years and shows no sign of slowing. In fact, the rate of growth is increasing in all directions and it will continue to increase we we continue opening code and building infrastructure.

MEMBERSHIP

Context: The number of people singed up to opensolaris.org grew significantly in year two due primarily to three factors: the OpenSolaris Starter Kit, a significant amount of direct community building via conferences and user groups around the world, and the releasing of more code and infrastructure for the community to use.

USER GROUPS | COMMUNITIES | PROJECTS

Context: During the first year, the number of communities grew and plateaued at 40, while the number of projects grew substantially in the second year with project and SCM support on the site. There was also significant growth in the user groups and most recently in campus user groups. The OpenSolaris Governing Board is currently addressing a community-wide reorganization, so the number of Community Groups will be consolidated somewhat in the coming months, but we expect continued growth in the number of projects and user groups well into the future.

ADVOCACY

Context: OpenSolaris is now regularly represented at developer conferences around the world in technical sessions, keynotes, BOFs, and other activities. Sun has donated resources in the form of OpenSolaris Starter Kits, computer system give-a-ways, and people to help build community, and non-Sun community members are doing their part as well by starting groups, building distros, contributing code, and presenting their work at events all around the world.
  • 45+ Conferences: JavaOne, CommunityOne, OpenSolaris Days at Sun Tech Days (15 cities in 12 countries), PostgreSQL, Sun Japan Business.Next, Viennese Linux Weeks, LinuxTag, OpenSolaris Developer Conference in Berlin, OSCON, EuroOSCON, Japan Open Source Conference, LinuxWorld (multiple cities), Beijing Open Source Conference, FOSS.IN, Lisa/Usenix (multiple cities), ApacheCon, ApacheCon Europe, MySQL, OSBC, GUADEC, FISL, Colorado Technology in Education Conference, DebConf, FOSDEM, SANE, SIGCSE, JavaUK, Nihon Sun Symposium ... and probably a few more but that's all I can remember at the moment.
  • Hundreds of user group meetings in dozens of cities around the world.

INFRASTRUCTURE

Context: Support for the Subversion and Mercurial source code management systems (SCM) were specified and tested in the open and implemented on opensolaris.org this year. Many projects use Mercurial now, one consolidation -- Java Desktop System -- uses Subversion as its source repository, and the Companion Project uses Subversion as well. The main ON Consolidation will migrate to Mercurial and be opened this year.

GOVERNANCE

Context: The first full OpenSolaris Governing Board (OGB) was elected in March of 2007 at the same time the OpenSolaris Constitution was ratified. The OpenSolaris Constitution outlines how the community is organized and governed and how power and decision making is distributed widely.

CONTRIBUTIONS

Context: People are contributing to the OpenSolaris community in a variety of ways: answering questions on list, blogging, doing press/analyst interviews, creating artwork, doing podcasts and screencasts, setting up and leading communities/projects, reporting bugs, writing Docs and articles and books, aggregating community news, quantifying mail list activity, offering code and scripts. Many contributions are being tracked monthly in the OpenSolaris Newsletter.

Regarding code contributions, though, here's a summary of the request-sponsor program:

PORTS AND DISTRIBUTIONS

Context: Current OpenSolaris ports and distros that I can find.

EDUCATION

Context: You can find OpenSolaris being used in computer science and other technical courses and seminars at universities around the world.

GOVERNMENT

Context: In July of 2006, Japan's Information-Technology Promotion Agency (IPA) recognized OpenSolaris for a project in Okinawa. As far as we know, Japan is the first government to issue a press release placing OpenSolaris along side other open source projects for recommendation by the government. Further OpenSolaris-based test implementations are taking place around the country in this government-sponsored program.
WEBSITE

Context: The OpenSolaris website continues to evolve and support more OpenSolaris community-building activities.

GOOGLE SUMMER OF CODE

Context: The OpenSolaris community participated in the Google Summer of Code in 2006 and 2007 along with dozens of other open source projects:

COMMUNITY LINKS

Context: The number of reference links for OpenSolaris is far too long now, but here are more than a few:

General: opensolaris.org | Principles | User Groups | Communities | Projects | Distributions | Presentations | Metrics | BooksSolaris Internals, OpenSolaris, Solaris Systems Programming, Solaris books in China | Photos | News: Announcements, News, Newsletter, Delicious | Portals: Japan, Poland, China, France | Lists: Subscribe via Forums, Subscribe via Mailman, Search/Post via Jive | IRC: RC Channels, #opensolaris, #opensolaris-es, #solaris-fr, #opensolaris-de, #opensolaris-pl, #bosug, #opensolaris-i18n, #opensolaris-mx | Blogs: OpenSolaris Blogs, Planet Sun: Solaris, Planet Sun, Planet Solaris, Planet OpenSolaris | Governance & Development Process: OGB, Charter, Governance, Development Process, CDDL: License FAQ, CDDL: MPL diffs | Contributing: Contributing, Request Sponsor, Putbacks, Bug Activity, ARC Cases, Contributor Agreement, Contributor Agreement FAQ | Newsgroups: alt.solaris.x86, comp.unix.solaris, solarisx86 | User Groups: Groups, Leaders, Lists, Argentina, Atlanta, Austin, Bangalore, Beijing, Capital Region, Chennai, Columbus, Czech, Coimbatore, Dallas/Ft. Worth, Ft. Lauderdale, Finland, French, Front Range, Germany, Great Lakes, Hyderabad, Irish, Indonesia, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kansas City, Korea, London, Madurai, Moscow, Mumbai, Netherlands, New England, New York City, Poland, Pune, Romania, Russia, San Antonio, San Diego, Seattle, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Silicon Valley, Singapore, South Africa, Spain, St. Louis, Sweden, Switzerland, Sydney, Tampa, Turkey, Venezuela, Warangal | Solaris Sites: Solaris | Blastwave | BigAdmin | SunFreeware |


Not a bad 24 months of life, I'd say. There is still more to do, though, so don't be shy. Get involved.

Again, congratulations to the OpenSolaris Community -- a group of people who two years ago were told rather directly that we simply didn't exist, and that if we did exist at all our community would be small and would ultimately fail. Well, look at where we are now ...

Tuesday Jun 12, 2007

Developers' Lounge

Some images from the Developers' Lounge last nite in Tokyo ...

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Set at flickr ...

Sunday Jun 10, 2007

RubyKaigi2007

I spent the weekend at RubyKaigi2007 in Tokyo. It was great to see Tim Bray again and also to meet Dave Thomas for the first time. Both Tim and Dave gave excellent presentations, along with Sun JRuby developers Charles Nutter and Thomas Enebo. In fact, Dave got a standing ovation for his conference-closing keynote, which was a beautiful tribute to the Ruby community. He basically thanked the community and talked at length about the community's values and how to protect those values as the community enters into a rapid growth phase. Some nice lessons for us in the OpenSolaris community as we grow as well.

I met dozens of other people from Japan (obviously) and from Europe and the U.S., and I spent a lot of time talking with some great TLUG guys (Zev Blut, Edward Middleton, Alain Hoang) as well. I even met Yukihiro Matsumoto after his opening keynote. Very cool. Overall, I was very impressed with the Ruby community. There is huge diversity there, and the community feels totally authentic. The Japanese presentations seemed creative, and the audience responded enthusiastically to the speakers. And there were a lot of speakers, too! Dozens. How they pulled off so many speakers without a hitch I'll never know. But it just worked. I also loved the IRC screen for live audience conversation during the presentations, and the live IRC translations of the English speakers, too. Very creative.

I took a lot of pictures, and I think they represent the passion I so clearly felt at the conference. This community is young. It's alive. It's dynamic. I had a blast. And thanks, guys. I learned a great deal about the most important thing you are teaching.


Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007 Ruby Kaigi 2007

See Takayuki Okazaki (here, here, here, here) and Masaki Katakai (here, here) for more on Ruby Kaigi 2007. More photos on flicker here. Presentations here.

Tuesday Jun 05, 2007

Some Josh Shots

I stopped by the PostgreSQL Conference in Tokyo today to see Josh Berkus give an update on where the community is and where it's going. Really interesting and impressive presentation. These guys have been at it for 11 years now. Josh talked about how the community is growing globally, and also some of the technical advancements developers can expect in upcoming releases. Josh said he's focusing on PostgreSQL on Solaris most recently, and he showed off some of the benefits of DTrace in a demo. He also touched on the desire for Japanese and English speaking developers to work more closely together. It seems that as open source grows in the East, language and culture issues will become even more important.


Josh Berkus, PostgreSQL, Tokyo

Update: Here are some more images from the conference along with a video of Josh's keynote. From Hiroshi Saito.

Wednesday May 23, 2007

OpenSolaris in Tokyo

OpenSolaris participated in Sun Japan's Business.Next Conference in Tokyo today. There were a couple of thousand people there attending various events. OpenSolaris (presented by Akira Ohsone) was part of an all day community track, which included sessions on Java, Open Source, Ruby, JRuby, NetBeans, Web 2.0, PostgreSQL, and probably some other stuff I missed (everything was in Japanese and I couldn't stay for the entire event). But it was cool to see that the community track had the biggest room, and we filled it consistently. In fact, I understand that the community sessions were the most popular of the entire conference. That's great news for the business of community development in Japan. And it's good news for Sun Japan as well. Here are some shots from a couple of sessions in the community track ...

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source Sun Japan Open Source

Sun Japan Business.Next

Wednesday May 09, 2007

CommunityOne Photos: San Francisco 2007

Some photos from CommunityOne yesterday ...

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JavaOne set on flickr.

Thursday Apr 26, 2007

Solaris Night Seminar: Tokyo

I went to the Solaris Night Seminar tonight after work to see Sun engineers Kenji Funasaki, Takanobu Masuzuki, Akira Ohsone, and Hiroaki Nozaki talk about Solaris and OpenSolaris. There were about 50 people there, and I believe the guys have scheduled another seminar already. Demand is growing ...

Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar

Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar

Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar

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Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar Solaris Night Seminar

Saturday Apr 21, 2007

Mozilla Japan

I stopped by to see the Mozilla guys in Tokyo today. It was great to meet Seth Bindernagel and Seth Spitzer from Mozilla in the U.S. and Gen Kanai from Mozilla here in Japan. I couldn't stay for long, but I can see the Japanese Mozilla community is thriving, which is really cool.

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Mozilla set on flickr

Thursday Mar 29, 2007

2007 China Software Innovation Summit

I just got back from a few days in Beijing at the 2007 China Software Innovation Summit & Open Source Forum.

Open Source and Open Standards expert Stephen Walli invited me to present OpenSolaris and talk about our community building efforts. I'm always happy to talk about the OpenSolaris community, so I was honored to participate. It was great meeting some of the other speakers -- Mike Olson, former CEO of SleepyCat Software; Nat Torkington of O'Reilly Radar and Program Chair of OSCON; Christophe Bisciglia, senior engineer at Google, Taiwen Jiang, lead developer on the XOOPS project, Mikko Puhakka, founder of Open Tuesday in Finland; and Calvin Sun, software development manager at MySQL.

In fact, one of the best things about this conference is that I met a great deal of new people from a variety of countries, and I have a stack of business cards 3/4 of an inch thick. There were many students and professors there as well as government officials and developers from around China. The energy level was very high, and it by far the most interesting trip to China and certainly the most valuable from an Open Source learning perspective. Many exciting things are taking place in China, and it will be fascinating to participate in the growth of so many new Open Source communities. I hope to go back soon and keep going back.

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference Beijing Open Source Conference

My flicker set here. And Stephen's flickr set here. He even has some shots of me all dressed up on stage. Jing Jing, thank you for translating my slides. Amy, thanks for the advice, and I promise to install the Ubuntu DVD. :) And thank you, Stephen, for having me along. You ran a flawless forum.

The OpenSolaris Election

Congratulations to the new OpenSolaris Governing Board: James Carlson, Alan Coopersmith, Casper Dik, Glynn Foster, Stephen Lau, Rich Teer, and Keith Wesolowski. And also congratulations to the OpenSolaris Community for approving the first OpenSolaris Constitution. Our first election is now in the history books, and that's an accomplishment we should all be proud of.

Also, a word of thanks needs to go out to the CAB/OGB that created the OpenSolaris Charter and Constitution in the first place -- Casper Dik, Roy Fielding, Al Hopper, Simon Phipps, and Rich Teer, and also to the governance working group members, Stephen Hahn, Keith Wesolowski, and Ben Rockwood. The process was long and the bar kept changing on those guys, so we are all thankful for their patience and effort. Creating something from nothing is always challenging, but the community now has a foundation on which to build.

For those who voted for me in this election, I deeply appreciate your confidence. Perhaps we'll be back at it again next year. :)

Saturday Mar 24, 2007

OpenSolaris Installfest Pics

Some shots from the OpenSolaris Installfest in Tokyo today ...

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo OpenSolaris Installfest Tokyo

Saturday Mar 17, 2007

Tokyo Open Source Conference: OpenSolaris

I went to the Tokyo Open Source Conference again today. Nozaki-san presented a session on OpenSolaris technologies, and Ohsone-san led a session on the new Japan OpenSolaris User Group. We gave out about 200 OpenSolaris Starter Kits throughout the day, too. Excellent day ...

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Full photo set on Flickr.

See http://jp.opensolaris.org/ to get involved in the Japan OpenSolaris Community.

Friday Mar 16, 2007

Tokyo Open Source Conference: Java

I went to the Tokyo Open Source Conference today with Shinya Ogino, Takanobu Masuzuki, and Takayuki Okazaki to hear Okazaki-san's presentation on open source Java. There are two OpenSolaris sessions tomorrow, so that's where I'll be. Full set on Flickr.

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference Tokyo Open Source Conference

Tuesday Mar 13, 2007

About Me and the OGB

Why Run?

I'm running for a position on the OpenSolaris Governing Board (OGB). The OpenSolaris Community is completing its second very successful year, and as we approach that anniversary we are actually addressing some of the most important issues to date -- development infrastructure, website functionality, global community growth, governance, the role of Sun, the role of the OGB, the migration of large numbers of Solaris engineers to open development, relationships with other communities, and many other issues. No individual board member can be expert in all areas, or even have interest in all areas, and I'm surely no exception. But I'd like to be involved in some key functions that I feel passionate about. I also have the least amount of technical experience of all the candidates in the field, so I'm bound to offer a somewhat different perspective on some of these things. That's why I'm running.

Background

I've been at Sun for almost seven years in a variety of project management positions. I've worked on several Corporate Communications teams for the Java organization, and I've also worked with the tools and standards groups and many of Sun's open source development projects. I also did a year as an executive speech writer for a couple of Sun's executive vice presidents. Overall, I've logged nine years in communications at five companies (Sun, 3Com, Network World, Tufts University, Animals Magazine) in three industries (high tech, publishing, medical sciences). More than three years ago, I moved from Sun's Corporate Communications group to the OpenSolaris project in engineering. I'm the Community Manager on the team, and I've been involved since the beginning.

In general, I'm fascinated with how things are designed and built and with the people doing the building and managing. I used to run my own construction business in New York, so I see software engineering and open source development as a similar experience to construction in many ways. I have also written and edited and published a lot of articles and dealt with a lot of technical people, so I see communications and logistics as a critical part of software development as well. All my life all I've done is project management, and I'm still doing it now.

My Position for OpenSolaris

The OpenSolaris Community faces many issues, but we also have some amazing opportunities we can embrace as well. I'm  not going to address the more technical subjects because they are simply not where I spend my time and I have no real technical expertise to offer. Instead, I'm more concerned with how the community grows, how it functions, how it communicates with itself and with others, and how it maintains its values. That's my focus.

Growth: It's clear the OpenSolaris community is growing. What does it mean to have tends of thousands of people get involved in rapidly emerging markets like China and India? How will the culture of the OpenSolaris community change because of this trend? It's also clear that Sun wants the OpenSolaris community to grow since the company is not only funding the project itself, but it's also investing in new programs such as the global distribution of OpenSolaris Starter Kits that require registration to be fulfilled. That's a good thing, obviously, but global programs can have a significant impact on the community, and the OGB needs to be aware of such moves. We all want to grow, but how we grow and how we invest our resources to grow is just as important as the growth itself.

Participation: The OGB ought to encourage community participation and help facilitate that participation -- both within Sun and outside of Sun and in both technical and non-technical areas. Sounds simple? It's actually a pretty dynamic and challenging job that requires a complex mixing of cultures and the implementation of new technology. It takes time and tools and ultimately requires a lot of face-to-face contact to support the ongoing online operations. Also, the OGB needs to address the challenge of increasing participation across the natural barriers of language and culture around the world.

Values: The OpenSolaris Community has a fine set of documented values. The OGB should actively lead the promotion of those values so we remain an open, honest, honorable, respectful community. Recently, our values have been tested, and in some areas trust has broken down. The new OGB will have to emphasize values as a core competency for community participation. Community members need to feel that OpenSolaris is a welcoming community and one that values diverse opinions and new ideas.

Communication: The OGB needs to establish ongoing communication channels with the community and with Sun's executives. The OGB will probably have to build new lines of communication to other open source communities and perhaps other companies in the future, as well. There are clear communication challenges that can be addressed, especially between Sun's executive management and the OpenSolaris Community. So we may as well start talking. The OGB will only be successful in this area if it leads through an ethic of understated, consensus-building conversations. That's the only way the board will earn the respect of Sun, the community, and other organizations.

The current CAB/OGB did an excellent job of creating the OpenSolaris Charter and the OpenSolaris Constitution. The next OGB will have to bring those documents to life, so they are expressed in the community in ways in which we can all be proud. I'd very much like to be a part of that process.

Saturday Mar 10, 2007

More Pics from Germany

More photos from the OpenSolaris Conference in Germany here, here, here, here.

Thursday Mar 08, 2007

Developer's Lounge

Last night I went to a very nice little gathering of developers in Tokyo -- The Developer's Lounge. I met people from various communities around here, including Linux, Postgres, KDE, NetBeans, Curl, Ruby, OpenSolaris, Java, and a few companies as well. This was my first time, but I hope to go regularly. The really cool thing about it was that many people presented about their projects, those presos were all short with just a few slides or no slides at all, and it was all done in an understated social setting. Lack of formality is oftentimes a nice delivery mechanism for the transmission of information. Good food, good wine, and a little conversation. Works for me. I took some pics, too ...

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo

Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo Developers Lounge: Tokyo


Friday Mar 02, 2007

OpenSolaris in Germany

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OpenSolaris in Germany

Sunday Feb 11, 2007

The OGB's Decree

Last week, four out of the five OpenSolaris Governing Board members issued the CAB/OGB Position Paper # 20070207 in an attempt to outline their position on the issue of potentially dual licensing OpenSolaris with GPLv3 and CDDL. I responded to the OGB's position paper because I have concerns about the language they used to articulate their position and their attempt to thwart an open conversation on OpenSolaris by issuing a "decree" saying that "[f]urther discussion on GPL\* is merely a diversion and distraction that should be discouraged." That's a remarkable statement and needs to be challenged.

For the purposes of this discussion, I don't particularly care about the distinctions between GPLv2, GPLv3, and CDDL. All I ask is that the elected representatives of the OpenSolaris community not use inflammatory terms like "fostering FUD towards OpenSolaris" to describe a fellow open source community and also not try to stop an open debate on our forums. There are perfectly valid differences of opinion between the proponents of all licenses, and there's no reason we can't explore all of the issues whenever we want.

To me, the most important words written about Opensolaris are contained in the OpenSolaris Community Principles:
  • The project will evolve in full view of the world. By opening our code, processes, documentation, and historical information to everyone, we offer a real opportunity for others to join our community and contribute from an equal footing. Technical information will be withheld if there are legal restrictions, never because it is incomplete or of poor quality.
  • We will be inclusive. Proposals will be evaluated based on technical merit and consistency with overarching design goals, constraints, and requirements.
  • We will be respectful and honest. Developers and users have the right to be treated with respect. We do not make ad hominem attacks, and we encourage constructive criticism. Our commitment to civil discourse allows new users and contributors with contrarian ideas an opportunity to be heard without intimidation.
  • Quality is always a top priority. The OpenSolaris project will continue the long tradition of quality engineering established by the Solaris Operating System.
  • We are independent. Decisions within the project are made independently from those concerning Sun's business. Sun's management controls the business aspects of the Solaris product, but will not exert undue influence within the OpenSolaris community.
The third bullet is most important in this context: "We will be respectful and honest. Developers and users have the right to be treated with respect. We do not make ad hominem attacks, and we encourage constructive criticism. Our commitment to civil discourse allows new users and contributors with contrarian ideas an opportunity to be heard without intimidation."

I think I'll continue following the OpenSolaris Community Principles. I can not accept the OGB's decree.

Friday Nov 10, 2006

OpenSolaris in Korea 142 Photos

I just got back from OpenSolaris Day at Sun's Tech Days Conference in Korea. I took a few pics, as you can see. I'm lucky I got these. I think my little G2 is on it's last legs.

Anyway, it was great to see the Tech Days team again (thanks for the book, Frank!) and to meet the Sun Korean team as well as the many developers who attended the conference. It was a successful day of events for sure. There's certainly a lot of interest in Solaris and OpenSolaris in Korea. There were more than 210 developers and administrators who attended OpenSolaris Day. The OpenSolaris Day World Tour is a day of OpenSolaris tagged on to the main Sun Tech Days conference tour. The conference itself is much bigger, of course, and includes lots of technical sessions on Solaris and Java.

At the end of OpenSolaris Day, we held a drawing for a free Ultra 20, which was great fun. The winner was Park Jeong Hwan, an engineer from ZUVIX Technology. Congratulations!



Tuesday Oct 24, 2006

Photos: OpenSolaris in Buenos Aires

Teresa Giacomini posted some photos from OpenSolaris Day in Buenos Aires.

Saturday Sep 30, 2006

OpenSolaris at Tech Days Beijing: 150 Photos

I spent a few days in China with the OpenSolaris community at Sun's Tech Days Beijing Conference. This conference tour is really growing in diversity these days. NetBeans participation is huge, and OpenSolaris is all over the place as well. I think we are all helping to build on an already successful conference series with the inclusion of these open source projects. NetBeans got involved in last year's tour, and OpenSolaris is getting involved this year.

OpenSolaris at Tech Days Beijing In Beijing this week, about a dozen Solaris executives, engineers, and managers from the U.S. and China participated in multiple events at the conference -- the Solaris track on day two, the OpenSolaris Day on day three, the Beijing OpenSolaris User Group meeting at Tsinghua University, the new Beijing Solaris Product User Group, and the University World Tour at the China Academy of Science (CAS) Graduate School of Engineering. That's a lot. But the demand is clearly there. Very impressive.

Interest in Solaris and OpenSolaris is running very high in China. The sessions were well attended, and they all offered solid technical content. Even I participated, though I don't talk about technology. I presented my OpenSolaris community story twice -- once to the students at CAS and once at the OpenSolaris Day at Tech Days. The CAS event went on for hours and hours on Thursday. It was a very hot day, and the room had no air conditioning. Yet a total of 650 students attended, and many were standing and sitting on the floor all over the place. Amazing. The OpenSolaris Day ran all of Friday, and there were about 165 developers or so. At the conference generally, well over a thousand people were exposed to various Solaris and OpenSolaris conversations during three days of events.

I took some shots from as many sessions as I could, but I clearly missed a lot of stuff. There was a professional photographer floating around with a real cannon for a camera, so I hope the Tech Days team posts his pictures someplace. He was shooting some nice stuff. I see Joey has some images, and so does John. There will probably be more in the coming weeks.

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Thanks to the Tech Days team for having me around. And thanks to the Sun China guys for taking care of me, so I didn't get cluelessly lost all week with everything going on. It's so impressive the scale that these guys are dealing with. I'm looking forward to investing a great deal of time in China with you guys. :)

A call for open community participation. If you are doing interesting things with OpenSolaris and want to get involved with the Tech Days conference tour, let us know. Let me a comment or email me (jim dot grisanzio at sun dot com). We are looking for non-Sun speakers. Check the schedule for a venue near you. OpenSolaris Day is free, so please feel free to stop by.

Saturday Sep 23, 2006

NSUG: 107 Photos

I attended the 18th Nihon Sun User Group Symposium in Tokyo yesterday. It was very nice meeting everyone from the community and hearing about their experiences in this market. I have so much to learn, my goodness. It's very exciting, though. I was also honored to present my OpenSolaris Story to everyone, and I appreciate the live translation, too. I took about 100 images from the all day event.

jimgris

Wednesday Sep 06, 2006

ZFS in Japan: Photos

Here are some shots from the Nihon Sun User Group meeting last night at Sun's office in Yoga ...
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Thursday Aug 17, 2006

More IBM on OpenSolaris

So, today was IBM on OpenSolaris day. Well, last nite and today. I commented yesterday on this as well. Here are some links to stuff I found resulting from IBM's comments:


By the way, the conclusion expressed in the "Open Battle Royal" link up there is wrong. I never hit back at IBM on AIX. The press has been asking IBM about that, not Sun. I'm sure Sun has poked IBM about AIX being closed in the past, but it doesn't seem to be part of this round of press articles. Personally, I'm on record saying that it's just fine that AIX is closed and that's IBM's business, not mine. I also applaud IBM's contributions to various open source communities, most notably Linux, Apache, and Eclipse. It's fine for vendors to compete, but that doesn't take away IBM's contributions to the broader open source effort.

I'm quoted in the Cnet article, which seemed to contain the most hostile comments of the bunch. Which is unfortunate in general since we are working hard on this project to open up all this stuff and build a community, and we are trying to take advice from all who participate. And IBM is certainly welcome to participate in our community. I'm not sure they are offering advice here, though:

According to Dan Frye:
  • "Sun holds it all behind the firewall. The community sees nothing."
  • "It's a facade. There's lots of marketing, but no community to speak of."
  • "They would push their design discussions out into the forums, so people can see what's going on."
  • "They have done nothing to build a community," with only 16 non-Sun people contributing code to the project in its first 11 months ... Linux, in comparison, had 10 times that number in the same period after it was launched by Linus Torvalds in 1991-- and that was with no Internet and no advertisements.
Charming.

All I can say that the opening of Solaris is still taking place. Don't you think it's unfair to judge it so harshly when we're only a year into it? I think we've been pretty open about telling people that this would take time. The opening of Solaris is itself a multi-step engineering and community development process, and the OpenSolaris community is very much part of that process. Anyway, I read through all of the articles and I came up with a few links that may help offer some information around IBM's assertions. I think I have them all covered to one extent or another, but people can argue with anything, I suppose. Here they are:


Now, do we have more to do? Yep. But are we well on our way? Absolutely. Does all that equal "a facade" as suggested? Absolutely not.

And finally, when Frye mischaracterizes our progress and then compares that to the Linux community you should know that we are not comparing ourselves to the Linux community. Heck, it's hard enough just keeping up with OpenSolaris let alone bringing in another system and community into the mix. I've said many times that the Linux community impresses me massively, and the OpenSolaris community can learn a great deal from them. Both technologies and both communities stand on their own.

Wednesday Aug 16, 2006

IBM Attacks OpenSolaris -- Again

Well, there they go again. IBM kicked OpenSolaris again -- IBM says Sun's open source strategy lacks support. This latest effort comes to us from LinuxWorld in San Francisco courtesy of Scott Handy, who also attacked OpenSolaris last year, and Dan Frye. Their statements about our community only represent their own ignorance because their rhetoric is so easily undermined. It's a shame, though, don't you think? IBM should be applauded for their efforts in the Apache, Linux, and Eclipse communities (and others, I'm sure), but I'm having a difficult time praising them since they seem so mean spirited toward OpenSolaris. We're not going away, guys. In fact, we're only getting bigger and stronger every day. But actually, from a community point of view, I think we've been somewhat humble this first year. We are trying to build a community that leads with technology, not spin. Maybe that's just my hope, but I think we've largely done a pretty good job of respecting others.

I don't know very many people at IBM, but I did have the opportunity to interact with some IBM engineers one time, and they were absolute professionals. Oh, well. What can I say. I commented on a previous attack from IBM's Ross Mauri last week. Most of that applies here as well. Just to keep the continuity going here ...

Thursday Aug 03, 2006

Nihon Sun User Group Meeting

Thanks to Takaaki Higuchi for introducing me and giving me a few minutes to address the Nihon Sun User Group (NSUG) at the Sun office in Yoga last night. Everyone was very open and kind. I attended the meeting with Akira Ohsone who made sure I didn't get lost on the trains, and I made it home all by myself and didn't get lost this time. I'm doing pretty well on the trains, actually. Only got really lost one time. Well, twice. Anyway, Michitoshi Sato from Sony presented on Solaris Volume Manager, which for me represented an all new level of complexity hearing about a technical subject in Japanese. And it was very nice meeting Sato-san afterwards. There were about 40 people there.

I'll be presenting OpenSolaris in detail to the NSUG Symposium in late September, so that should be quite an opportunity. There are several venues where Solaris users and developers meet here, so I'm looking forward to attending as many of these meetings as possible to see how we can collaborate on OpenSolaris development issues.

Thursday Jun 15, 2006

State of California

I occasionally talk to Solaris customers and OpenSolaris developers at Sun's Executive Briefing Center here in Menlo Park. I've been doing it for about six months or so, but I've been wanting to do it for years. I start slow, I guess. Anyway, I have my very own little preso that I carry around. It's great fun. Yesterday I took a road trip to Sacramento to visit a customer to talk about OpenSolaris. They were very interested in what's going on with the OpenSolaris community, so I hope to go back again. There's nothing like a direct, one-to-one interaction with a customer. It beats working through filters.  I really enjoy these exchanges because you never know who you'll be talking to, but the group is generally small enough -- between 5 and 20 people -- that you can really make progress individually.
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